Bernard Nadal Baker (born 1854)

Wikipedia 🌐 Bernard N. Baker

[intro - todo]

🌳 See the Baker Family Tree PDF ( https://drive.google.com/open?id=1XYaC1qjBdSKllY0ZbueavfHSRGnfpOY2 )

1854 (May) - Birth

Bernard Nadal Baker WAS BORN 11 May 1854.

Page 2437 in the Dec 28 1918 issue of "The Commercial and Financial Chronicle"

Bernard N. Baker of Baltimore, a retired capitalist shipping expert and formerly a member of the U.S. Board, died at Santa Barbara, Cal., on Dec 20. Mr. Baker, who had helped in the drafting of the Ship Purchase Act, was appointed a member of the Shipping in Dec 1916, but he resigned the following month, his withdrawal having occurred as a result of a suggestion by Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo that Mr . Baker consider letting the Chairmanship (upon which Mr. Baker had evidently counted), go to the Pacific Coast, then represented by William Denman on the Board. Mr. Baker was one of the four recognized transportation experts selected by Secretary McAdoo for the National Sub-Committee on Transportation Problems. Before his appointment to the Shipping Board Mr. Baker acted as an expert adviser to the Administration in connection with its effort to have the Government own and operate a line of merchant steamships. Mr. Baker was President of the Atlantic & Pacific Transport Co., formerly President of the Baltimore Trust & Guarantee Co., and a director in many commercial enterprises. He was a member of the Moral Education Board and actively interested in moral education. Mr. Baker at the time of his death was 64 years of age. He had gone to Santa Barbara on the advice of his physician and his death occurred after an illness of three days.


See History of Baltimore : 1898-history-of-baltimore-maryland-from-1729-to-1898.pdf / https://drive.google.com/open?id=1T9ayVnkEy4QpRGCByJ7eYXej0vv0P7WK )

1876 - Partneship with James Stone Whiteley in 1876, Starting business Baker & Whiteley

Bernard Nadal Baker Formed a partnership with James Stone Whiteley in 1876, Starting business Baker & Whiteley, for conducting the coal business in Baltimore [aa1][ GDrive ].

1881 - Established Atlantic Transport Line (A.T.L.)

In 1881, with the support of the Pennsylvania Railroad (which wanted a transatlantic outlet for its freight business) Baker established the Atlantic Transport Line (A.T.L.). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_N._Baker .

1887 - Baker-Whiteley Coal Company

In 1887 Mr. Whiteley with Mr. Baker incorporated the Baker-Whiteley Coal Company [aa1][ GDrive ].

Subsequently they purchased the Rohr Scow Company, and incorporated that under the name of the Baltimore Storage and Lighterage Company, for the purpose of conducting a foreign steamship business. At the same time they organized the Atlantic Transport Line, and acquired the ownership of steamships engaged in business between New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and London, which [as of 1898] was composed of a fleet of fifteen steamers.

JAMES STONE WHITELEY, offices Rialto Building, Water street, Baltimore.—This gentleman was born in Baltimore, November 16, 1855. He is the son of Calvin Whiteley and Harriet H. (Stone) Whiteley. His parents were born in Maryland, and were of English descent. His father was for many years interested in and a member of the firm of Whiteley, Brother & Co., dry goods jobbers of this city; one of the leading houses of this line in Baltimore at the time. His mother died in 1872; his father is still living, being a resident of Baltimore, and having retired from active business some years since.

Mr. James S. Whiteley had two brothers, one of whom is now living, viz., Calvin Whiteley, Jr., civil engineer. Mr. James S. Whiteley was educated at Stewart Hall, of which Messrs. Grape and Hartman were the principals. He also for a short time at tended the school of Mr. George Carey. He entered active service as entry clerk in the employ of Messrs. Whiteley, Brother & Co. when seventeen years of age. After serving in this capacity for a short time, he was promoted to stock clerk and then put on the road as a drummer, meeting with considerable success in this latter occupation. In 1876 Mr. Whiteley left the employ of the firm of Messrs. Whiteley, Brother & Co., and started in business for himself—-he and Mr. Bernard N. Baker forming a partner ship under the name of Baker & Whiteley, for conducting the coal business in Baltimore. They were the pioneers of the Pennsylvania coal trade at Baltimore, and gradually worked up a large business at this Port, introducing Pennsylvania ooals in successful competition with those supplied from the George’s Creek region.

In 1887 Mr. Whiteley with Mr. Baker incorporated the Baker-Whiteley Coal Company. Subsequently they purchased the Rohr Scow Company, and incorporated that under the name of the Baltimore Storage and Lighterage Company, for the purpose of conducting a foreign steamship business. At the same time they organized the Atlantic Transport Line, and acquired the ownership of steamships engaged in business between New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and London, which is now composed of a fleet of fifteen steamers.


Mr. Whiteley is the vice-president and general manager of the Baker-Whiteley Coal Company and also vice-president of the Baltimore Storage and Lighterage Company.

The above companies employ over two thousand people in their ofiices in America and England, and transport between two and three million tons of merchandise and coal each year.

1901

The 🌐 Atlantic Transport Line was was folded into the 🌐 International Mercantile Marine shipping trust (IMM).

INGLESIDE

Barnard Nadal Baker had his fulltime residence, known as Ingleside (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingleside_(Catonsville,_Maryland) ) .

"In 1877 Baker married Elizabeth Elton Livzey. In 1889 Baker incorporated the 🌐 Atlantic Transport Line in London, and chose to start construction of the Ingleside Mansion.

The mansion was built on 300 acres (120 ha) of property that Baker inherited and an adjoining parcel he purchased. The building was based on an English home, with 49 rooms. The outside was clad in fieldstone. The roof was red tile. Fireplace mantles were hand carved. Several tenant houses and a formal garden were built on the property.[2] A world traveler, Baker described Ingleside as his only true home."

In April 1918, the Bakers turned the mansion over to Company C of the food production committee of the women's section of the Maryland defense council to support the war efforts. Women farmers would tend crops for $1.20 a day, compared to the going rate of $2.00 a day for male labor. There was some resistance in the community to using women laborers. Governor Emerson Harrington gave a speech at the mansion porch in support of the efforts in July 1918. Troops were also able to live at the house and commute to war-effort jobs. Most of Baker's ships were lost in the war. He died later that year in California.

Ingleside burned down in 1953.

Nearby Ingleside Avenue is named for the mansion. Baker Avenue is named after its original builder, Benard M. Baker.


REFERENCES

[aa1] 1898-history-of-baltimore-maryland-from-1729-to-1898.pdf / https://drive.google.com/open?id=1T9ayVnkEy4QpRGCByJ7eYXej0vv0P7WK