01c-INTERVIEWS & FORUM (blog)

It is best to just scroll down and you will see the interviews and forums in order-newest at top.
OR 
If you are looking for a specific interview use 
Ctrl-F and enter full or partial author name.


Robert McKee explains Why Your Ending Comes First

posted by David Alan Binder

I know that I quote Robert quite a bit.  His wisdom can't be beat and when he talks, I listen.

 

Robert McKee emailed me the following explanation of why your ending comes first.

 

He always makes such good sense:

 

“Why Your Ending Comes First

The climax of the last act is your great imaginative leap. Without it, you have no story. Until you have it, your characters wait like suffering patients praying for a cure.

Your ending is just the beginning.

Once a story climax is created, stories are in a significant way rewritten backwards, not forward. The flow of life moves from cause to effect, but the flow of creativity often pushes from effect to cause. Once you have your ending, it's your job to supply the hows and whys. All scenes must be thematically or structurally justified in light of creating your climax.

If a scene can be cut

without disturbing the impact of the ending,

it must be cut.

 

From the way you tell your story, you whisper to the audience: "expect an up ending", "expect a down ending" or "expect irony". Having pledged a certain emotion, it'd be ruinous not to deliver. Anyone can deliver a happy ending, or a downer. An artist gives us the emotion they've promised, but with a rush of unexpected insight they've withheld.

In other words, give the audience what they want,

but not in the way it expects.”

 

 

Robert McKee continues with Part 5

posted Apr 14, 2019, 10:31 AM by David Alan Binder

Robert McKee continues with Part 5

 

This was emailed to me by Robert McKee.  He teaches story, I listen.

 

 

“The Story of a Writer: Part 5

Of all the turning points you will experience in your quest as a writer, one stands out on the road map toward true meaning: the Climax.

Without your Climax, you have no story.

In Aristotle's words, an ending must be both "Inevitable and unexpected." Unexpected in the sense that as your Inciting Incident occurred, anything and everything as a writer seemed possible. Inevitable in that at Climax, as you look back through your journey, it should seem that the route you chose was the only path.

It need not be full of noise and violence,

rather, it should be full of meaning.

 

In storytelling, meaning produces emotion. Not money, not awards, not movie stars or lush photography.

This is your journey. You are writer and protagonist. You must both chart and ultimately walk your course.

Choose one that has meaning.”

 

 

 

Let me know what you think, David Alan Binder

Being Rejected can be Good for You

posted Apr 11, 2019, 5:13 PM by David Alan Binder

Being Rejected can be Good for You

 

Read on, Dear Writers and Dear Readers, please let us learn together how to face the inevitable rejection letters (emails).

 

We all get them and loathe them; however, according to this article in the NBC News Lifestyle section it can actually help us.  It can then propel us to succeed. 

Yes!  That is what we all want is…to succeed!

 

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/why-getting-rejected-can-actually-help-you-succeed-life-ncna984966

 

 

Let me know your thoughts on this article or any others I publish.

 

Yours, David Alan Binder

 

Jim DeFelice interview with David Alan Binder

posted Apr 10, 2019, 3:59 PM by David Alan Binder

Jim DeFelice interview with David Alan Binder

 Dear Writers and Dear Readers, you have got to read the whole interview below.  Especially the part about some publishers panning him while some wanted the same book and thought it was great.  Funny, how that works.

His bio from his website:

A master storyteller, NY Times Bestselling author Jim DeFelice is known for his vivid, raw, and powerful portrayals of modern American military heroes: from Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's iconic memoir American Sniper  (the #1 NY Times Bestseller made into a film starring Bradley Cooper), to a groundbreaking biography on America's last five-star General, Omar Bradley: General at War.

In his newest popular history, West Like Lightning, DeFelice resurrects the heroes of the Old West to recreate the sweeping drama of the American frontier's most audacious enterprise: the legendary Pony Express.  A meticulous researcher, DeFelice drove the entire two thousand mile stretch of the original Pony Express trail from Sacramento, California to St. Jo, Missouri. Along the way, he talked with museum curators, local historians, and reenactors, and tracked down original documents to convey the full scope of the historic enterprise against the wider background of the U.S. Postal Service, American finance, the Gold Rush, and the impending Civil War.

