18.5 – 18.6 HF Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 32.


                                                                       High Frequency HF Radio (3 of 4).  
                                                                                         26 October 2009.


HF Experimental Radio.   

Digital transmission. 


The All Frequency Database Index is here: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos10

 

You are here:

18.5 HF Digital modes of transmission.

18.6 HF Experimental Radio.

 

 

18.5

Digital modes of transmission.

HF Digital modes of transmission.

On-line forum about decoding digital short wave signals.

http://forums.radioreference.com/digital-signals-decoding

 

 

18.6

Experimental Radio.

HF Experimental Radio.

HF (Hif) Experimental Radio (er).

Hifer.

HiFER.

High Frequency low power experimental radio.

Includes legal no-license-needed Experimental Radio Transmitters.

The hobby of listening to high frequency low power (micro) radio beacons.

The hobby of listening to experimental high frequency radio beacons in various bands including the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) bands of:

  6.765 MHz 6.795 MHz band with a centre frequency of 6.780 MHz in the 44 metre band (44 meter band),

13.553 MHz 13.567 MHz with a centre frequency of 13.560 MHz in the 22 metre band (22 meter band),

26.957 MHz – 27.283 MHz with a centre frequency of 27.120 MHz in the 11 metre band (11 meter band).

Introduction to the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) bands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISM_band

High Frequency radio listeners can use free to download computer software to see on their computer very low power radio signals over large distances as well as radio signals under the noise.

Introduction to MedFER (Medium Frequency experimental radio).

http://www.hfunderground.com/wiki/HiFER

BUILD A HIGH FREQUENCY TEST TRANSMITTER WITHOUT SOLDERING.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/proto/LFproto.htm#HiFER

With QRSS (computer controller very slow Morse code) you can overcome high noise and interference and dig signals out of the noise.

Free software for your computer to receive LowFER radio beacon signals.

Free software for your computer to transmit QRSS LowFER radio beacon signals.

Free software to make your computer into a soundcard based digital oscilloscope.

Free software to crop and convert JPEG files to the Slow Scan Television SSTV (Picture transmission and reception on radio) Martin M1 standard (320x240 pixels).

Free software from Rik (amateur radio call sign ON7YD) in Belgium.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/software.htm

You can see the Morse code dots and the dashes on your computer screen when QRSS software is used. This makes it easy to decode the different call signs used to identify each beacon.

http://www.h-wolff.de/Hifer%20Gallery.htm

 

Australia.

HF Experimental Radio in Australia.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in Australia.

Hifer in Australia.

HiFER in Australia.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Australia on the following HF bands (see conditions below).

Hifer HF bands in megahertz.

  3.025 MHz – 3.155 MHz,

  3.500 MHz – 3.700 MHz,

  3.700 MHz – 3.950 MHz,

  4.438 MHz – 4.650 MHz,

13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz,

24.000 MHz – 24.890 MHz,

26.957 MHz – 27.283 MHz,

29.700 MHz – 29.720 MHz.

Hifer HF bands in kilohertz.

  3025 kHz – 3155 kHz,

  3500 kHz – 3700 kHz,

  3700 kHz – 3950 kHz,

  4438 kHz – 4650 kHz,

13553 kHz – 13567 kHz,

24000 kHz – 24890 kHz,

26957 kHz – 27283 kHz,

29700 kHz – 29720 kHz.

Hifer HF bands in Hertz.

  3025000 Hz – 3155000 Hz,

  3500000 Hz – 3700000 Hz,

  3700000 Hz – 3950000 Hz,

  4438000 Hz – 4650000 Hz,

13553000 Hz – 13567000 Hz,

24000000 Hz – 24890000 Hz,

26957000 Hz – 27283000 Hz,

29700000 Hz – 29720000 Hz.

HF Bands where no radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Australia (see conditions below).

  3025 kHz – 3155 kHz 95 metre band (95 meter band),

  3500 kHz – 3700 kHz 80 metre band (80 meter band),

  3700 kHz – 3950 kHz 75 metre band (75 meter band),

  4438 kHz – 4650 kHz 65 metre band (65 meter band),

13553 kHz – 13567 kHz 22 metre band (22 meter band),

24000 kHz – 24890 kHz 12 metre band (22 meter band),

26957 kHz – 27283 kHz 11 metre band (11 meter band),

29700 kHz – 29720 kHz 10 metre band (10 meter band) “29er” 29.7 MHz Experimental Radio band.

