01c-INTERVIEWS & FORUM (blog)

It is best to just scroll down and you will see the interviews and forums in order-newest at top.
OR 
If you are looking for a specific interview use 
Ctrl-F and enter full or partial author name.


Christoph Burmeister interview with David Alan Binder

posted by David Alan Binder

Christoph Burmeister interview with David Alan Binder

 

Links:

Website: http://christophburmeister.com/index.html

My book is available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/POETIC-MURDERER-Christoph-Burmeister-ebook/dp/B078P1TLMN/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1528980694&sr=8-1&keywords=the+poetic+murderer

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38251105-the-poetic-murderer?ac=1&from_search=true



1.     Where are you currently living?

Copenhagen, Denmark.

 

2.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

          Style is a continuous distillation. How can I be me? Honestly expressing     myself. No lies. That’s the bottom line of art to me.

 

3.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

          Definitely writing. But I also do a bit of illustration if decency permits.

 

4.     Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they located?

 

                   i2i Publishing. Manchester, UK.

 

5.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

          Persistence. Stand for something. Do ask yourself this question: Why do I   write?

 

6.     So what are you standing for?

          I am a young fiction writer, who believes that everybody should follow their        dream.

 

7.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

          Develop your own style. Finding your own style is everything. Let me put it         that way: you’re not Andy Warhol, because you hang gay at the wall, so          you’ve to figure out what you want to say and how you’re going to say it…           read and write until the words are fly.

8.     How many books have you written?

         Two. The next one is coming soon.

 

9.     Do you have any tricks or tips to help others become a better writer (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

          Find your sweet-spot for getting into a state of flow. There’s a word in        Denmark called hygge, which is a state of happiness and contentment that         one feels in a cozy, relaxing environment. For me, hygge is sitting at my          secret spot and listening to a fine piece of music. Let my mind slowly drift         away to a fantasy. Once there, the words flow naturally.        

 

10.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

Just let your fantasy carry you beyond rational thought and self-control.

11.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

          An unaesthetic fear of the unknown haunts us, namely the unforeseen. A    fear that shapes our lives. No human can unlearn to fear; we all have to learn    how to deal with it. By picking up The Poetic Murderer, the reader travels a     new route and learns to lead a fearless life by trusting in the own reality.

         

          With that said, if you liked The Alchemist, you’ll love The Poetic      Murderer.

 

12.                        What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

          I’ve brewed the beer to the novel (Øloquent), which is part of the story, and         it’s served at readings or other events.     

 

13.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

          Don’t listen so much to what other people try to tell you, even though        sometimes it might be helpful, in the end it’s more important to trust in        yourself. 

 

14.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

There’s nothing new under the sun, don’t take yourself too seriously, and have fun.

 

15.                        Anything else you would like to say?

Please visit my website: http://christophburmeister.com/index.html

Sharon Marchisello interview with David Alan Binder

posted Jun 14, 2018, 3:23 PM by David Alan Binder

Sharon Marchisello interview with David Alan Binder

Bio from her website:  Sharon Marchisello is the author of Going Home (2014, Sunbury Press), a murder mystery inspired by her own mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease. She also wrote “The Ghost on Timber Way,” part of a short story anthology featuring fellow Sisters in Crime members, and a personal finance e-book entitled Live Cheaply, Be Happy, Grow Wealthy. Sharon grew up in Tyler, Texas, and earned her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Houston in French and English. She studied for a year in Tours, France, on a Rotary scholarship and then moved to Los Angeles where she earned a Masters in Professional Writing at the University of Southern California. 

Links:

Blog:  http://sharonmarchisello.blogspot.com/

Website:  https://smarchisello.wordpress.com/

Purchase links:  https://www.sunburypressstore.com/Going-Home-9781620064382.htm

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/310634

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Sharon-Marchisello/e/B00NH6N4WK/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4297807.Sharon_Marchisello

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/SLMarchisello

https://www.facebook.com/Live-Cheaply-Be-Happy-Grow-Wealthy-494073360780648/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SLMarchisello

Link to Alzheimer's page: http://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2018/General?px=8910473&pg=personal&fr_id=11155

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name? 

My last name, Marchisello, is Italian, so the "ch" is pronounced with a "k" sound.

