Magic! Watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat. Nothing up my sleeve. Presto!

posted Oct 2, 2015, 6:20 AM by David Alan Binder   [ updated May 16, 2016, 6:59 AM ]

Magic!  Watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat.  Nothing up my sleeve.  Presto!
 
I don't believe I ever saw Bullwinkle pull a rabbit out of his hat.  (Let me know if he ever did, and no, I did not research it. - Bad me!)  
 
If you ever watched those cartoons on Saturday morning and enjoyed those stories then you are like me and I loved them.  They captivated me, but someone, somewhere was writing those stories I enjoyed.  I have been reading since I was 5 or 6-ish.  Started with Dick and Jane like some of you.  Old school but effective at that time.
 
I have only been reading for a few years in another manner and that is the dissecting manner.  The one where I take what I read and think about what I've read and try to see all the pieces (not words), the pieces that fit, how they fit and why they fit.
 
I could tell you before that time the beginning, middle and ending.  But each Chapter has one, each paragraph has a point, each sentence drives the story, each character gives you a reason to root or jeer at them or they are setting up the story.
 
Each piece is fit and sometimes perfectly into that story puzzle.  So the next time you read dissect it.  See how the pieces fit, why they fit, what their point is and how the story is driven and becomes compelling.
 
Have you ever stopped reading a story?  Just felt like, this is so blah, I can not even finish it, it does not captivate me, entertain me, appeal to me.
 
I've started a few like that.  Those are good examples of how NOT to do I, I imagine, and they are worth dissecting on another level.
 
Take the time to figure out, what would have made this one better.  What could it say to make me continue to read.
 
Once you figure that out you see how those pieces fit.  Diagramming is a good exercise.  Writers need to do it to know their craft inside and out, Dear Writers.
 
Become not just good but a master at what you do.  Mastery is the goal.
 
Let's master this together.
 
Contact me at ab3ring at juno dot com or dalanbinder at gmail dot com

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<title>David Alan Binder – Write Coach, 
Magic!  Watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat.  Nothing up my sleeve.  Presto!
 
I don't believe I ever saw Bullwinkle pull a rabbit out of his hat.  (Let me know if he ever did, and no, I did not research it. - Bad me!)  
 
If you ever watched those cartoons on Saturday morning and enjoyed those stories then you are like me and I loved them.  They captivated me, but someone, somewhere was writing those stories I enjoyed.  I have been reading since I was 5 or 6-ish.  Started with Dick and Jane like some of you.  Old school but effective at that time.
 
I have only been reading for a few years in another manner and that is the dissecting manner.  The one where I take what I read and think about what I've read and try to see all the pieces (not words), the pieces that fit, how they fit and why they fit.
 
I could tell you before that time the beginning, middle and ending.  But each Chapter has one, each paragraph has a point, each sentence drives the story, each character gives you a reason to root or jeer at them or they are setting up the story.
 
Each piece is fit and sometimes perfectly into that story puzzle.  So the next time you read dissect it.  See how the pieces fit, why they fit, what their point is and how the story is driven and becomes compelling.
 
Have you ever stopped reading a story?  Just felt like, this is so blah, I can not even finish it, it does not captivate me, entertain me, appeal to me.
 
I've started a few like that.  Those are good examples of how NOT to do I, I imagine, and they are worth dissecting on another level.
 
Take the time to figure out, what would have made this one better.  What could it say to make me continue to read.
 
Once you figure that out you see how those pieces fit.  Diagramming is a good exercise.  Writers need to do it to know their craft inside and out, Dear Writers.
 
Become not just good but a master at what you do.  Mastery is the goal.
 
Let's master this together.
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<meta name="description=" content="David Alan Binder (aka dalanbinder) provides a blog for Writers, 
Magic!  Watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat.  Nothing up my sleeve.  Presto!
 
I don't believe I ever saw Bullwinkle pull a rabbit out of his hat.  (Let me know if he ever did, and no, I did not research it. - Bad me!)  
 
If you ever watched those cartoons on Saturday morning and enjoyed those stories then you are like me and I loved them.  They captivated me, but someone, somewhere was writing those stories I enjoyed.  I have been reading since I was 5 or 6-ish.  Started with Dick and Jane like some of you.  Old school but effective at that time.
 
I have only been reading for a few years in another manner and that is the dissecting manner.  The one where I take what I read and think about what I've read and try to see all the pieces (not words), the pieces that fit, how they fit and why they fit.
 
I could tell you before that time the beginning, middle and ending.  But each Chapter has one, each paragraph has a point, each sentence drives the story, each character gives you a reason to root or jeer at them or they are setting up the story.
 
Each piece is fit and sometimes perfectly into that story puzzle.  So the next time you read dissect it.  See how the pieces fit, why they fit, what their point is and how the story is driven and becomes compelling.
 
Have you ever stopped reading a story?  Just felt like, this is so blah, I can not even finish it, it does not captivate me, entertain me, appeal to me.
 
I've started a few like that.  Those are good examples of how NOT to do I, I imagine, and they are worth dissecting on another level.
 
Take the time to figure out, what would have made this one better.  What could it say to make me continue to read.
 
Once you figure that out you see how those pieces fit.  Diagramming is a good exercise.  Writers need to do it to know their craft inside and out, Dear Writers.
 
Become not just good but a master at what you do.  Mastery is the goal.
 
Let's master this together.
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