Joe Broadmeadow interview with David Alan Binder

posted Mar 6, 2016, 7:41 AM by David Alan Binder   [ updated May 16, 2016, 6:28 AM ]

Joe Broadmeadow interview with David Alan Binder

 

 

Website:      http://joebroadmeadow.wix.com/joe-broadmeadow

 

His books:            Collision Course   Silenced Justice  Spirit of the Trail (An Appalachian Trail short story)          Saving the Last Dragon  

 

His soon to be released books;          A Change of Hate (Spring 2016)  S.E.E.D (Fall 2016)

 

Amazon:     http://www.amazon.com/Joe-Broadmeadow/e/B00OWPE9GU

 

 

1.     How do you pronounce your name (only answer if appropriate)? 

a.     The name is easy, although you would be surprised at how people massacre it. It is an Irish surname, despite the Native American connotations. So just read it as plain language, Broadmeadow

 

2.     Where are you currently living?

a.     Lincoln, RI.  A small town in the smallest state in the US

 

3.     What is the most important thing that you have learned in your writing experience, so far?

a.     Writing is easy. Editing is hard. If you combine an interesting twist on a story (there are indeed few things new under the sun), add in thoughtful and colorful writing, and then edit with vengeance a book will emerge. Anything worthwhile requires effort. The more effort the more worthwhile it will become.

 

 

4.     What would you say is your most interesting writing, publishing, editing or illustrating quirk?

a.     I have to force myself to separate my writing from my editing. I use a variety of programs to write (primarily Scrivener and Word) so I turn off the auto-correct functions to stop my compunction to fix errors. It interrupts the creativity.

 

 

5.     Tell us your insights on self-publish or use a publisher?

a.     For my first three books and one short story I self-published. I wanted to get a feel for the publishing world through my own experiences. I am “let me figure it out on my own” person. Now that I have the experience of what works in the marketplace, and what people appreciate as good writing, I am focusing on selling my next work through an agent. It will take longer but I am willing to make that effort and see it through.

 

b.     Who is the name of your publisher and in what city are they?

 

                                                             i.      Right now I publish through Createspace for print and Kindle Direct Publishing for eBooks.

 

 

6.     Any insights eBooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

a.     EBooks are the way of the future. Print books are good for those diehards that have not quite embraced digital. Much like film photography, as the technology improves I think printed books will fade. But that it a long way in the future.

 

 

7.     Do you have any secret tips for writers on getting a book published?

a.     That’s easy. Write a great book. If you put the effort into writing well, which means reading everything you get your hands on and editing with vengeance as I said before. Talent is important, but grammar, spelling, concise and colorful writing is equally important.

         

 

 

8.     How did you or would you suggest acquire an agent?  Any tips for new writers on getting one?

a.     Use the various sources available to identify agents that represent you genre. Target them. Most importantly, follow the submission requirements to the letter.

 

 

9.     Do you have any suggestions or helps for new writers (please be specific and informational as possible)?

a.     Sit down and write. “If you have nothing to write, write and say so” Marcus Tullius Cicero

 

10.                        What was one of the most surprising things you learned your creative process with your books, editing, publishing or illustrating?

a.     I learned that creativity, talent in other words, is a critical but not exclusive element to writing. A willingness to be hyper-critical, seek others to offer different perspectives, and work at writing is the most effective way to getting published. Writing is hard work yet well worth it.

 

11.                        How many books have you written? 

a.     Three novels, one short story

 

 

12.                        Do you have any tricks or tips to help others become a better writer (please be as specific and information as you possibly can)? 
 

a.     There are no tricks, writing is hard work. The US Marine Corps has a recruiting poster that says, we’re not looking for applications we’re looking for commitments.

Commit to writing every day. Look for ideas everywhere.

 

 

13.                        Do you have any suggestions for providing twists in a good story?

a.      I use the “what-if” method. When I get an idea I ask what if? Use your imagination to introduce ideas about unexpected story lines.

 

14.                        What makes your or any book stand out from the crowd?

a.     I think my background helps. I work at my writing. I keep in mind that I am asking someone to take time from their lives to read my story. Of course, I am also asking them to pay for that opportunity. I want them to finish my books and say they felt strongly enough about the writing and story to finish it. Whenever someone asks me about a character in my book and they use the character’s name as if they are a real person that tells me I’ve accomplished my purpose.

 

 

15.                        What are some ways in which you promote your work?

a.     Well, the most obvious answer is responding to these opportunities to be interviewed. I also actively seek speaking engagements to discuss the issues in my book. I use social media to reach as wide an audience as possible. I also write two blogs www.joebroadmeadowblog.wordpress.com which is my personal blog and I co-write a blog called www.thehereticandtheholyman.wordpress.com with a friend of mine from high school.

 

 

 

16.                         What is the one thing you would do differently now (concerning writing or editing or publishing or illustrating) and why?

a.     The one thing I would do differently is take more time to edit before I published my first book. While the book has gotten good reviews, with the benefit of hindsight and more experience I realize it could have, should have, been better edited before publishing. 

 

 

17.                        What would you like carved onto your tombstone?  Or what saying or mantra do you live by?

a.     I embrace a simple philosophy, enjoy life today time is promised to no one

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