Delving deeply into the human experience of war, history, geopolitics, and cutting edge technology, DeFelice has written on a wide range of subject matter. His novels run the gamut from spy thrillers set during the American Revolution (The Silver Bullet) to futuristic techno-thrillers (The Helios Conspiracy and Threat Level Black). His non-fiction military histories capture the WWII-era in Rangers At Dieppe and the current Iraqi and Afghanistan wars in two memoirs Code Name: Johnny Walker and Fighting Blind, along with the critically acclaimed novel,  Leopards Kill.

 American Wife (which DeFelice wrote with Chris Kyle's widow Taya after he was tragically murdered) is slated to be made into an upcoming television miniseries for ABC with Jim as consulting producer, while Code Name: Johnny Walker is being developed as a movie. DeFelice’s co-written series Dreamland(with Dale Brown) and Rogue Warrior (with SEAL Team 6 ‘daddy’ Richard Marcinko) are among the best-selling books in their genre  DeFelice also helped create and wrote the storylines for several video games, most notably Ace Combat: Assault Horizon and Afro Samurai.

 

His links:

www.jimdefelice.com

 

https://www.amazon.com/Jim-DeFelice/e/B001ILHFAS?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1554394772&sr=8-1

 

https://twitter.com/JimDeFelice

 

https://www.facebook.com/jimdefeliceauthor/

 

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name? 

Dee-Full-Lease

Actually, my name has been mispronounced a lot. My favorite – “Dee-Full-icious.”

Is that the name of a writer or bubblegum?

 

2.     Where are you currently living?

 

New York’s Hudson Valley (north of NY City)

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

 

With luck, you learn something new every day – about the world or yourself, or sometimes both.

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

 

I don’t think it’s a quirk necessarily, but I think one thing you have to learn is how to deal with frustration. Breaking furniture is very therapeutic, and often helpful, but ultimately fairly expensive. Do it judiciously.

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

 

Experiences can be all over the board in both cases. Whatever you’re doing, the first time is going to be a huge learning experience, and probably a roller coaster of emotions. It will be somewhat easier if you look at it as the start of a long-term process, kind of like a first job.

I’d say “first love” but most of those are doomed.

 

a.      Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they located?

 

I’ve published with all the big NY houses, and some of the smaller ones as well.

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

 

I think to some extent eBooks can level the playing field in terms of getting the book into the hands of a reader; it’s easier physically, certainly. But there are so many different variations and preferences it’d be foolish to single any one thing out.

I wouldn’t negate Marshall McLuhan’s “the medium is the message” observation, but in most cases the core of the book, the story itself, will be the same no matter the package it’s purchased in.

 

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

 

There are no secrets. Just keep at it. Every day.

 

8.     How did you or would you suggest acquire an agent?  Any tips for new writers on getting one?

 

Depends on your goal. If you’re looking at big commercial publishers, then an agent will be pretty useful.

There are no magic bullets. If you’re just starting out in fiction, you have to write the whole book first, polish it, etc. But the hardest thing will be to remember that a rejection is not a rejection of you personally. Even if you realize that intellectually, accepting it emotionally may be difficult.

My “first” published novel was actually my second and a half – the first one made the rounds for over a year, with a lot of nibbles but no bites. I was working on the second when I got stuck; trying to break out of the jam, I started something completely different. That can be a recipe for disaster, but in this case, the new idea caught fire; I wrote it quickly and had great luck finding an agent within weeks. Things went incredibly fast.

But the thing is, the week I went to sign the contract, I got a letter from another agent I’d queried telling me the book was unpublishable.

I’m glad he took his time getting back to me.

 

9.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

 

Think about the process of writing in two parts – art and business. Art is the creating part, frustrating and rewarding entirely on its own. Selling/publishing/promoting the book is business, a whole different thing.

If you’re starting to write your first book, forget about the business part. Focus on the art. Put in everything you know, then go back and rewrite it with everything you’ve learned along the way.