In the HF bands where no transmitter licence (license) is needed the maximum antenna radiated power is shown for each band:

95 m band 3.025 MHz – 3.155 MHz using 7.5 nW eirp (0.001 µW eirp). 

80 m band 3.500 MHz – 3.700 MHz using 30 pW eirp (0.03 nW eirp).

75 m band 3.700 MHz – 3.950 MHz using 7.5 nW eirp (0.001 µW eirp).

65 m band 4.438 MHz – 4.650 MHz using 7.5 nW eirp (0.001 µW eirp).

22 m band 13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz using 100 mW eirp. 

12 m band 24.000 MHz – 24.890 MHz using 10 mW eirp. 

11 m band 26.957 MHz – 27.283 MHz using 1 Watt eirp.

“29er” 10 m band 29.700 MHz – 29.720 MHz using 100 mW eirp. 

Very low power ISM radio beacons in Australia.

The hobby of listening to very low power radio signals.

The Australian Radio communications (Low Interference Potential Devices LIPD class license 2000) with all amendments came into effect on 1 July 2009.

LIPD allow transmitters that meet certain power levels to be used without the need to apply for a license.

LIPD, (section 3, Note) states that LIPD devises must not cause radio frequency interference to other Radio communication devises.

The responsibility is on LIPD owners to resolve interference for example by retuning or stopping their operation.

LIPD, Section 3A, page 4, Definitions says: “This maximum EIRP means the largest amount of equivalent isotropically radiated power that is radiated in any direction from either an antenna that is an integral part of the transmitter or an antenna that is connected to the transmitter.”

Schedule 1, Transmitters, page 7 shows the frequencies listed above as not requiring an application for a license (all people in Australia have been granted a “class license” and do not need to request a licence, license).

Click to download the Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA (Low Interference Potential Devices LIPD) pdf - LIPD

Page 19 and 38: In Sydney, Australia VK2ZTO tested a radio beacon on 13.555450 MHz in the 22 metre license-free ISM band with a power of 3 milliwatts (3 mW) to a quarter wave vertical antenna using the Wanjina (FDK emission) and was heard in the USA by K0LR.

The 22 metre band experimental radio beacons. Note that the New Zealand information has changed and is updated in New Zealand HiFER.

http://www.djirra.com/vk2zto_legacy/docs/vk2zto_legacy.pdf

VK6DI West Australian amateur radio station results using very low power.

http://www.users.on.net/~davroz/vk6di

Australian National University ANU research using the 27 MHz band.

http://engnet.anu.edu.au/DEpeople/Gerard.Borg/pubs/project_ENGN4545.pdf

 

Canada.

HF Experimental Radio in Canada.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in Canada.

Hifer in Canada.

HiFER in Canada.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Canada on the following HF bands (see conditions below).

Hifer HF bands in megahertz.

  6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz,

13.110 MHz 13.410 MHz,

13.410 MHz 13.553 MHz, 

13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz the most popular HiFER in the 13 MHz band,

13.567 MHz 13.710 MHz,

13.710 MHz 14.010 MHz,

13.110 MHz 14.010 MHz,

26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz.

Hifer HF bands in kilohertz.

  6765 kHz – 6795 kHz,

13110 kHz 13410 kHz,

13410 kHz 13553 kHz, 

13553 kHz – 13567 kHz the most popular HiFER in the 13 MHz band,

13567 kHz 13710 kHz,

13710 kHz 14010 kHz,

13110 kHz 14010 kHz,

26960 kHz – 27280 kHz.

Hifer HF bands in Hertz.

  6765000 Hz – 6795000 Hz,

13110000 Hz 13410000 Hz,

13410000 Hz 13553000 Hz, 

13553000 Hz – 13567000 Hz the most popular HiFER in the 13 MHz band,

13567000 Hz 13710000 Hz,

13710000 Hz 14010000 Hz,

13110000 Hz 14010000 Hz,

26960000 Hz – 27280000 Hz.

HF Bands where no radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Canada (see conditions below).

