16 – 16.7 LF, Low Frequency radio 30 kHz – 300 kHz, Amateur radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 28.


                                                                                         Low Frequency LF radio.  

                                                                                                   26 October 2009. 


LF COMMUNICATIONS AND EMISSIONS from 30 kHz – 300 kHz.

 

The All Frequency Database Index is here: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos10

 

You are here:

16. Low Frequency Radio Communications and Emissions.

16.1 LF Amateur Radio.

16.2 LF DGPS Radio.

16.3 LF Experimental Radio.

16.3w LF Marine Radio.

16.4 LF Military radio.

16.5 LF NDB Radio. 

16.6 LF Radio Astronomy.

16.7 LF Radio navigation.

16.8 LF Time Signal radio stations.

 

Index summery:

Low Frequency LF radio from 30 kHz – 300 kHz.

LF Radio Communications and Emissions.

16. Low Frequency Radio Communications and Emissions.

16.1 Low Frequency Amateur Radio.

16.2 Low Frequency DGPS Radio.

16.3 Low Frequency Experimental Radio.

16.3w Low Frequency Marine Radio.

16.4 Low Frequency Military radio.

16.5 Low Frequency NDB Radio.

16.6 Low Frequency Radio Astronomy.

16.7 Low Frequency Radio navigation.

16.8 Low Frequency Time Signal radio stations.

 

16. Long Wave Radio Communications and Emissions.

16.1 Long Wave Amateur Radio.

16.2 Long Wave DGPS Radio.

16.3 Long Wave Experimental Radio.

16.3w Long Wave Marine Radio.

16.4 Long Wave Military radio.

16.5 Long Wave NDB Radio.

16.6 Long Wave Radio Astronomy.

16.7 Long Wave Radio navigation.

16.8 Long Wave Time Signal radio stations.

 

 

 

16.

LF Radio Communications and Emissions.

Low Frequency radio communications stations and emissions.

Low Frequency communications stations and emissions.

Low Frequency radio stations and emissions.

 

Low Frequency (Long Wave) communications stations and LF emissions.

Low Frequency radio communications stations and other LF radio emissions are here.

Long Wave radio broadcast stations, clandestine radio and pirate radio are in 1 – 1.4 (broadcast section).

LF 30 – 300 kHz.

LF 30 kHz – 300 kHz.

LF 30000 Hz – 300000 Hz.

LF 0.03 – 0.3 MHz.

LF 0.03 MHz – 0.3 MHz.

 

Introduction to Low Frequency LF DX, the hobby of listening to distant Low Frequency LF radio stations and natural Low Frequency radio emissions between 30 kHz to 300 kHz.

 

LF 30 – 300 kHz.

Low Frequency (LF) radio signals have Long Wave (LW) lengths called Kilometric waves.

 

The hobby of Long Wave radio DX.

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave LW radio listening.

The hobby of Non Directional Beacon NDB DXing.

The hobby of Long distance Non Directional Beacon (NDB) radio listening.

The hobby of aircraft NDB DX.

The hobby of Long distance Aircraft Non Directional Beacon radio listening.

The hobby of marine NDB DX.

The hobby of Long distance marine Non Directional Beacon radio listening.

The hobby of LW amateur radio DX,

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave amateur radio station listening and transmitting.

The hobby of LW time signal radio DX.

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave time signal radio listening.

The hobby of LW utility radio station DX.

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave utility radio station listening.

The hobby of LW time signal radio DX.

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave time signal radio listening.

The hobby of LW natural radio emission DX.

The hobby of Long distance Long Wave listening to the natural radio emissions of the Earth and from space.

Radio Astronomy on LF.

 

LF DX is long distance Low Frequency radio listening.

LF DX is long distance Low Frequency radio hunting.

LF DXer is a long distance Low Frequency radio listener.

LF DXing is the searching for long distance Low Frequency radio signals.

 

Introduction to Low Frequency LF radio.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_frequency

 

16.1

Amateur Radio.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio.

LF Amateur Radio.

Amateur Radio on LF.

Amateur radio stations are individual citizens in every country of the world who communicate and experiment with radio transmitters and radio receivers. You can hear some amateur radio stations on Long Wave radio.

Transmitting through the Earth 0 kHz – 3.5 MHz, 0 – 3.5 MHz.

Ground conduction communications on very low frequency 6 kHz.