 

2.     Where are you currently living?

Currently, I'm living in Peachtree City, which is a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia.

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

You get better with practice and also by sharing your work with others and listening to feedback.

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

I tend to edit too much as I write, which makes me very slow. (Not sure that qualifies as interesting!)

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

I really don't know much about self-publishing, even though I did self-publish an e-book about personal finance, Live Cheaply, Be Happy, Grow Wealthy, on smashwords. I chose self-publishing for that book because traditional publishing takes forever. Even if you get a contract right away, it could be a year or more before the book is released. I figured I'd have to rewrite the book a few times to keep the information current.

 

For my fiction, I prefer the traditional publishing route. And it took me 10 years from the time I started writing my mystery novel, Going Home, until it was published.

 

a.      Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they located?

Going Home was published by Sunbury Press. They are located in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

I prefer to read print books, but I know eBooks are popular so every author has to be available in that medium.

 

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

I wish I did! I think a lot of it is about building relationships and being in the right place at the right time. (And also, writing a great book.)

 

8.     How did you or would you suggest acquiring an agent?  Any tips for new writers on getting one?

I don't currently have an agent. But I think the best way to get one is to go to conferences and meet them face to face, get to know them as people rather than trying to hard-sell them. And then follow up later with a query, referencing the fact that you met, so your pitch will stand out of the pile. (And do some research first, so you can focus on agents who represent the type of material you write.)

 

9.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Don't get too attached to anything you write; be willing to cut even your most brilliant passages if they're not working for the story. (I'm sure this tip has been offered elsewhere.)

10.                        What was one of the most surprising things you learned with your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

When I first started writing, I thought the objective was to get published. Then I'd be able to sit back, count the money rolling in, and write more books. With so much competition out there, self-marketing is essential if you want to sell books. Publication is just the beginning. In fact, marketing should start long before publication.

11.                        How many books have you written?

I completed four novels before Going Home, and I've abandoned many more. Since the publication of Going Home in 2014, I've started three more novels and completed one, Secrets of the Galapagos, which I'm currently shopping around.

 

12.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

Have two or three seemingly unrelated plots going, and then connect them.

13.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

The cover. I like the cover the designer at Sunbury Press created for Going Home, but neither she nor I realized at the time the significance of the colors she used. Going Home is a murder mystery inspired by my mother's battle with Alzheimer's disease. After the book came out, I participated in the Alzheimer's Walk and I learned that my book cover contains all four of the Alzheimer's colors: purple (for those who have lost a loved one to Alzheimer's), yellow (for caregivers), blue (for people suffering from Alzheimer's), and orange (for those who are not directly affected, but who support the fight for a cure).

 

14.                        What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

For the past two years, I have offered free copies of Going Home at Alzheimer's fundraisers in exchange for a donation to the Alzheimer's Walk, and I'll be doing it again this year. It's not a good way to make money, as I donate all the proceeds, but I think it has helped me gain more readers. Lots of people have bought the book because the funds are going to charity, where they ordinarily would not have given it a second look. Collecting money for a good cause is more satisfying to me than doing a giveaway in hope of getting new readers.

 

15.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

I would have started marketing earlier. It took me so long to get published, and when I finally got a contract, I was still afraid something would go wrong and my book would never really come out. So, I didn't tell many people I'd sold my manuscript until the book was published. If I had it to do over, I'd have built a website, posted about the writing/publication process on social media, asked for blurbs, sent out advance review copies, lined up speaking engagements, and had a much more spectacular launch.

 

16.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

Prepare for the future, but don't forget to enjoy today, because you never know how long you have.

 

17.                        Anything else you would like to say?

Thanks for the opportunity! My personal page for this year's Alzheimer's Walk is up now, if any of your readers are interested in receiving a copy of Going Home in exchange for a donation:

http://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2018/General?px=8910473&pg=personal&fr_id=11155

Natasha Wing interview with David Alan Binder

posted Jun 12, 2018, 3:37 PM by David Alan Binder

Natasha Wing interview with David Alan Binder

Shortened bio from her website:  It wasn’t until after college, when I was working at my own small public relations agency, that I decided I really wanted to write children’s books. I was so inspired by the magic that happens when reading a story that I wanted to see if my active imagination could create magical moments for kids all over the world. So I started writing. Luckily, I sold my first manuscript, Hippity Hop, Frog on Top, in 1992.  I’ve been writing ever since.