Hold on to that feeling of accomplishment and elation and everything else when you’re done – that’s your highest reward.

After you’ve savored that, you can worry about the business end.

 

10.                        What was one of the most surprising things you learned with your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

 

How long things take. “Next week” in publishing means next month. Or maybe the month after that. Unless the holidays are coming up. Or it’s summer. Or there are thirty-one days in the month.

Of course, when the publisher finds that they have a tight schedule, the two weeks you were supposed to have to go through the galleys becomes three days. And don’t get me started about the copy edit.

 

11.                        How many books have you written?

 

I’m not really sure. According to the publicist, over fifty adult books, and thirty children’s titles.

 

12.                        Do you have any tricks or tips to help others become a better writer (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

 

The only worthwhile advice about writing is DO IT.

Aside from that, I think it’s important to find a balance between love and hate when you work on the book. Re-reading/re-editing/re-writing your manuscript can be hell. Know that it’s never as good as the day you finish the first draft, and never as bad as the first time you look at the copy edit.

 

13.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

 

Always look for more trouble.

 

14.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

 

One of my friends was in the bookstore earlier and pulled it out and faced it on the shelf.

 

Hopefully, it’s the subject and the writing. But I wouldn’t understate the importance of things like the cover and the publicity, etc., in getting it noticed.

 

15.                        What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

 

I don’t do anything unconventional, really.

I think a lot of writers are naturally shy and have to work pretty hard to get over that; that’s a personal thing. But don’t judge either yourself or your book by the size of the crowd at the book signing.

 

16.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

 

I think conditions have changed so much since I started publishing that whatever I have to say on the business side would be completely irrelevant.

 

As far as writing itself goes, I would have more faith in myself – or maybe just naiveté –at a younger age.

 

17.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

 

Time to make more coffee.

 

18.                        Anything else you would like to say?

On the one hand, you can’t take yourself too seriously if you want to get better; you have to stay curious and inventive and willing to poke holes in your ego as well as the universe.

On the other hand, everybody’s got an opinion. And haters are going to hate.

I think it was my last novel that was utterly panned in one of the trade publications. The following week, a rival declared it one of the best books of the year.

So there you go.

Robert McKee: The Story of a Writer: Part 4

posted Apr 7, 2019, 7:14 PM by David Alan Binder

Robert McKee: The Story of a Writer: Part 4

Robert McKee emailed me this:

 

“The Story of a Writer: Part 4

Your story as a writer began with an Inciting Incident, sparking a desire to put to page, stage or screen a universal truth of the world, a unique understanding that "life is like this."

As the protagonist in your story as a writer,

it's time to make your crisis decision.

Many writers, dreading the awareness of how they do what they do will cripple their spontaneity, never study the craft. Instead they march along their own path in a lockstep of unconscious habit, thinking it's instinct. They put in long, tough days, for no matter how it's taken, the writer's road is never smooth. But in their secret selves, they know they're just taking their talent for a walk.

Which path will you take?

This moment of opportunity is the point of greatest tension in your journey as you sense the question 'how will this turn out' will be answered out of the next action.

Will you pursue your story to its final chapter and take your career in a direction many writers fear?”

 

Stay tuned there may be a part 5

Another episode from Robert McKee

posted Apr 3, 2019, 6:57 PM by David Alan Binder

Another episode from Robert McKee

Robert McKee, who makes regular appearances, showcased by yours truly:

“The Story of a Writer: Part 3

Human nature is conservative. We never do more than we have to, expend any energy we don't have to, and most importantly we never take any risks we don't have to. Why do anything the hard way if we can get what we want the easy way?

But the journey of a writer is never easy.

No matter your chosen medium, remember this: it will take you ten years to master your art. Ten years of unforgiving, relentless and thankless work, dawn until dusk.

That's ten years of turning off your phone during work hours. Ten years of ignoring social media. Neglecting friendships and relationships. A decade of headaches as you sweat your heart and soul onto the keyboard. Endless hours in the library, toiling as you research worlds old and new in search of mastery of your craft.

