Welcome‎ > ‎

News


Two new chapters added to Mycologia Scotica

posted 21 Dec 2016, 15:14 by Dave Genney   [ updated 21 Dec 2016, 15:17 ]

We are pleased to announce an early Christmas present from Prof. Roy Watling; two new chapters of Mycologia Scotica! 


If you haven't come across Mycologia Scotica before it is a compilation of all the specimen-holdings in the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh up to 1999 when Roy retired. Information on distribution by watershed, habitat and other important notes are provided for each species. More information here.


The new chapters cover ascomycete fungi with Chapter 24 covering the Order Pezizales (e.g. morels and cup fungi) and Chapter 25 the Orders Helotiales and Taphrinales (e.g. alder tongue and bog beacon).


We have added the new Orders, Families and Genera to the Mycologia Scotica chapter index on the Scottish Fungi website, so hopefully you'll find it easy enough to find any species you are looking for.


A huge thanks to Roy for yet another enormous contribution to Scottish mycology!

Suillus profiles now available - an easy group of fungi for beginners!

posted 17 Oct 2016, 02:25 by Scottish Fungi   [ updated 17 Oct 2016, 02:25 ]

Suillus luteus
We have added a new series of profiles for Suillus fungi to our Fungus of the Month archive. This is a group of large fungi with pores instead of gills under their caps. The group as a whole can easily be identified and contains relatively distinct species, so an ideal group to start on if you are a beginner. We have rolled all of the profiles into a handy PDF for you to take out into the woods with you. Enjoy, and please remember to let us know what you find.

Fungus of the Month: False Saffron Milkcap

posted 9 Sep 2016, 05:15 by Scottish Fungi

False Saffron Milkcap
 (Lactarius deterrimus) is a fairly common fungus in Britain, which due to its bright carrot orange colour and tinges of green is easily seen on the forest floor. Lactarius mushrooms are characteristic for the excretion of a milky fluid when damaged which led to the common name ‘milk-caps’. You can read more in this month's fungus profile.

Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

Jack Marriott's Fungus Site Quality Index may help mycologists identify important areas for fungi

posted 3 Sep 2016, 12:37 by Scottish Fungi

J. V. R. Marriott
In the late 90s the BMS joined the Forestry Commission in a biodiversity project to which many members of the Society contributed records. One of the spin-off studies of this project was a manuscript prepared by the late Jack Marriott. Unfortunately this never saw the light of day but we feel that it is worth publishing. It helps mycologists assess the importance of their favourite collecting patches to find out which justify more active attention, for example as candidate 
Important Fungus Areas. For others it allows a site to be assessed for its fungi against a reproducible background scale. In this way a site can be recommended for its mycodiversity or rejected when limited resources are available for fungus conservation and funding needs to be concentrated on other areas. Find out more about the Fungus Site Quality Index.

'The Deceiver' - a common but variable Fungus of the Month

posted 7 Jul 2016, 04:04 by Scottish Fungi   [ updated 7 Jul 2016, 04:07 ]

This month's Fungus of the Month, Laccaria laccata, is very variable, hence its English name. Read the Full profile for tips on how to identify it. There are a few similar species in the genus, so it's an opportunity to get to grips with some simple microscope work - or ask someone to check for you!
 
Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

A fungus that can pop up in your house - the Carpet Cup fungus

posted 31 Jan 2016, 13:38 by Scottish Fungi   [ updated 1 Feb 2016, 01:09 by Dave Genney ]

This month's Fungus of the Month can pop up in some very unexpected places - including carpets and walls in your home!
 Read all about in the full profile for Peziza domiciliana (carpet cup).

Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

Fungi and Wild Food Forage event near Dingwall

posted 25 Aug 2015, 01:26 by Dave Genney   [ updated 25 Aug 2015, 01:34 by Scottish Fungi ]

Join Scotland's only full-time foraging tutor and confessed 'fungi obsessive' Mark Williams of Galloway Wild Foods for an amazing journey into the sometimes deadly, often delicious, and always fascinating world of fungi.

The walk will cover around 1-2 miles of easy walking through one of the few surviving areas of semi-natural woodland on the Black Isle. The diverse trees and habitats provide a good chance of learning about a wide range of edible, poisonous and useful fungi.  You will also explore edible and useful early autumn plants.  There will be an al fresco cook-in and chance to taste your finds afterwards. 

LEARN

Find and identify important fungi species & edible plants; learn how to spot dangerous mushrooms and plant families and species; the remarkable and important jobs that fungi perform in nature; medicinal, craft and bushcraft uses of fungi; how to harvest, clean, prepare and preserve mushrooms

EXPECT

Gentle walking, over about 2.5 hours, sometimes muddy, with occasional options for the adventurous to delve into the undergrowth.  Wild tasters and treats throughout the walk. A wild cook-in in the woods afterwards and a chance to taste some of the wild food you have encountered.  (This is not a full meal).

Please come prepared for an afternoon in the woods and bring stout footwear, waterproofs, warm clothes, drinks and snacks. You might also like to bring a camera, notebook, penknife and a cloth bag or basket.

Suitable for children over the age of 10.  Places are limited to 20.  BOOKING ESSENTIAL

Fungus of the month - Chicken-of-the-Woods

posted 28 May 2015, 07:00 by Scottish Fungi

This month's fungus of the month is the beautiful large yellow bracket fungus, Laetiporus sulphureus. It can occur any time from late May onwards.  Enjoyed as an edible fungus by many but it is advisable to be cautious the first time it is eaten because it makes about 20% of people ill! Read all about in the full profile.

Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

Fungus of the Month: Shaggy Inkcap (Coprinus comatus)

posted 22 Apr 2015, 14:41 by Scottish Fungi

This month's Scottish Fungus of the Month is the Shaggy Inkcap. It is edible and apparently good for you when young, but soon turns into a black inky mess as the mushrooms age.  Shaggy Inkcaps should be starting to produce mushrooms any time now.  Have a look at the full profile page here so you know exactly what to look out for.

If you look at the distribution map on the profile page you will see it is surprisingly absent from much of Scotland.  Are these gaps real or is it just under recorded? Perhaps you can help find out?  Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

Fungus of the Month: Black Witches Butter (Exidia glandulosa)

posted 23 Mar 2015, 14:08 by Scottish Fungi   [ updated 23 Mar 2015, 14:09 ]

Exidia nigricans - Liz Holden
Have you ever been walking through a deciduous forest and wondered what those black, tar-like looking structures are that grow on fallen trunks and branches? Well, 
Exidia glandulosa also known as Black Witches Butter would be a good guess. This fungus is more often recognised during wetter months as it dehydrates during dry weather and shrinks to a dry, shiny and only millimetre thin membrane on the substrate surface. However, the fungus quickly recovers to a soft gelatinous blob in rainy weather. Find out more about this fungus and its look-a-like E. nigricans in the March Fungus of the Month profile.

Please let us know if you find it or submit the record to your local fungus group. Also, remember that the ever growing list of 'Fungus of the Month' profiles is available here, ordered alphabetically or by its highlight month.

1-10 of 84