Links:

Facebook:    https://www.facebook.com/natashawingbooks/

Website:        www.natashawing.com

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name? 

Nah – tah - sha

 

2.     Where are you currently living?

Colorado

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

To be flexible. Topic needs change. Word count changes. New genres are added. So hang in there!

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

I tend to backfill my Night Before stories when I write them. I come up with images and rhymes then puzzle piece them together versus following a plotline.

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

I’m mostly traditionally published but I have done two self-published books, one for adults and one for children. If I was both author/illustrator I may try another self-published book.

a.      Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they located?

I have several publishers – Grosset & Dunlap, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sterling, Henry Holt, Atheneum – that are in New York City.

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

I don’t own any e-readers so I prefer printed books over electronic. I like looking at the cover, flipping pages and using bookmarks. I even try to match the art on the bookmark with the type of book I’m reading.

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

Think of it as a people business and go out an meet people in the business! Attend workshops, writers’ organizations meetings, critique groups and chat groups.

 

8.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Read current picture books to see what the industry is producing versus classic ones then hope yours becomes a classic. For new writers I’d say read lots of examples of the type of book you are wanting to write. But as a skilled writer I try NOT to read other’s works so as not to be influenced by their writing voice. I read them AFTER I finish my draft to make sure I don’t repeat information, especially when it’s nonfiction.

9.     What was one of the most surprising things you learned with your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

Most surprising thing I learned is that I’m pretty darn good at watercolor portraits of dogs! I haven’t illustrated my own books yet, but hoping to someday. This discovery happened between agents and when I was thinking of giving up on writing kids books. So I turned back to my childhood and started painting.

10.                        How many books have you written?  

I’ve written over 125 but published 32.

11.                        Do you have any tricks or tips to help others become a better writer (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Look at the verbs you are using and replace blah ones with more active and           interesting ones.

 

12.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

One fun thing to do is to bring your story to a school visit and ask the kids how they would end the story. You’ll get some interesting ideas!

13.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

Illustrations can be so unique that they catch a buyer’s attention on the rack. But heart makes it become a child’s favorite.

 

14.                        What are some ways in which you promote your work?

For Bagel in Love I had a dress designed by a university fashion student inspired by characters and end pages from the book, and I wear it to literary events, conferences, and school visits. It’s quite memorable.

 

15.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

I would have done more self-published poetry books and joke books.

 

16.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

If you hang in there long enough, the industry will come around to your forward thinking. 

Think Responsibly

posted Jun 7, 2018, 3:29 PM by David Alan Binder

Think Responsibly

 

Too many people are not in touch with their emotions.  I used to be not in touch with my emotions.  Or when I did feel emotion it was fear but rather than admit it I got angry.

 

Find an emotion wheel!

 

Find your emotion that you are feeling on that emotion wheel and then find that ROOT emotion connected to the emotion you are feeling.

 

How does this help you to become a better writer or a better you?  There is no such thing as better!  There is only different!

That is deep thinking right there.  There is no such thing as better.  Better is not quantifiable.  Anything you change for the better isn’t better it is only different.  Wrap your head around that and you are getting closer to knowing how to feel about your life, and your everything.

 

Dear Readers and Dear Writers, everything that gets you in touch with yourself helps you to become a different person and that person is the one that is more authentic, that person is one that people will want to get to know and get in touch with.

 

No, I am not always this way.  Sometimes I am different and sometimes I’m not and I can live with that.  Anything I can’t live with then I change.  I never do better; I only change.

 

What do you change?  That is up to you and maybe the feedback you receive MUST come from ONLY TRUSTED and CLOSE friends.

 

Another think piece by David Alan Binder.  All of this is part of thinking responsibly.

 

Mary Beth Magee interview with David Alan Binder

posted Jun 5, 2018, 3:30 PM by David Alan Binder

Mary Beth Magee interview with David Alan Binder

Short bio from her website:  (Mary Beth Magee) I'm a writer, blogger, speaker, teacher, reader, dreamer, gardener, crafter and like Rudyard Kipling's Elephant's Child, I am filled with " 'satiable curiosity." I love the innocence of kids, the affection of animals and the joy of God's creation.