Ten years of rejection.

Writing is more than time and talent. This quest requires dedication of heart and a singularity of purpose. But more than this, it requires sacrifice.

What are you willing to sacrifice to achieve your goals?”

 

Something to think about, David Alan Binder

Writing has Knowledge

posted Mar 31, 2019, 9:51 AM by David Alan Binder

Writing has Knowledge

 

More wisdom from “The Writer’s Craft Book”

 

“We do not write in order to be understood, we write in order to understand.”  C. Day Lewis, essayist

 

These quotes will nourish us, give us food for thought and help us to understand what we are dealing with and how we are thinking.

 

“One thing that is always with the writer – no matter how long [they] have written or how good [they are] – is the continuing process of learning how to write.”  Flannery O’ Connor, novelist

 

The book goes on to say, that literally the only way to learn to write is by writing, just doing it.

 

I really appreciate each of you, Dear Writers and Dear Readers.

If you have any topics you’d like me to cover just drop me a line at ab3ring @ juno dot com or dalanbinder @ gmail dot com

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks, A Think Piece by David Alan Binder

 

Nancy Fulton interview with David Alan Binder

posted Mar 28, 2019, 10:30 AM by David Alan Binder

Nancy Fulton interview with David Alan Binder

 

 

www.FortunateMonsters.com: My Novel. Do you have to love your kid less just because he’s a genetic monster engineered by a madman?

https://www.amazon.com/Nancy-Fulton/e/B0140CH88K/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1545878434&sr=1-2 : Several works I’ve written including some I wrote with Judd Nelson, who is an amazing writer.

www.audioron.com: Several AudioDramas and lectures to support working creatives.

www.nancyfultonmeetups.com: My live online and face to face events and resources for writers, screenwriters, producers, and performers.

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name? 

It’s Nancy Fulton :)

 

2.     Where are you currently living?

I live in Santa Monica. It’s about 20 minutes from downtown Hollywood on a good day, and it is an hour and a half on a bad one.

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

I have learned so many strange things.

 

My mother was a journalist and she taught me to read by teaching me to write.  We would write stories then I’d read them aloud.  I think I’ve learned that’s the best way to teach kids to read and write, to make up stories and to tell them.

 

I’ve learned that great works of both fact and fiction are works of madness, and what the works capture is that madness. 

 

Noah Webster’s demented idea that he could find and define all the words, or Roget’s crazy notion that he could accurately depict families of words, or Macfarquhar, Bell, and Smellie’s Encyclopedia Britannica. Did they really believe they could tell everyone everything?

 

All these folks were doing something insane, started something they would never see the end of, and happily invested their lives creating something almost no one could be expected to want. 

 

Lolita, Hamlet, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, To Kill a Mockingbird, Interview with a Vampire, a Streetcar Named Desire, Heart of Darkness, and The Shining. Having read those books, it seems clear those authors were out of their minds. They were often  lost in despair and living in fiction because their real world was intolerable.

 

It’s crazy to write. It’s crazy to create. It’s crazy to be driven by the need to say something you feel is “true” when there are dishes to wash, kids to feed, jobs to go to. 

 

We should all be doing other things . . .

 

But something about that madness is  uniquely human and I think the need to create and share what we feel is our salvation in our darkest hours.

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

Left to my own devices I can easily give multiple characters in a work names that start with the same letter.

 

I use the same first names in multiple books.  David, for example. There’s a name you’ll find a lot in my books. I know almost no David’s . . . but I write about David’s all the time.

 

In the real world, I have a hard time with names as well. I can meet someone on the street and remember everything about the projects they are working on, how many kids they have, and where they grew up without remembering their first and last names.

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

I wrote training materials and computer manuals for many years and worked for a lot of publishers. In the 1990’s I launched an online training site where people paid to subscribe to my work, and since then I’ve mostly self-published.

I’m not allergic to working with a publisher; it’s just been easier to sell my work directly to audiences because I had many rounded up.

