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Iball 3

Iball3 remembers of a traditional electronical puzzle from the eighties.
It has the shape of a small blue transparent ball.
On the ball are six buttons and a one-digit LED display.


A button will flash as soon as it is pressed in one of the possible colours red, blue or green.
If it is pressed another time, then it will flash in a different colour.
The following rule applies:
If a button is pushed and the colour is identical to the colour before,
then the lights will stay switched on, otherwise all lights will switch off.

The task is to press the buttons in the right order in a short time intervall (90 sec)
so that all six buttons have the same colour.

The puzzle has two levels. In the first level, there are only three colours (red, blue, green),
whereas in the second level there is additionally purple as colour.

The game is completely different compared to other electronical gadget games.
Traditional electronic gadget games are similiar to Simon or Lights out.
Simon's challenge is to repeat a given sequence which keeps on getting longer.
Lights out has lights which switch on or of if a button is pressed.
The rules which controll the lights are known.
Iball3 is different, as the colour which will flash is unknown.
I try empirically by try and error to get an overview.


I will explain this principle with two examples:
If I press two buttons, let's say A and B,
so the buttons will always flash in different colours.
Is there a certain pattern? Does the frequence repeat itself or does it happen by chance?

I press A and B 12 times in succession:

AB
redblue
greenred
bluegreen
redblue
greenred
bluegreen
redblue
greenred
bluegreen
redblue
greenred
bluegreen

You can see that the sequence repeats itself after three moves.

Does the order of pressing the buttons matter?
Does the colour combination differ, if A is pressed first
and then B or if B is pressed first and A second?

I press A -> B three times in a row:

AB
redblue
greenred
bluegreen

I press B -> A three times in a row:

BA
bluered
redgreen
greenblue

=> The order does not matter.

Although this puzzle looks simple, it is a mental challenge and has an addictive character,
so that you don't like to put it away. It is therefore ideal for people
who like to crack a code such as scientists and computer freaks.
Nevertheless, other people will also enjoy its easy handling and fun factor.

You can buy the Iball3 on the website.