Essentials for Writing a Story

posted Sep 25, 2015, 10:28 AM by David Alan Binder   [ updated May 16, 2016, 7:00 AM ]

 
Essentials for Writing a Story
 
Yes, there are better ways than saying a story must have a beginning, middle and end and Brian Klems does it extremely well.
On the Writers Dig by Brian Klems, his The 5 Essential Story Ingredients, it states:
“Aristotle noted in his book Poetics that while a story does have a beginning, a middle and an ending, the beginning is not simply the first event in a series of three, but rather the emotionally engaging originating event. The middle is the natural and causally related consequence, and the end is the inevitable conclusive event.”
“In other words, stories have an origination, an escalation of conflict, and a resolution.”
Read the whole article, it is highly recommended and it says it far better than I can. 
 
I pass on what I learn to you, Dear Writers, as you will pass on what you are learning as you weave it into your articles, stories, novels, books, etc.
 
From the article above by Brian Klems, I then read a synopsis of Aristotle’s Poetics, that in and of itself is good reading, a tad dry, but holds up extremely well for its’ age and I recommend the cliff notes version on Spark Notes: http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/aristotle/section11.rhtml
 
The best kinds of surprises are brought about by peripeteia, or reversal of fortune, and anagnorisis, or discovery. A good plot progresses like a knot that is tied up with increasingly greater complexity until the moment of peripeteia at which point the knot is gradually untied until it reaches a completely unknotted conclusion.
 
I love the use of Latin and how interpretation can literally change the meaning (if you have ever studied deeply ancient texts like the Bible then you understand how that works).

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<title>David Alan Binder – Write Coach, Essentials for Writing a Story, a synopsis of Aristotle’s Poetics, use of Latin and how interpretation can literally change the meaning, 
Essentials for Writing a Story
 
Yes, there are better ways than saying a story must have a beginning, middle and end and Brian Klems does it extremely well.
On the Writers Dig by Brian Klems, his The 5 Essential Story Ingredients, it states:
“Aristotle noted in his book Poetics that while a story does have a beginning, a middle and an ending, the beginning is not simply the first event in a series of three, but rather the emotionally engaging originating event. The middle is the natural and causally related consequence, and the end is the inevitable conclusive event.”
“In other words, stories have an origination, an escalation of conflict, and a resolution.”
Read the whole article, it is highly recommended and it says it far better than I can.  </title>
 
<meta name="description=" content="David Alan Binder (aka dalanbinder) provides a blog for Writers, Essentials for Writing a Story, a synopsis of Aristotle’s Poetics , use of Latin and how interpretation can literally change the meaning, From the article above by Brian Klems, I then read a synopsis of Aristotle’s Poetics, that in and of itself is good reading, a tad dry, but holds up extremely well for its’ age and I recommend the cliff notes version on Spark Notes: http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/aristotle/section11.rhtml
 
The best kinds of surprises are brought about by peripeteia, or reversal of fortune, and anagnorisis, or discovery. A good plot progresses like a knot that is tied up with increasingly greater complexity until the moment of peripeteia at which point the knot is gradually untied until it reaches a completely unknotted conclusion.
 
I love the use of Latin and how interpretation can literally change the meaning (if you have ever studied deeply ancient texts like the Bible then you understand how that works). ">
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