  6765 kHz – 6795 kHz 44 metre band (44 meter band),

13110 kHz – 13410 kHz 23 metre band (23 meter band),

13410 kHz – 13553 kHz 22.5 metre band (22.5 meter band),

13553 kHz – 13567 kHz 22 metre band (22 meter band) - 22 m is the most popular,

13567 kHz – 13710 kHz 21 metre band (21 meter band),

13710 kHz – 14010 kHz 20 metre band (20 meter band),

13110 kHz – 14010 kHz 23 metre - 20 metre band (23 meter – 20 meter band),

26960 kHz – 27280 kHz 11 metre band (11 meter band).

In the HF bands where no transmitter licence (license) is needed the maximum antenna radiation field strength measured 30 metres from the antenna is not to be more than:

44 m band 6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz field strength maximum of 15.5 millivolts per metre.

23 m band 13.110 MHz - 13.410 MHz field strength maximum of 106 microvolts per metre.

22.5 m band 13.410 MHz - 13.553 MHz field strength maximum of 334 microvolts per metre.

22 m band 13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz field strength maximum of 15.848 millivolts per metre (most popular of the 13 MHz bands because the transmitter power is equivalent to about 4.8 mW to a dipole antenna or ground plane antenna).

21 m band 13.567 MHz - 13.710 MHz field strength maximum of 334 microvolts per metre.

20 m band 13.710 MHz - 14.010 MHz field strength maximum of 106 microvolts per metre.

23 m – 20 m band 13.110 MHz -14.010 MHz field strength maximum of 30 microvolts per metre.

11 m band 26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz using an antenna radiated power of 0.03 mW e.i.r.p.

Very low power ISM radio beacons in Canada.

High Frequency (HF) Radio Beacons have been established by individual hobby radio enthusiasts in their home to see how far such radio waves can travel.

In 2009 hobby radio listeners can use computer aided software to extend the range at which it is possible for a radio receiver to detect these low power radio beacons.

Industry Canada 30 July 2009 radio regulations RSS-210 Low-power licence-exempt devices operating in non-service specific licence-exempt bands include transmissions in the Industrial, Scientific and Medical ISM bands of:

6.765 MHz –  6.795 MHz if the radio wave field strength of any emission is not more than 15.5 millivolts/m (84 dBµV/m) measured 30 metres away from the antenna (Annex 2, section A2.5, a) and

13.553 MHz –  13.567 MHz if the radio wave field strength of any emission is not more than 15.848 millivolts/m (84 dBµV/m) measured at 30 metres away from the antenna (Annex 2, section A2.6, a).

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08477.html

Low-power Licence-exempt Radio communication Devices.

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08655.html

Industry Canada Radio Standards Specification 310 (RSS310), Issue 2, Low-power licence-exempt radio communication devices (All Frequency Bands): Category II Equipment sets out standard requirements for low-power licence-exempt radio communication devices that are certification exempt (30 July 2009).

RSS310, Section 3.8 on the:

26960 kHz – 27280 kHz (26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz) band the field strength shall not exceed 10 millivolts per metre measured at 3 metres away from the antenna. This is equivalent to an antenna radiated power of 30 microwatts effective isotopic radiated power (30 µW e.i.r.p., 0.03 mW e.i.r.p.).

Any transmitter that has a power consumption (total input power into the device) not exceeding 6 nanowatts is excluded from any Industry Canada requirement, and may operate on any radio frequency including the restricted frequencies listed in Table 1.

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08448.html

Canadian radio transmitter experimenters that might be searching for equipment that has been approved and has a power level that is documented can search the Industry Canada data base of transmitters they have tested, approved and see the power out put or field strength they recorded online.

Enter Radio Specification (for no license required) RSS210

Enter lower frequency (in MHz) 13.553

Enter upper frequency (in MHz) 13.567

Press search.

If you see a device you like then put the manufactures name and equipment model number in Google to find more information.

Turning the devise on and off will allow you to setup a Morse code radio beacon transmitter. Put these details on the internet: Your frequency, how to identify your radio beacon and invite listeners to email their reception reports.

http://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sitt/reltel/srch/nwRdSrch.do?lang=eng

 

Netherlands.

