Designing the Ultimate Dive Boat Part Two

Here is the rough design sketch. It is "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea", "Sea Hunt" and "Johnny Quest" all wrapped up in one super cool vessel.(for those non-boomers, these are shows from the sixties. Great stuff!)

 

 

I tapped into the little kid in me who drew adventures, inventing all kinds of futuristic vehicles, and came up with this boat. I kinda went wild and added some of my own gadgets. For example, a helium filled aerial reconnaissance balloon with retractable tether equipped with cameras to spot whales at a distance, a custom submersible with its own enclosed deck and articulated dive platform, and of course it needed it own helicopter. I read Popular Science Magazine when I was growing up and enjoyed all the futuristic illustrations they would show of designs including cut away views that revealed the inner workings. I decided to do that with my boat as well. It was fun making things up.

Rough cut away Sketch

 This was an alternate view to give me a feel for the area needed for the Helicopter landing deck

I traded off this job for Re-breather training which involves diving with gear that re-circulates your exhaled air. It removes some of the CO2 so you can re-breathe the same air again. Without getting too technical, you are able to dive without exhaling bubbles, which make a lot of  noise underwater. Jacques Cousteau was one of the first to use this technology so his research team could get close to underwater creatures without scaring them off. It is great for photographers because you become a sea creature yourself and are less noticed... sometimes. It is also quite humbling because bigger creatures now look at you with that "what's for lunch" stare instead of swimming away. Fortunately, the only problem I had was with a trigger fish who thought the reflection in my dive mask was another trigger fish and kept on bouncing off the glass. I think I was in the middle of some strange mating ritual.

These are some technical diving illustrations that were used in a diving manual

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