Genesis Index & PDF

THIS WORK WAS COMPLETED BASED OFF A COPY OF SCRIPTURES published by Park Hill By Edwin Archer in 1856
Park Hill: Mission Press: Edwin Archer, Printer, 1856. PUBLIC DOMAIN
 
ᎼᏏ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᎤᏬᏪᎳᏅᎯ /mosi igvyiyi uwowelanvhi /First Book of Moses
 
ᏗᏓᎴᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᏚᏬᏢᏁ ᎦᎸᎶᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎶᎯ / didalenisgvi unelanvhi duwotlvne galvloi ale elohi
⁠ᎠᏯᏙᎸᎢ  / A⁠ya⁠do⁠lv⁠i⁠ ⁠/ Chapter


Read Genesis 1 in CHEROKEE Genesis 1

Genesis Hebrew Interlinear Bible Hebrew Genesis
                  
 
LINKS:
 
~Old Testament Project‎ > ‎Genesis Resources‎ > ‎Genesis 1 plus Index & PDF‎ > ‎Genesis 2‎ > ‎Genesis 3‎ > ‎Genesis 4‎ > ‎Genesis 5‎ > ‎Genesis 6‎ > ‎Genesis 7‎ > ‎Genesis 8‎ > ‎Genesis 9‎ > ‎Genesis 10‎ > ‎Genesis 11‎ > ‎Genesis 12‎ > ‎Genesis 13‎ > ‎Genesis 14‎ > ‎Genesis 15‎ > ‎Genesis 16‎ > ‎Genesis 17‎ > ‎Genesis 18‎ > ‎Genesis 19‎ > ‎Genesis 20‎ > ‎Genesis 21‎ > ‎Genesis 22‎ > ‎Genesis 23‎ > ‎Genesis 24‎ > ‎Genesis 25‎ > ‎Genesis 26‎ > ‎Genesis 27‎ > ‎Genesis 28‎ > ‎Genesis 29‎ > ‎Genesis 30‎ > ‎Genesis 31‎ > ‎Genesis 32‎ > ‎Genesis 33‎ > ‎Genesis 34‎ > ‎Genesis 35‎ > ‎Genesis 36‎ > ‎Genesis 37‎ > ‎Genesis 38‎ > ‎Genesis 39‎ > ‎Genesis 40‎ > ‎Genesis 41‎ > ‎Genesis 42‎ > ‎Genesis 43‎ > ‎Genesis 44‎ > ‎Genesis 45‎ > ‎Genesis 46‎ > ‎Genesis 47‎ > ‎Genesis 48‎ > ‎Genesis 49‎ > ‎ Genesis 50 last chapter
 
 
Noteworthy

 
-- Cherokee uses "ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎯ" "Unelanvhi"- which means CREATOR-- see Real Meaning of Unelanvhi
 
I often get asked:
 
What is ᏦᏩᏃ (Tsowano)?  Isn't Joseph just ᏦᏩ?
Many times you will see an "honorific" attached to a name in Cherokee writings.  This honorific, the addition of a suffix "-Ꮓ" ["-no"] is important and you will hear it in stories.
It does not just get attached to nouns either. Sometimes, you will see it on other parts of speech.
[example:  verse 3 ᏅᎦᏍᎪᎯᏃ nv⁠ga⁠s⁠go⁠hi⁠no and verse 4 ᎿᏉᏃ hnaquono -- see how many others you can spot!]
You should know:  although honorifics are not part of the basic grammar of the Cherokee language, they are a fundamental part of the sociolinguistics of Cherokee, and proper use is essential to proficient and appropriate speech. Significantly, referring to oneself using an honorific, or dropping an honorific when it is required, is a serious faux pas, in either case coming across as clumsy or arrogant.
 

Subpages (2): Genesis 1 Genesis 2
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