HF Experimental Radio in the Netherlands.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in the Netherlands.

Hifer in the Netherlands.

HiFER in the Netherlands.

13.550 MHz – 13.570 MHz.

22 metre band, 22 meter band 13550 kHz – 13570 kHz.

HF Experimental Radio in Netherlands.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in Netherlands.

Circuit diagram of the 1.8 milliwatt radio beacon used on 13.555.440 Mhz. 

http://hifer-nl.8k.com

 

New Zealand.

HF Experimental Radio in New Zealand.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in New Zealand.

Hifer in New Zealand.

HiFER in New Zealand.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand on the following HF bands (see conditions below).

Hifer HF bands in megahertz.

  6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz,

13.550 MHz – 13.570 MHz,

26.950 MHz – 27.300 MHz,

29.700 MHz – 30.000 MHz.

Hifer HF bands in kilohertz.

  6765 kHz – 6795 kHz,

13550 kHz – 13570 kHz,

26950 kHz – 27300 kHz,

29700 kHz – 30000 kHz.

Hifer HF bands in Hertz.

  6765000 Hz – 6795000 Hz,

13550000 Hz – 13570000 Hz,

26950000 Hz – 27300000 Hz,

29700000 Hz – 30000000 Hz.

HF Bands where no radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand (see conditions below).

  6765 kHz – 6795 kHz 44 metre band (44 meter band),

13550 kHz – 13570 kHz 22 metre band (22 meter band),

26960 kHz – 27280 kHz 11 metre band (11 meter band),

29700 kHz – 30000 kHz 10 metre band (10 meter band) “29er” 29.7 MHz Experimental Radio band.

In the HF bands where no transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand the maximum antenna radiated power is not to be more than as shown in the following bands:

44 m 6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz antenna radiated power of 10 mW e.i.r.p.

22 m 13.550 MHz – 13.570 MHz antenna radiated power of 100 mW e.i.r.p.

11 m 26.950 MHz – 27.300 MHz antenna radiated power of 1 W e.i.r.p.

“29er” 10 m 29.700 MHz – 30.000 MHz antenna radiated power of 1 W e.i.r.p.

Very low power ISM radio beacons in New Zealand.

Ministry of Economic Development MED, New Zealand document Radiocommunications Regulations (General User Radio Licence for Short Range Devices, Notice 2007 (last updated 18 March 2008) states that a general user radio licence is granted for the transmission of radio waves for the purpose of Short Range Devices (SRD), also known as Restricted Radiation Devices (RRD), Low Interference Potential Devices (LIPD), or Spread Spectrum Devices (SSD).

This means that for certain frequencies and power levels no request for a license is needed. This includes the following

44 metre band 6765 kHz – 6795 kHz using 10 mW peak power e.i.r.p. for Telemetry or Telecommand.

22 metre band 13550 kHz – 13570 kHz using 100 mW peak power e.i.r.p. for Telemetry or Telecommand.

11 metre band 26950 kHz – 27300 kHz using 1 Watt peak power e.i.r.p. with no restriction.

10 metre band 29700 kHz – 30000 kHz using 100 mW peak power e.i.r.p. with no restriction.

If interference results a user must change frequency reduce power, or cease operation.

http://www.rsm.govt.nz/cms/licensing/types-of-licence/general-user-licences/short-range-devices/#note1

How to build high frequency radio beacon.

http://www.qsl.net/zl1bpu/MICRO/STANDARDS/Pre-Exciter.htm

 

Sweden.

Home made 5 milliwatt (5 mW) transmitter made on 14.10111 MHz by amateur radio operator SM6LKM in Sweden was heard in the UK and the USA. This is an example of Swedish radio amateurs using micro power radio beacons in the licensed 20 metre amateur radio band.

http://home.swipnet.se/~w-41522/hifer/hifer1.html

 

USA.

HF Experimental Radio in the USA.

HF Experimental Radio in the US.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in the USA.

High Frequency Experimental Radio in the US.

Hifer in the USA.

Hifer in the US.

HiFER in the USA.

HiFER in the US.

No radio transmitter license (licence) is needed in the USA on the following HF bands (see conditions below).

Hifer HF bands in megahertz.