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

I mostly sell eBooks, access to videos, and occasional audio recordings of interviews, lectures, and stories these days.  I don’t sell print works because, by and large, people don’t want to buy them. I earn more when they by electronic media and it also saves trees.  

 

I used to love print books, but now I read and listen to almost everything on my phone. So I think this is a pretty standard trend.

 

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

People think that what makes a writer rich is their work.  Their book, their screenplay, their stage play, etc.

 

But writers become wealthy when they know their audience and their audience knows them.   When 10,000 people have found you, and happily buy whatever you sell, you can keep yourself gainfully employed writing whatever you want. 

 

Publishing is as easy as creating a pretty PDF or a beautiful audio file and making it available for sale. You are a professional writer when people pay for your work.

 

8.     How did you or would you suggest acquire an agent?  Any tips for new writers on getting one?

Well, there are few things to think about.  There’s often a notion that an agent is going to spend a lot of time pitching you and your work to publishers. And they will if you have a lot of finished work to pitch and you have proven that a certain kind of reader really loves your work.

When you have 10,000 rabid fans who love everything you write and you have written several works you haven’t sold, you’ll be able to contact most agents and get a great response. 

But, at that point, you can also just contact editors and publishers who cater to the kind of people who love your work. You will have demonstrated your economic value to the world at large and you’ll have lots of content to sell.

It’s possible to get an agent with just a single great book and with no following at all. I’ve known people who have done that. But the deals they get haven’t been good enough to sustain the author as a writer in most cases. 

 

9.     Do you have any suggestions or help for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Set up a website with your pen name. It’s best if your name is unique.  MaryWilcoxJones.com will work better than MaryJones.com because there are a lot of people named Mary Jones in the world and when a reader can’t find you, they can’t become a fan.

Write several works and post them on your website. Make it so readers have to give you an email address to get each story. This is how you build the list of 10,000. The first works you write you give away in return for an email address. Later you can email them to tell them about works they can buy. You may find, at this point, that delivering books using a platform like Gumroad.com works best because you make more money and every customer you acquire becomes part of your mailing list.

When you sell through Amazon and other platforms, you have no direct relationship with your reader.  That’s bad for them and for you.

10.                        What was one of the most surprising things you learned with your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

I had never wanted a writing partner. I hated writing with other people. But one day a really remarkable guy, a seasoned creative professional I’d admired for many years, liked a story well enough to work on it with me.  Now Judd Nelson and I share many works. It is possible for a creative collaboration to be effortless, joyful, and transformative. That’s something you could never have told me.

11.                        How many books have you written?

Novels and graphic novels, some under pseudonyms, nine I think. Screenplays, short, long, and series, over a hundred. Stage plays, three. Audiodramas, more than a dozen. Non-fiction books and training manuals of all kinds, hundreds. I write, literally, all the time.

 

12.                        Do you have any tricks or tips to help others become a better writer (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Don’t edit while you write. Get the story on page as clearly and accurately as you can, then go back and edit. Writing is a visionary process and trying to edit while you do it is disabling.

 

That said, some writers have an entirely different process. They can’t have chapter one filled with errors and write a good chapter two.  So experimentation is required to figure out what lets you move efficiently through a story from beginning to end.

 

13.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

These days it seems clear to me that character is destiny.  Your characters will provide their own twists if they are driven people actively trying to achieve their goals.

Characters like Walter White from Breaking Bad or Don Draper from Mad Men bring the drama by their very nature. And the characters who hang out with them are necessarily driven too, because if they weren’t they’d have wandered off to hang out with calmer people.

I don’t, personally, like books that teach a recipe for stories.

Even the Hero’s Journey is less than helpful I find. I can finish a book or a screenplay and look back and see the plot points happening at the right times, but I don’t make them happen. And sometimes I like works that break the rules. 

I often like a writer’s first draft better than their last.

14.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

A unique madness. The first time you run into Dexter you think, “I’ve never seen this character before. The maniacal serial killer that kills other serial killers. Jesus, that’s a good idea.” 