Ground conduction communications on low frequency 73 kHz and 136 kHz.

Ground conduction communications on 73 kHz (4100 metre band).

Ground conduction communications on 136 kHz (2200 metre band).

Ground conduction communications on high frequency 3.5 MHz.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/lapthorn/earthcomms.pdf

Australian amateur radio promotes experimentation using Earth conduction communication on VLF.

http://www.djirra.com/ecc/about

Transmitting through water 10 kHz to 2000 kHz, (10 kHz to 2 MHz).

Amateur radio underwater experiments.

Under water communications.

Under water radio communications.

Transmission characteristics of radio waves underwater on frequencies from 10 kHz to 2000 kHz (10 kHz to 2 MHz).

Water conductivity.

Attenuation of radio waves in water.

Underwater attenuation of radio waves across different frequencies.

Underwater attenuation of radio waves from 10 kHz to 2 MHz versus Frequency.

http://www.qsl.net/vk5br/UwaterComms.htm

Data base of the countries where Amateur Radio stations are using the 136 kHz long wave band (135.8 kHz – 137.9 kHz). 

http://www.wireless.org.uk/countries.htm

 

Australia.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in Australia.

LF amateur radio in Australia.

Australian LF amateur radio band.

Australia LF amateur radio band.

LF band in kilohertz.

135.8 kHz – 137.9 kHz.

LF band in megahertz.

0.135.8 MHz – 0.137.9 MHz.

LF band in Hertz.

135800 MHz – 137900 Hz.

2200 metre band, 2200 meter band 135.8 kHz – 137.9 kHz.

135.8 kHz – 137.9 kHz 2200 metre band (1800 meter band).

2200 metre band plan, 2200 meter band plan.

135.7 - 137.4 kHz Morse code (CW) only.

135.7 - 135.8 kHz International long distance (DX) communications window.

135.8 - 136.0 kHz Test transmissions and test beacons.

136.0 - 137.4 kHz Normal Morse code (CW) operation (centered on 136.5 kHz).

137.4 - 137.6 kHz Narrow band digital transmissions e.g. PSK (centered on 137.5 kHz)

137.6 - 137.8 kHz Slow Morse code (CW) transmissions e.g. QRSS.

The Aussie (Australian, Australia) 2200 metre band is 135.8 kHz – 137.9 kHz (0.135.8 MHz – 0.137.9 MHz) using narrow band modes of transmission (such as Morse code and narrow digital transmissions) with a maximum antenna radiated power of 1 Watt effective isotopic radiated power (1 Watt e.i.r.p.).

To achieve the legal antenna radiated power of 1 Watt EIRP with the normal low efficiency low frequency antenna it is necessary for the actual transmitter output power to be much higher than 1 Watt.

In January 2009 the Australian Radio Frequency Spectrum Plan was amended by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) to create the first Low Frequency amateur radio band in Australia.

Low Frequency radio listeners can use free to download computer software to see on their computer very low power radio signals over large distances as well as radio signals under the noise.

This band was made available to radio amateurs worldwide in the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) World Radio Conference (WRC) in 2007.

From June 2009 the 135.7 kHz to 137.8 KHz band is available to all holders of the Australian Advanced Amateur radio license by applying to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

By the end of 2009 or in 2010 the ACMA will allow use of this band to all holders of the Australian Advanced Amateur radio license without the need for Amateur Radio Operators to specially apply.

Australia’s contribution to the successful worldwide adoption of a new amateur radio band in 2007.

http://www.wia.org.au/newsevents/news/2005/20050314-1/documents/Agenda%20Item%201.15.pdf

Digital radio transmissions.

Page 23 - 33: Experimental radio transmission systems.

Wanjina FDK digital transmission (FDK, Frequency Difference Keying) compared to QRSS, DFCW, VFSKCW, BPSK and Wolf.

Page 56 - 63: Low frequency antennas. Antennas for low frequency transmission and reception including short vertical antennas (electric field probes), tuned long wire antennas (electric field probes), Earth antennas (wires connected directly into the Earth), Loop antennas (magnetic loop antennas), top loaded vertical antennas.