  6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz,

13.110 MHz 13.410 MHz,

13.410 MHz 13.553 MHz 

13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz the most popular HiFER 13 MHz band,

13.567 MHz 13.710 MHz,

13.710 MHz 14.010 MHz,

13.110 MHz 14.010 MHz,

26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz.

Hifer HF bands in kilohertz.

  6765 MHz – 6795 MHz,

13110 MHz 13410 MHz,

13410 MHz 13553 MHz 

13553 MHz – 13567 MHz the most popular HiFER 13 MHz band,

13567 MHz 13710 MHz,

13710 MHz 14010 MHz,

13110 MHz 14010 MHz,

26960 MHz – 27280 MHz.

Hifer HF bands in Hertz.

  6765000 Hz – 6795000 Hz,

13110000 Hz 13410000 Hz,

13410000 Hz 13553000 Hz 

13553000 Hz – 13567000 Hz the most popular HiFER 13 MHz band,

13567000 Hz 13710000 Hz,

13710000 Hz 14010000 Hz,

13110000 Hz 14010000 Hz,

26960000 Hz – 27280000 Hz.

HF Bands where no radio transmitter license (licence) is needed in the USA (see conditions below).

  6765 kHz – 6795 kHz 44 metre band (44 meter band)

13110 kHz – 13410 kHz 23 metre band (23 meter band)

13410 kHz – 13553 kHz 22.5 metre band (22.5 meter band)

13553 kHz – 13567 kHz 22 metre band (22 meter band) - 22 m is the most popular Hifer 13 MHz band,

13567 kHz – 13710 kHz 21 metre band (21 meter band),

13710 kHz – 14010 kHz 20 metre band (20 meter band),

13110 kHz – 14010 kHz 23 metre - 20 metre band (23 meter – 20 meter band),

26960 kHz – 27280 kHz 11 metre band (11 meter band).

In the HF bands where no transmitter license (licence) is needed the maximum antenna radiation field strength measured 30 metres from the antenna is not to be more than:

44 m band 6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz field strength maximum of either 100 microvolts per meter or 15 microvolts per meter depending on the transmission bandwidth.

23 m band 13.110 MHz - 13.410 MHz field strength maximum of 106 microvolts per metre.

22.5 m band 13.410 MHz - 13.553 MHz field strength maximum of 334 microvolts per metre.

22 m band 13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz field strength maximum of 15.848 millivolts per metre (most popular of the 13 MHz bands because the transmitter power is equivalent to about 4.8 mW to a dipole antenna or ground plane antenna).

21 m band 13.567 MHz - 13.710 MHz field strength maximum of 334 microvolts per metre.

20 m band 13.710 MHz - 14.010 MHz field strength maximum of 106 microvolts per metre.

23 m – 20 m band 13.110 MHz -14.010 MHz field strength maximum of 30 microvolts per metre.

11 m band 26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz field strength maximum of 10,000 microvolts per meter measured 3 metres away from the antenna.

Very low power ISM radio beacons in the USA.

High Frequency (HF) Radio Beacons have been established by individual hobby radio enthusiasts in their home to see how far such radio waves can travel.

In 2009 hobby radio listeners can use computer aided software to extend the range at which it is possible for a radio receiver to detect these low power radio beacons.

FCC radio regulations part 15 rules, page 90, section 15.223 “Operation in the band 1.705 MHz – 10 MHz” includes not requiring a license for operation in the:

44 metre band, 44 meter band 6765 kHz – 6795 kHz, (6.765 MHz – 6.795 MHz) when a maximum field strength measured 30 metres away from the antenna is either 100 microvolts per metre or 15 microvolts per metre depending on the transmission bandwidth.

FCC radio regulations part 15 rules, page 90, section 15.225 “Operation within the band 13.110 MHz – 14.010 MHz” for transmitters not requiring a license allows maximum power in the 13 MHz industrial, scientific and medical ISM band of:

13.553 MHz - 13.567 MHz if the radio wave field strength of any emission is not more than 15.848 millivolts/m measured at 30 meters away from the antenna. This maximum field strength limit works out to about 4.8 milliwatts (4.8 mW) into a dipole antenna or a quarter-wave vertical ground plane antenna.