 

My website: www.LOL4.net

My Amazon page: www.amazon.com/author/marybethmagee

My BookBub handle:  @marybethmageewrites

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name? 

Mary Beth Magee – pronounced Muh-gee

2.     Where are you currently living?

South Mississippi – like Mercy McKay (my protagonist) I’ve come home at last.

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

Keep writing, even if it’s not on your main work. The plot may resolve itself in your subconscious while you’re working on something else.

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

I do some of my best story-plotting while bush hogging. Something about the rhythm of the tractor and blades, the aroma of the freshly cut hay and the back and forth patterns of each pass open my thought processes to all sorts of stories.

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

The publisher who accepted my first novel couldn’t work with my timeline for publication. I wanted the book published in my mother’s birth month, since she always encouraged my writing and I wrote the novel in her memory. The date was important enough to me that I declined the contract and self-published. I was glad I did. The publisher was gone within a year.

 

a.      Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they located?

 

My publisher is my own company, BOTR Press, LLC in Poplarville, MS.

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

I don’t believe eBooks will put print books out of existence any time soon. Each mode has a place in the reader’s world. While I love the feeling of a book in my hands, I also have an eReader for those authors who want to send me their book for review in the electronic format.

 

Conventional publishing gives control of my work to someone else. I’ve become very fond of holding those reins myself. Maybe one day, I’ll relinquish control, but not yet. For now, I’ll stay with self-publishing.

 

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

a.      Get published wherever you can. Blogs, magazine or newspaper articles, or letters to the editor all count. Keep copies of those publications. Each piece adds to your credibility as a writer.

b.     Get involved with a group, which will give you meaningful feedback, not just “Wow! Great Job!” but real feedback. Listen to what they say and apply the advice you believe is worthwhile.

c.      Once your book is finished, have at least one person you trust to tell you the truth go through it page by page and make notes. (I have three wonderful beta readers.) Take the advice seriously, but not personally. The book may feel like your child, but you can’t sell it if it isn’t the best it can be.

d.     Attend conferences, which offer pitch sessions and bring your samples with you, along with the pitch for your book.

 

8.     How did you or would you suggest acquire an agent?  Any tips for new writers on getting one?

Conferences offer the best opportunities for acquiring an agent. If a writer wants a mainstream publisher, an agent is a definite necessity. Look for conferences with agent interview periods.

 

9.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

Keep writing, no matter what. Edit, edit and edit again. Don’t show your work to anyone who doesn’t believe in you. Only share with people who have your best interests at heart and will tell you the truth to help you grow. Above all, don’t take feedback on your work as a personal attack. It’s not about you; it’s about your story.

For all of those who think, “I’ll write someday” – SOMEDAY is TODAY! Get started. You can edit a poor first draft. You can’t edit a blank page.

10.                        What was one of the most surprising things you learned with your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

I’ve always thought of myself as a good speller and grammarian. I was amazed at how many things I missed in my multiple readings. We tend to see what we meant to put down, not what actually went down on the page. Thank God for my wonderful and gifted beta readers!

11.                        How many books have you written?

To date, I’ve written two cozy mystery novels (Death in the Daylilies and Ambush at the Arboretum) and one short story collection (Cypress Point Confidences). Two devotional books (Devotions from the Road of Life: Hitting the Road and Devotions from the Road of Life: Devotions for Caregivers), one children’s book (Grandpa’s Mustache), one craft book (Storytime Crafts, Games and Gifts Using Recycled and Inexpensive Items) and one poetry collection (Songs of Childhood, Echoes of Years). I’ve also created five journals (The Storyteller’s Journal, The Rose of Friendship, Getting Started on Your Memoirs, Getting Started in Your Own Kitchen and Devotions from the Road of Life: Caregiver’s Medical Log). So far, I’ve appeared in twelve anthologies on various topics, including two Chicken Soup for the Soul volumes.

12.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

Get to know your cast. Look beyond the physical description to the motives and traumas, the myriad experiences which color their perspectives. As you learn more about them, you’ll find the quirks and flaws, which help to provide you with the twists. Don’t try to force a plot point. Let it happen naturally out of the people and circumstances in your story. Listen to your characters. Human nature brings enough twists of its own.