 

Harry Potter, a boy wizard, a boy exiled from a magical world who is rediscovered by it and ultimately saves it from a villain so afraid of dying he shredded himself into a 7 headed hydra.  “Well, that’s new.  Do evil people tear themselves apart because they are afraid to die? I’ll have to think about that.”

 

15.                        What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

         I don’t know that I do anything radical really.

 

16.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

I don’t know if I have anything, I’d do differently. I’ve spent a lifetime writing . . .

 

17.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

Carpe Diem.

Life is very short and death knocks on every door.  So work hard to be really nice to people, especially those you love. Tell them you love them, show them you care about them, because there will come a day when you can’t do that because you are gone or they are gone.

Do the stuff you care the most about and burn the candle at both ends if you have to.  I totally “get” people who stay up until 3am to write and go to work at 6am then next morning because they have to pay the bills.

 

18.                        Anything else you would like to say?

This was a fun interview.  I hope some of the resources I’ve linked to will prove interesting or useful. I think hearing writers talk about their inner lives is one of the most interesting and encouraging experiences. I think the interviews you do are really cool . . . 

Incompetence

posted Mar 26, 2019, 3:43 PM by David Alan Binder

Incompetence

 

Seth Godin has written a small article that caught my attention (actually he emailed this to me and I think it bears being passed along to you, Dear Writers and Dear Readers.)

 

“At some point, grown-ups get tired of the feeling that accompanies growth and learning.

We start calling that feeling, “incompetence.”

We’re not good at the new software, we resist a brainstorming session for a new way to solve a problem, we never did bother to learn to juggle…

Not because we don’t want the outcomes, but because the journey promises to be difficult. Difficult in the sense that we’ll feel incompetent.

Which accompanies all growth.

First we realize something can be done.

[Second] Then we realize we can’t do it.

[or we can barely do it maybe need some help for a while]

And finally, we get better at it.

It’s the second step that messes with us.”

If you care enough to make a difference, if you care enough to get better–you should care enough to experience incompetence again.”

 

I get this feeling a lot when I am writing.  Sometimes a subject, sometimes a certain article, sometimes one step in a process (there are so many steps and it can be hard to master them all).

 

Most of us are good readers and good writers, but do we have the skills or are we incompetent?

 

No, we have never been incompetent; we are just at the beginning stages of learning.

 

NEVER, call yourself or others incompetent.

 

You are just learning, same as you did when crawling and toddling.  That is called cute in your younger years.

 

When you are older, maybe it is not cute, but it certainly takes time in the complicated life we live to master the TV remote, the computer, a certain software, even Google search has a learning curve of how to phrase your search.

 

It is just a learning curve.  Going into a 60 mile an hour curve at 45 mph is not incompetence, it is just getting familiar when speed, gas pedal manipulation, steering, pavement variables, engine RPMs, weather, other drivers, even the particular vehicle.  In yours maybe you can do it at full speed, in another vehicle it makes sense to be careful and take your time until you get used to that vehicle.

 

After all, well all have our own learning speeds.  Know what yours is and be comfortable with it.

 

A Think Piece by David Alan Binder

 

Writing has Power

posted Mar 24, 2019, 9:49 AM by David Alan Binder   [ updated Mar 24, 2019, 9:50 AM ]

Writing has Power

 

Donald Murray, the writer and educator said:

“Writing can give you power, for we live in a complicated technological society, and those people who can collect information, order it into significant meaning, and then communicate it to others will influence the course of events within the town or nation, school or university, company or corporation.”

 

(This came from the book, “The Writer’s Craft, idea to expression”, that I am currently studying.  Picture below.)


 

 

That is one powerful statement.  We somehow knew this deep down inside us and that propels us into this state of agitation, of angst, of this is one thing I have to do no matter what else I do in life; I HAVE TO DO THIS WRITING THING!

 

Be more powerful than a superhero, be more powerful than a leader of a nation, be more powerful than any celebrity; simply by using your words carefully and articulating with coherence and meaning to your readers.

 

This says it all.  Thanks for reading and writing, my Dear Writers and Readers.

 

A Think Piece by David Alan Binder

 

1-10 of 820

Comments