Page 140 – 143: Cliff Hander Antenna.

http://www.djirra.com/vk2zto_legacy/docs/vk2zto_legacy.pdf

137.4 kHz VK3XU Melbourne, Australia beacon using 50 Watts to an inverted wire antenna is heard in Sale, Victoria and Sydney, NSW. This is an effective radiated power of 6 milliwatts. Listen Saturday and Sunday afternoons and evening. More reception reports are requested.

http://www.southgatearc.org/news/august2009/australian_137khz_beacon_on_the_air.htm 

Loop antenna from 150 kHz – 490 kHz.

http://users.tpg.com.au/users/ldbutler/ActiveLoopConverter.htm

Loop antenna from 12 kHz – 490 kHz.

http://users.tpg.com.au/users/ldbutler/ActiveloopVLF.htm

By using the signals from two antennas to control their relative amplitudes and control the phase of one of them, unwanted signal or unwanted noise can be removed. A circuit is described which uses the signal from a wire antenna to cancel against the signal output from an LF loop antenna.

http://users.tpg.com.au/users/ldbutler/LFNoiseCancel.htm


Belgium. 
Low Frequency Amateur Radio in Belgium
LF Amateur Radio in 
Belgium.
Low Frequency 
Belgium Amateur Radio.
LF 
Belgium Amateur Radio.

Free QRSS (Slow Morse code transmission) software to transmit and receive QRSS.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/software.htm

136 kHz Antenna data base. How to build 35 antennas for 136 kHz.

136 kHz Test equipment data base. 13 ways to test your 136 kHz antenna.

136 kHz Radio Receiver data base. 23 ways to receive on 136 kHz.

136 kHz Radio Transmitter data base. How to build 23 transmitters for 136 kHz.

136 kHz RF oscillator data base. How to build 8 Radio Frequency oscillators for 136 kHz.

136 kHz Filter data base. How to build 8 Audio Filters and noise reduction for 136 kHz.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/136brew.htm


Canada. 
Low Frequency Amateur Radio in Canada
LF Amateur Radio in 
Canada.
Low Frequency 
Canadian Amateur Radio.
LF 
Canadian Amateur Radio.


Germany. 
Low Frequency Amateur Radio in Germany. 
LF Amateur Radio in Germany.
Low Frequency German Amateur Radio.
LF German Amateur Radio.


Italy.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in Italy.

LF amateur radio in Italy.

Incremental Frequency Keying (IFK) was first suggested by Steve Olney VK2ZTO and has been used on Low Frequency in the 4 Hz bandwidth JASON software by Alberto de Bene I2PHD. (Also see IFK+ in the New Zealand section)

http://www.weaksignals.com

Build a 200 Watt transmitter for 136 kHz by IK2PII.

http://www.qsl.net/ik2pii/lf/tx200w.htm

Build a 136 kHz superheterodyne receiver by IK2PII.

http://www.qsl.net/ik2pii/lf/okqrssrx.htm

Build a 136 kHz antenna loading coil by IK2PII.

http://www.qsl.net/ik2pii/lf/lf_coil.htm

136 kHz radio signals received in Italy by IK2PII.

http://www.qsl.net/ik2pii/lf/ss/ss136khz.htm 


New Zealand.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in New Zealand.

LF amateur radio in New Zealand.

New Zealand LF amateur radio band.

LF band in kilohertz.

130 kHz – 190 kHz.

LF band in megahertz.

0.130 MHz – 0.190 MHz.

1750 meter band, 1750 metre band 130 kHz – 190 kHz.

130 kHz – 190 kHz is the 1750 meter band (1750 metre band).

The Kiwi (New Zealand) 1750 metre band is 130 kHz – 190 kHz (0.130 MHz – 0.190 MHz) using all transmission modes with bandwidths under 6 kHz such as AM voice transmission, Narrow Band FM (NBFM voice transmission), SSB voice transmission, CW (Morse code) and narrow digital transmissions with a maximum antenna radiated power of 5 Watt effective isotopic radiated power (5 Watt e.i.r.p.).

Due to the low efficiency of low frequency antennas the actual transmitter output power is much higher than 5 Watts.

June 2009 New Zealand amateur radio frequency allocation plan.

http://www.nzart.org.nz/maps/2009/2009-bp1-2.pdf

Progress with Digital Modes and Techniques in New Zealand. 

Click- NEW ZEALAND PROGRESS REPORT.

Incremental Frequency Keying IFK was first suggested by Steve Olney VK2ZTO and is seen in the Jason software (in the Italy section). DominoEX (IFK+) is a computer-based radio mode intended for simplex chat-mode (real time keyboard chat) operation on the lower frequency bands but is excellent from LF to VHF.