13.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

Believable behavior by believable people in believable circumstances make a book work for me. Notice I didn’t say realistic, I said believable. When the characters are true to themselves and their values, I can suspend disbelief about realism. All the gritty realism in the world can’t get me past inconsistencies. I’ve been told I achieve believability in my novels and short stories because I keep my characters, imperfect though they are, consistent to their values.

 

14.                        What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

Each of my novels contains a recipe. After all, food plays an important role in Southern life. I give away recipe cards with the recipe and ordering information on the books.

15.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

I would have taken more art when I was younger, so I could do my own illustrations. Finding affordable artists can be difficult.

16.                        What saying or mantra do you live by?

Writing to share God’s light in the world

 

17.                        Anything else you would like to say?

I find writers to be some of the most generous hearted people I’ve ever met. We pull together to help each other. I work hard to give back the same sort of help I’ve been given through the years.

What if you used Kintsugi on your stories?

posted May 31, 2018, 3:30 PM by David Alan Binder

What if you used Kintsugi on your stories?

 

Kintsugi or as it is also called Kintsukuroi means golden repair.

This art is Japanese and it takes the repair of broken pottery to another level.

It is especially useful for the individual that is doing it over the piece of pottery.

Using lacquer that is mixed with gold, silver or platinum in powdered form and using that mixture like a glue to hold broken pieces of pottery together.

It creates two things, one, it uses your concentration and talent to mold a broken piece of pottery back together and it accentuates the “scars” of the repair since that is now part of the pottery’s history.

That very act of concentration on your part re-channels your mind into something useful and purposeful; taking your mind off those life events that may be worrying you or bothering you.  Such as, divorce, a death in the family, or other such troubles.

You won’t forget, not ever, your troubles but your mind is channeled for a span of time away from that brain activity that frankly, gets you nowhere usually.

The Kintsugi technique is 400 years old.  It can be a metaphor for soothing and healing ourselves.


https://image.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/3229253/543321364/stock-photo-repair-of-crack-pottery-tea-cup-horizontal-543321364.jpg

Now let’s apply this principle to story or article writing, Dear Readers and Dear Writers.

Writing channels your mind away from those things that may worry you for a span of time.  And that alone can be so refreshing and reviving and give you a new look at worries.

Those worries are still there.  Those worries; however, are put into the background, are channeled to your subconscious.  So many times, my subconscious has found solutions or a way to think about worries that freed my mind.

You don’t have to use lacquer or glue.  You can use any medium for “repairing” your life and highlighting those scars that make you the person you have become.  Without those “scars”, you’d be a completely different person with a completely different perspective.

Your full potential will be revealed BECAUSE you went through those tough times and marvelously here you still stand in spite of and sometimes because of it.

Imperfection can be a celebration of individuality.

This is a think piece by David Alan Binder. Suggested by an article on NBC News https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/how-japanese-art-technique-kintsugi-can-help-you-be-more-ncna866471

 

 

 

There are other techniques for you to discover. 

Gaman       https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaman_(term)

Yuimaru    https://okinawahai.com/yuima-ru-the-circle/

Eiyoshoku means “nourish your body”

Kansha       https://kanshaforlife.wordpress.com/2012/09/04/kansha-is/

 

You are a Star

posted May 30, 2018, 3:41 PM by David Alan Binder

You are a Star

 

It’s no wonder that we aspire to be a star.  They are so individualistic and yet ever present for all their distance from us.

According to this report from Space.com (located here:

https://www.space.com/40406-gaia-release-color-milky-way-map.html

The ESA (European Space Agency) has 3D mapped over a billion stars.

Their position and brightness, their color, their distance and proper motion, surface temperature and radius and luminosity. (see graphic below)

 

Yes, we all are stars.  Some more luminous, some vary in temp and color and in brightness.  We are connected to each of those stars, Dear Readers and Dear Writers.

We are shooting for them on a daily basis.

 

See you there, in all your glory.

 

Twinkle, twinkle all you stars!

John Lee Dumas interview with David Alan Binder

posted May 24, 2018, 3:28 PM by David Alan Binder

John Lee Dumas interview with David Alan Binder

 

Bio: John Lee Dumas is the host of Entrepreneurs on Fire, an award winning podcast where he interviews inspiring Entrepreneurs every Monday and drops value bombs every Thursday. With over 2000 episodes, 1.3 million listens every month, and seven-figures of annual revenue, JLD is just getting started. Visit EOFire.com to set YOUR Entrepreneurial journey ON FIRE!