FCC radio regulations part 15 rules, page 90, section 15.227 “Operation within the band 26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz” not requiring a license include:

26.960 MHz – 27.280 MHz transmissions where the field strength measured 3 meter away from the antenna does not exceed a field strength of 10,000 microvolts per meter.

The FCC Federal Communications Commission 10 July 2008 radio regulations, Part 15 rules for Radio Frequency devices outlines the USA radio regulations under which an intended radiator of radio waves may be operated without a license.

Unlicensed transmitters (intended radiators) must not cause interference to other radio or TV stations. Unlicensed radio stations (intended radiators) are not protected from interference.

Part 15 rules, page 13, section 15.23 allow home built transmitters (Intentional radiators).

Home-built Hifer transmitter radio regulations for Part 15 compliant devices.

Home built Hifer transmitters.

Home built SW radio transmitters.

Home constructed SW radio transmitters.

Home-made short wave radio transmitters.

Home made short wave radio transmitter.

Home-made short wave radio transmitter.

Home-made short wave transmitter.

Home built radio transmitters.

Home built radio transmitter.

Home constructed radio transmitters.

Home constructed radio transmitter.

Home made radio transmitters.

Home made radio transmitter.

The FCC Part 15 radio regulations for home-made radio transmitter devices.

FCC 10 July 2008 Part 15 radio regulations, page 13, section 15.23 “Home-built devices” states:

(a) Equipment authorization is not required for devices that are not marketed, are not constructed from a kit and are built in quantities of 5 or less for personal use.

(b) It is recognized that the individual builder of Home-built equipment may not possess the means to perform the measurements for determining compliance with the regulations. In this case the builder is expected to employ good engineering practices to meet specified technical standards to the greatest extent practicable.

Section 15.5 also applies to home made devices (transmitters).

Page 9, Section 15.5 “General conditions of operation”.

(a). No person has a right to the continued use of current frequencies (this means that any frequency might be re-allocated for a different use in future).

(b). No harmful radio or TV interference is to be caused and interference from licensed or unlicensed stations must be accepted.

(c). Operation of the devise (transmitter) must cease if an FCC representative informs you of harmful interference caused by your devise. Operation can only restart once the cause of the interference has been corrected.

(d). Transmitters causing damped wave are prohibited (not allowed).

Part 15 rules, page 80 is the list of frequencies where intended radio emissions (transmissions) is not permitted. Only spurious emission (such as unavoidable low level harmonic radiation as a result of transmitting on another frequency) is allowed in those restricted bands.

The FCC part 15 radio regulations in the USA dated 10 July 2008.

http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/part15/PART15_07-10-08.pdf

SOME EXAMPLES OF HOME MADE TRANSMITTERS.

USA amateur radio operator Larry (call sign WB3ANQ) operates outside the amateur radio bands under the part 15 (no license necessary regulations).

Larry WB3ANQ has a 24 hour radio beacon on a short wave radio frequency of 13.555 MHz in the industrial, scientific and medical ISM 22 meter band.

Larry is using a power output of 100 microwatts (100 µW) to a dipole antenna.

This power is so low that it falls in the USA part 15 regulations (no license is necessary).

Larry WB3ANQ was heard by Peter (ham radio call sign PA1SDB) in Holland which is a distance of 3868 miles, 6227 kilometres, 6227 kilometers.

Free Computer software allows anyone to receive such small signals and a photo shows how the radio signal from the USA was seen on the computer screen in Holland.

WB3ANQ used a HP-3336B signal generator as the transmitter with the radio frequency power output set to -10 dBm (minus 10 dBm) which is 100 microwatts.

100 microwatts is 0.1 milliwatts (0.1 mW).

100 microwatts is 0.0001 Watt (0.0001 W).

The power of a toy walkie talkie is 35 milliwatts and the power of the USA radio beacon is 0.1 milliwatts. This is much lower than the toy walkie talkie yet listeners can download free computer software and see such weak signals half way across the world!

http://www.wb3anq.com/HiFER%20LP/peter.html

Home made transmitter radio beacon for 13.5555 KHz.

http://www.w4dex.com/HiFer.htm

On 7 August 2009 USA radio amateur KA9SZX used to internet to let the world know he has a 24 hour 7 day beacon on 13.563 MHz sending the call sign “SZX”.

http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/2009/08/new-hifer-beacon.html

Call sign “W V” (callsign WV) is from a 4 milliwatt home made radio beacon on 13.55567 MHz.

http://www.wa8ywo.com/HiFerbeacon.html 

 

How to make a radio station antenna in Somalia.