DominoEX allows perfect copy of 77 words per minute Morse code with 260 Hertz bandwidth

DominoEX is tolerant of drift and frequency error.

DominoEX has improved robustness in NVIS propagation conditions especially against multi-path effects that are common at night on low frequencies.

http://www.qsl.net/zl1bpu/DOMINO/Index.htm

http://www.qsl.net/zl1bpu/ZL2AFP 


United Kingdom (UK).

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in the UK. 
LF Amateur Radio in the UK. 
Low Frequency UK Amateur Radio. 
LF UK Amateur Radio. 
Mobile on 136 kHz. 
Put 136 kHz in the car and go mobile. 
237 km radio contact with a 136 kHz antenna on the car. 

USA.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in the USA.

LF Amateur Radio in the USA.

Low Frequency Amateur Radio in the US.

LF Amateur Radio in the US.

A home made 136 kHz – 137 kHz Class-D 1000 Watt (1 kW) transmitter by W1VD.

http://www.w1vd.com/137-500KWTX.html 

 


Radio equipment reviews by amateur radio operators.

Owner reviews of Amateur Radio Equipment Repairers.

Owner reviews of Amateur Radio Books.

Owner reviews of Amateur Radio Magazines.

Owner reviews of HF Amplifiers.

Owner reviews of VHF Amplifiers.

Owner reviews of UHF Amplifiers.

Owner reviews of Microwave Amplifiers.

Owner reviews of Antenna Analyzers.

Owner reviews of Antenna Baluns.

Owner reviews of Antenna Rotators.

Owner reviews of Antenna Accessories.

Owner reviews of Antenna Switches.

Owner reviews of Antenna Tuners.

Owner reviews of VHF Omni-directional Antennas Omni-directional (Verticals, etc).

Owner reviews of UHF Omni-directional Antennas Omni-directional (Verticals, etc).

Owner reviews of HF Directional Antennas (Yagi, quad, log periodic, etc).

Owner reviews of HF Mobile Antennas.

Owner reviews of HF Mobile Antenna Accessories.

Owner reviews of HF Portable Antennas.

Owner reviews of VHF Directional Antennas (Yagi, Quad, etc.)

Owner reviews of ATV Amateur Television equipment.

Owner reviews of Batteries & Chargers for walkie talkies (NiCad, NiMH, etc).

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Books.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Manuals.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Videos.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Podcasts.

Owner reviews of Contesting Hardware.

Owner reviews of DC Power Supply Distribution Panels.

Owner reviews of Digital Multi-mode decoders.

Owner reviews of Direction Finding equipment.

Owner reviews of DXpedition (DX expedition) Rentals.

Owner reviews of Electron Tubes.

Owner reviews of Electronic Parts Suppliers.

Owner reviews of Emergency Power products.

Owner reviews of generators.

Owner reviews of solar panels.

Owner reviews of wind power generators

Owner reviews of thermal power generators etc

Owner reviews of Feed lines (coax, ladder-line, etc.)

Owner reviews of AC Line filters.

Owner reviews of DSP Filters,

Owner reviews of Audio Filters.

Owner reviews of RF Filters.

Owner reviews of Band Pass Filters.

Owner reviews of Low Pass Filters.

Owner reviews of High Pass Filters.

Owner reviews of GPS receivers for APRS Automatic Position Reporting System.

Owner reviews of Ham Call Sign Accessories.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Awards.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Book Resellers.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio education material.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Exam Preparation Materials.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Insurance Policies.

Owner reviews of Ham Radio Kits.

Owner reviews of Ham Repeater Controllers.

Owner reviews of Ham Repeaters.

Owner reviews of Ham Shack Accessories.

Owner reviews of Ham Shack Clocks.

Owner reviews of Ham Software (logging software etc).

Owner reviews of Ham Work Bench Tools.

Owner reviews of Test Equipment.

Owner reviews of Headphones.

Owner reviews of Boom Microphone Headsets.

Owner reviews of radio to computer interfaces.

Owner reviews of radio to amplifier interfaces.

Owner reviews of Keyers.

Owner reviews of CW Keyboards.

Owner reviews of Morse code Keys.

Owner reviews of Morse code Paddles.

Owner reviews of Lightning and Surge Protection.

Owner reviews of Lightning and Surge Suppression.