 

Website: https://www.eofire.com/

 

1.     Where are you currently living?

Puerto Rico

 

 

2.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be so specific that this most likely will not have been seen elsewhere)?

John says, “There are no new ideas.”  He uses the Pomaduro method. (Wikipedia: “The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks.”  He started with 25 minutes and has used 60 minutes and found 25 too short and 60 too long so he has settled on 42 as being optimal for him.  Also, he uses the Steven Pressfield “The Foolscap Method. (https://stevenpressfield.com/2013/07/the-foolscap-method-2/)

Then after the time is up he rewards himself with surfing the internet, taking a walk or other reward.

3.     How many books have you written?

Five

 

4.     What is one unusual way in which you promote your work?

One way is using Kickstarter for books.  There are not that many books on Kickstarter, and if you have a package of two, three or more then that makes it very unusual.  Also, he may include a visit to Puerto Rico, or a phone / Skype session or like including 10 journals, or a 10 minute podcast so these things make it incredibly unique.

 

 

5.     What saying or mantra do you live by?

F.O.C.U.S   An acronym that means Follow One Course Until Success.

Just take one idea and go all in on that one idea.  If you focus on too many items then they distract from each other.

 

6.     Anything else you would like to say?

He appreciated the time and ability to chat with me.

7.     I also asked him some relevant question for my continuing research into possibly living or retiring in another country.  He reminded me that Puerto Rico is a US territory and does not even require a passport to visit.  It is 3.5 million people who are mostly coastal and the power issues are mainly in the inland mountainous regions.  Act 20 passed about 4 or 5 years ago means that there is only 4% corporate tax, which means high net profit.  If you are making about $250,000 or more then that is quite a savings. 

I asked about bugs and he said he can keep the bay windows open and not have any flying bugs which surprised him.  They do have large iguanas but that they keep their distance.

 

 

What are you working on?

posted May 22, 2018, 3:26 PM by David Alan Binder

What are you working on?

 

We are a study group.  Yes, you and I.  You come here to study, to learn and to grow.

I am constantly reading, listening, and informing myself from books, audios and videos; from various sources.  A few of which are: life coaches (3 of them at once), a neuro-linguistic programming master practitioner, several informational sources about narcissism (about 5), assorted fictional and non-fictional books, a two charisma coaches, a philosopher, and so many more even I am astounded by the quantity.

What this means for both of us is I have scoured the world looking for new ideas, information and how to relate it all.

I take all the mountains of information, sift through it, and produce the best information possible for your consumption.

My investigations into the macabre, the occult, the unusual, the weird, the oddities, the ends of the world and beyond, yield spectacular and inspirational stories and articles.

I have read the Bible cover to cover both Old and New Testaments; plus many cross references and appendages.  I have read Josephus, Steven Covey to Steven King and everything in between.  Marcus Aurelius’ book The Meditations, thousands upon thousands of books.  This is to perfect my art and craft; to be knowledgeable of other authors and their art and craft.

 

Let me help and inspire you.

Write me, Dear Readers and Dear Writers, and let’s get started.

 

Ayn Rand number four

posted May 20, 2018, 11:51 AM by David Alan Binder

Ayn Rand number four

 

This is one of my favorite saying and I first heard it by listening to Cory Wayne, a life coach.

He extolls the virtue of seeing things as they really are.  Not as we’d like them to look.  Not better.  Not worse.  But exactly as they are.  This helps us to evaluate our circumstances with a clear eye.

Clear eyes help us to know exactly the type of situation we are in or have gotten ourselves into and then we can determine the correct way forward.

Clear direction in our lives help us to have better lives.  We all want better lives.

Knowing our situation and ourselves precisely will determine future actions.  I realize that I am not a bestselling author; however, I am taking the steps to being a bestselling author.

If I have a limited vocabulary then my writing will be limited.  If I do not recognize that in myself then I can muddle around trying to write eloquently without getting much of anywhere.

If I see my limitations then I can remove them.  As Mr. Smallwood, my fifth grade teacher would say, “A word to the wise is sufficient.” 

“We can evade reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading reality”  Ayn Rand

 

1-10 of 718

Comments