Ropes are attached to the antenna in Galkayo, North East Somalia.


In August 1994 ropes are attached from the top of the tower to the antenna of Radio Free Somalia (“Free for all to use”, later known as Radio Galkayo) in the Galkayo Police station, Galkayo, North East Somalia.

The training of Somalia staff at Radio Free Somalia (later known as Radio Galkayo) included qualification and graduation for the Somalia Amateur Radio license (licence).

In 1993 one of the radio amateurs to hear the training “on the air” was Bill Main, VK6ZX (now VK4ZD, 6O0X) of Rotary in Boulder, Western Australia.

Bill had many two-way amateur radio conversations from his home in Australia with the radio students at the Radio Free Somalia (now Radio Galkayo) amateur radio club station in Galkayo, Somalia.

Bill Main, VK6ZX (now VK4ZD, 6O0X) organised for Rotary to join with the Australian Government to support the Radio Free Somalia (“Free for all to use” later known as Radio Galkayo) project by purchasing new equipment for the station including this Log periodic broadcast and worldwide communications antenna.

THE PHOTO SHOWS:

1. A man with a green shirt in the middle holding one of the donated 55 MHz FM walkie talkies from Australia that were provided for coordinating the raising of the donated antenna.

2. New safety helmets that were donated by Australia for use during the raising of the donated antenna.

3. In the front with the grey and white horizontal striped shirt: Yuusuf Cali Xasan “Shareef” 6O0SC (Yusuf Ali Hasan "Shariif" 6O0SC) graduated in 1993 and received his Somalia HAM (Helping All Mankind and woMankind) radio callsign 6O0SC.

4. On the right with the grey and white vertical striped shirt: Ahmed Abdisaaq 6O0I (graduated in 1993 and received his Somalia HAM (Helping All Mankind and woMankind) radio callsign 6O0I).

5. In the back on the wall is a Somali Policeman freeing one of the antenna elements caught on barded security wire.

North East Somalia became the Puntland State of Somalia on the 1st August 1998.

(Photo Sam Voron 6O0A, VK2BVS, directing the lifting operations Abdikarim Nur Mohamud 6O0W).  

 

INDEX 1.

This new Somalia Amateur Radio website

1. Somalia.
Soomaaliya. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio  

2. Somalia photos 2 and Morse code between 0 – 1.6 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 2 iyo 0 – 1.6 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos2  

3. Somalia photos 3 and Morse code on 1.6 – 3 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 3 iyo 1.6 – 3 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos3  

4. Somalia photos 4 and Morse code on 3 – 60 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 4 iyo 3 – 60 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos4 

5. Somalia photos 5 and introduction to Non Directional Radio Beacons and NDB list from 0 to 299 kHz. 

6. Somalia photos 6 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 300 to 399 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 6 iyo NDB 300-399 kHz.

7. Somalia photos 7 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 400 to 599 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 7 iyo NDB 400-599 kHz. 

8. Somalia photos 8 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 600 to 8000 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 8 iyo NDB 600-8000 kHz. 

9. Somalia photo 9 and free VLF radio receiver.
Masawir Soomaaliya 9 iyo Radiyo VLF

DATABASE INDEX.

10. All Frequency Database Index and Somalia photos 10. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10

BROADCASTING STATIONS, 
BROADCAST STATIONS, 
RADIO BROADCASTS, 
TV BROADCASTS.
– 6.8

1 – 1.4 Long Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 10AA. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10AA 

2 – 2.5 Medium Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 11. 