Owner reviews of Microphone Equalizers.

Owner reviews of Transmitter Audio Accessories.

Owner reviews of Microphones.

Owner reviews of Packet radio TNC Terminal Node Controller.

Owner reviews of Power Supplies.

Owner reviews of low power QRP transmitter Accessories.

Owner reviews of low power QRP Radio transmitters.

Owner reviews of QSL printers.

Owner reviews of call sign badge engravers.

Owner reviews of Receiver Accessories.

Owner reviews of Receive Pre-amps (pre Amplifiers).

Owner reviews of Commercial Receivers modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of Military Receivers modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of Marine Receivers modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of General Coverage Receivers

Owner reviews of Scanner Receivers.

Owner reviews of Vintage amateur receivers.

Owner reviews of Weather Alert Speaker receivers.

Owner reviews of Specialized Amateur Communication Products.

Owner reviews of SWR meters.

Owner reviews of Power Watt meters.

Owner reviews of Dummy Loads.

Owner reviews of Third-party Equipment for Ham Radio Products

Owner reviews of Antenna Tower.

Owner reviews of Antenna Installers

Owner reviews of Tower Installers.

Owner reviews of Antenna Masts

Owner reviews of Antenna Mast Accessories.

Owner reviews of HF Transceivers (including HF with VHF and UHF).

Owner reviews of base and mobile VHF UHF Transceivers.

Owner reviews of hand held VHF UHF Transceivers.

Owner reviews of Commercial Transmitters modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of Military Transmitters modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of Marine Transmitters modified to Ham Radio.

Owner reviews of Vintage Transmitters.

Owner reviews of Transverters.

Owner reviews of Voice Keyers.

Owner reviews of Weather Stations.

See all the radio equipment receiver and transmitter reviews on http://www.eham.net/reviews

 

Introduction to Amateur Radio.

Africa (French, Arabic, English).

Amateur Radio in Africa. 

https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/amateur-radio-in-africa


Australia, Canada, USA and worldwide (English).

Amateur Radio in Australia, USA, Canada and worldwide.

http://www.wia.org.au

http://www.wedothat-radio.org

http://www.wedothat-radio.org/wedothat

http://wedothatradio.wordpress.com

http://www.wedothat-radio.org/hello/become-a-ham-do-it-yourself.php


Middle East (Arabic, Persian, English).

Amateur Radio in the Middle East.

https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/amateur-radio-in-the-middle-east


Portugal (Portuguese).

Amateur Radio in Portugal.

Rádio-Amadores de Portugal.

http://www.radioamadores.net

 

Puerto Rico (Spanish).

Amateur Radio in Puerto Rico.

Liga Puertorriqueña de Radioaficionados.

http://www.prarl.org


Somalia (Somali, Arabic, English).

Amateur Radio in Somalia.

Somalia Amateur Radio Friendship and Emergency Network (SARFEN).

https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio 

http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio 

  

Spain (Spanish).

Amateur Radio in Spain (Spanish).

Unión de Radioaficionados Españoles.

http://www.ure.es 


Worldwide Amateur Radio station database.

Enter the call sign and see the name and information of the amateur radio station.

http://www.qrz.com

 

 

 

16.2

DGPS Radio.

Low Frequency Differential Global Positioning System.

Low Frequency DGPS Radio.

LF DGPS Radio.

Differential Global Positioning System DGPS Radio.

Introduction to DGPS DX, the hobby of listening to distant Differential Global Positioning System radio stations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_Global_Positioning_System

Australia.

Data base of the Australian Differential Global Positioning System DGPS.

Australian DGPS Differential Global Positioning System.

Click to download- DGPS IN AUSTRALIA.

 


16.3

Experimental Radio.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio.

LF Experimental Radio.

Low (Low) Frequency (f) Experimental Radio (er).

Lowfer.

LowFER.

Includes legal no-license-needed Experimental Radio Transmitters.

Low Frequency low power experimental radio.

The hobby of listening to low frequency low power (micro) radio beacons.

The hobby of listening to experimental low frequency radio beacons on various bands including 160 kHz – 190 kHz known as the 1750 metre band (1750 meter band).

Low Frequency radio listeners can use free to download computer software to see on their computer very low power radio signals over large distances as well as radio signals under the noise.

Introduction to LowFER (Low Frequency Experimental Radio).

http://www.altair.org/lowfer.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LowFER

http://www.lwca.org/sitepage/part15/index.htm

BUILD A SIMPLE LOW FREQUENCY TRANSMITTER.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/lftx.htm

BUILD A HIGH GAIN LOW FREQUENCY PREAMPLIFIER FOR A LOOP ANTENNA.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/preamp/preamp.htm

BUILD A 160 – 190 kHz LOOP ANTENNA.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/listen/listn1.htm

BUILD A SINGLE TURN LOOP ON LF.

A simple single turn loop on low frequencies.

http://www.qsl.net/k0lr/simple-loop/Simple-Loop.htm

BUILD A TUNABLE LOW FREQUENCY TEST TRANSMITTER FOR TESTING ANTENNAS from 150 – 300 kHz.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/test-tx/test-tx.htm

Audio of Lowfer (1 Watt) Low Frequency signals.

Photos of Low Frequency antennas.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/listen2/listn2.htm

Photos of Low Frequency antennas.

http://www.qsl.net/k0lr/LTWT-verticals/VERTS.HTM

MODIFYING THE MFJ259 to cover 100 kHz – 170 MHz.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/mfj259.zip

http://www.kc3ol.dynip.com/downloads/mfj259.zip

BUILD A 130 to 190 kHz SYNTHESIZED LOW FREQUENCY TRANSMITTER WITH BUILT-IN KEYER. 

130 to 190 kHz low frequency transmitter tunes in 100 Hz steps.

130 to 190 kHz low frequency transmitter with built-in identifier for both Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and Morse code (CW) operation.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/all-in-one/all-in-1.htm

BUILD A LOW FREQUENCY TRANSMITTER WITHOUT SOLDERING.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/proto/LFproto.htm#Solderless LowFER Transmitter

BUILD A LOW FREQUENCY SOFTWARE DEFINED RECEIVER.

BUILD A LOW FREQUENCY SDR RECEIVER.

BUILD A LOW FREQUENCY DOWNCONVERTER to make your computer become a low frequency radio receiver.

How to use Spectrum Lab software.

How to use Spectrogram software.

How to use Waterfall software.

http://www.qsl.net/k0lr/SW-RX/sw-rx.htm#Downconverter with FET input stage

Argo software is used to display slow Morse code CW (QRSS).

Argo software was used in transoceanic USA Europe low frequency communications.

Argo and Spectran have similar performance but Argo interacts better with the computer soundcard and is specially made for slow Morse code QRSS reception. 

http://www.weaksignals.com

With QRSS (computer controller very slow Morse code) you can overcome high noise and interference and dig signals out of the noise.

Free software for your computer to receive LowFER radio beacon signals.

Free software for your computer to transmit QRSS LowFER radio beacon signals.

Free software to make your computer into a soundcard based digital oscilloscope.

Free software to crop and convert JPEG files to the Slow Scan Television SSTV (Picture transmission and reception on radio) Martin M1 standard (320x240 pixels).

Free software from Rik (amateur radio call sign ON7YD) in Belgium.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/software.htm

You can see the Morse code dots and the dashes on your computer screen when QRSS software is used. This makes it easy to decode the different call signs used to identify each beacon.

http://www.h-wolff.de/Hifer%20Gallery.htm

 

Australia.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio in Australia.

LF Experimental Radio in Australia.

Lowfer in Australia.

LowFER in Australia.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Australia on the following LF bands (see conditions below).

Lowfer LF bands in kilohertz.

  20.05 kHz – 70 kHz,

  70 kHz – 160 kHz,

135.7 kHz – 137.8 kHz,

145.5 kHz, 177.5 kHz and 196 kHz,

160 kHz – 285 kHz.

Lowfer LF bands in megahertz.

0.02005 MHz – 0.070 MHz,

0.070 MHz – 0.160 MHz,

0.135.7 MHz – 0.137.8 MHz,

0.145.5 MHz, 0.177.5 MHz and 0.196 MHz,

0.160 MHz – 0.285 MHz.

Lowfer LF bands in Hertz.

  20050 Hz – 70000 Hz,

  70000 Hz – 160000 Hz,

135700 Hz – 137800 Hz,

145500 Hz, 177500 Hz and 196000 Hz,

160000 Hz – 285000 Hz.

LF Bands where no radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Australia (see conditions below).