2.6 Hobby AM radio stations and Somalia photos 12.
Masawir Soomaaliya 12 

3 – 3.3 Short Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 13.
Masawir Soomaaliya 13

3.4 Clandestine radio stations and Somalia photos 14.
Masawir Soomaaliya 14 

3.5 – 3.7 Pirate radio stations, online Short Wave radio receivers, scanners and Somalia photos 15. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 15 

4 – 4.4 VHF FM radio stations and Somalia photos 16. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 16 

4.5 VHF Hobby FM radio stations and Somalia photos 17. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 17

4.6 – 4.6f VHF Digital radio stations and Somalia photos 18.
Masawir Soomaaliya 18 

5 – 5.3e UHF hobby FM radio stations, UHF satellite radio and Somalia photos 19. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 19 

6 – 6.1c TV stations and Somalia photos 20.
Masawir Soomaaliya 20 

6.2a – 6.2c Hobby TV stations and Somalia photos 21. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 21 

6.3 – 6.5 Community TV, Cable TV, Public access cable TV and Somalia photos 22. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 22 

6.6 Pirate TV stations and Somalia photos 23. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 23

6.7 Satellite TV and Somalia photos 24.
Masawir Soomaaliya 24 

6.8 Amateur TV, ATV and Somalia photos 25. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 25 

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS STATIONS, 
RADIO COMMUNICATION STATIONS, 
ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM,
RADIO EMISSIONS. 
– 33.7

7 – 10.1 Frequencies below 9 kilohertz, Experimental radio below 9 kHz and Somalia photos 26. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 26 

11 – 15.10 TLF, ELF, SLF, ULF, VLF Submarine radio below 30 kHz and Somalia photos 27. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 27 

16 – 16.7 LF, Low Frequency radio 30 kHz – 300 kHz, Amateur radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 28. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 28 

17 – 17.9 MF Medium Frequency radio 300 kHz – 3 MHz, Amateur radio, Experimental radio and Somalia photos 29. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 29 

18 – 18.3 HF, High Frequency radio, Aircraft radio, Amateur Radio, Broadband Internet and Somalia photos 30. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 30 

18.4 HF CB radio, Citizen’s Band radio and Somalia photos 31. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 31 

18.5 – 18.6 HF Experimental radio and Somalia photos 32. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 32 

18.7 – 18.21 HF Ship Radio, Jamming stations, Radar, Radio Astronomy, online HF radios and Somalia photos 33. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 33 

19 – 19.3 VHF, Very High Frequency Radio, Aviation Radio, Ham Radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 34. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 34 

19.4 – 19.17 VHF Marine radio, Police radio, Fire, Medical, Space, scanner radio and Somalia photos 35. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 35 

20 – 20.3 UHF, Ultra High Frequency radio, Amateur radio, Moon radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 36. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 36 

20.4 – 20.6w UHF CB radio, Citizen’s Band Radio, GPS Global Positioning System and Somalia photos 37. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 37 

20.7 – 20.20 UHF Police radio, Fire, Medical, Boat radio, Radio Astronomy, radio scanners and Somalia photos 38. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 38 

21 – 21.3 SHF, Super High Frequency radio, Ham radio, Cosmic Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 39. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 39 

21.4 – 21.10 SHF Internet Wireless Local Area Networks LAN, Radar, Radio Astronomy, Satellites and Somalia photos 40. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 40 

22 – 22.7 EHF, Extremely High Frequency radio, CMBR Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 41. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 41 

23 – 23.4 THF, Tremendously High Frequency radio, Radio Astronomy, Satellites, Laser, and Somalia photos 42. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 42 

24 – 24.1 Infrared, Infrared radiation, Infrared astronomy, Experimental Infrared radiation and Somalia photos 43. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 43 

25. Light, Visible light radiation, Light communications, Optical astronomy and Somalia photos 44. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 44 

26. UV, Ultraviolet, Ultraviolet radiation, Ultraviolet astronomy and Somalia photos 45. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 45 

27. X-rays, X-ray radiation, X-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 46. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 46 

28 Gamma-rays, Gamma-ray radiation, Gamma-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 47 
Masawir Soomaaliya 47 

29 Cosmic rays, Cosmic ray particles from outer space, Cosmic ray astronomy and Somalia photos 48. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 48

30 – 31. Online radio measurement converters, electronics calculations, electrical calculators and Somalia photos 49. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 49 

32 – 33.7 Radio frequency allocation plans, radio codes, Amateur radio clubs and Somalia photos 50. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 50 




INDEX 2.

The 
Index for the old Somalia 
Ham Radio website is at the bottom of page 1: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio




Contact: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A. 

Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com