  20.05 kHz – 70 kHz 7000 metre band (7000 meter band),

  70 kHz – 160 kHz 2600 metre band (2600 meter band),

135.7 kHz – 137.8 kHz 2200 metre band (2200 meter band),

160 kHz – 285 kHz 1400 metre band (1400 meter band).

In the LF bands where no transmitter licence (license) is needed the maximum antenna radiated power is shown for each band:

7000 m band 20.05 kHz – 70 kHz no radio license required for an antenna radiated power of 0.0075 mW e.i.r.p.

2600 m band 70 kHz – 160 kHz no radio license required for an antenna radiated power of 0.003 mW e.i.r.p.

2200 m band 135.7 kHz – 137.8 kHz amateur radio license antenna radiated power of 1 W e.i.r.p., (see LF amateur radio).

Single frequencies 145.5 kHz, 177.5 kHz and 196 kHz licensed from 5 Watts e.i.r.p. to 100 Watts with Experimental Scientific Licenses issued on request to Australian amateur radio operators in 1999.

1400 m band 160 kHz – 285 kHz no radio license required for an antenna radiated power of 500 nW e.i.r.p. (0.5 µW e.i.r.p.)

A 10 Watt transmitter (RFT 81027) on 1.03 kHz and 10 kHz had an estimated antenna radiated power of 1 microwatt ERP (1 microwatt effective radiated power, 1 µW ERP which is 1.64 µW e.i.r.p. or 0.00164 mW e.i.r.p.).

Similarly because of the low efficiency of LF antennas, LF transmitters need more power output to reach the e.i.r.p. antenna radiated power limit.

http://www.qru.de/vlf.html

The Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA (Low Interference Potential Devices LIPD class license 2000) with all amendments came into effect on 1 July 2009.

LIPD allow transmitters that meet certain power levels on certain frequencies to be used without the need to apply for a license.

LIPD, (section 3, Note) states that LIPD devises must not cause radio frequency interference to other Radio communication devises.

The responsibility is on LIPD owners to resolve interference for example by retuning or stopping their operation.

LIPD, Section 3A, page 4, Definitions says: “This maximum EIRP means the largest amount of equivalent isotropically radiated power that is radiated in any direction from either an antenna that is an integral part of the transmitter or an antenna that is connected to the transmitter.”

The maximum antenna radiated power for all transmitters that do no require a license request starts on page 7, schedule 1 Transmitters, all transmitters.

Click to download the Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA (Low Interference Potential Devices LIPD) pdf - LIPD

Australia Lowfer 145.5 kHz, 177.5 kHz and 196 kHz licensed from 5 Watts e.i.r.p. to 100 Watts e.i.r.p.

Page 67: The advantages of Long Wave compared to Short Wave.

Page 55 and 65: Australia experimental scientific license (Australia scientific experimental license, Australia scientific license, Australia experimental license, Australia scientific grade license, Australian scientific assigned license).

In 1998 some Australian amateur radio operators requested licenses to transmit on the low frequency band,

VK2ZLO and other Australian amateur radio operators obtained Scientific Radio licenses (Experimental radio licenses) from the Australian Communications Authority ACA assigning them a low frequency such as 145.5 kHz, 177.5 kHz and 196 kHz for power levels from 5 Watts e.i.r.p. to 100 Watts e.i.r.p. for Low Frequency radio research.

Page 70: Steven Onley (Amateur radio call signs VK2ZTO, VK2SRO) in Sydney, Australia heard the ZL3FJ radio beacon in New Zealand on 177 kHz.

145.5 kHz AXSO (AX is Australia, SO is Steven Onley) this was Steven’s call sign when he operated with the Australia experimental scientific grade radio license (Australia scientific experimental radio license, Australia scientific radio license, Australia experimental radio license) in 1999.

177.5 kHz AXSO was also allocated to VK2ZTO under the same Australia experimental scientific license in 1999.

http://www.djirra.com/vk2zto_legacy/docs/vk2zto_legacy.pdf

See Radio Waves 0 kHz – 9 kHz, Experimental Radio 0 kHz – 9 kHz, Australia.

See VLowfer.

See LF Amateur radio 135.7 kHz - 137.8 kHz.

 

Canada.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio in Canada.

LF Experimental Radio in Canada.

Lowfer in Canada.

LowFER in Canada.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Canada on the following LF band (see conditions below).

Lowfer LF band in kilohertz.

160 kHz – 190 kHz.

Lowfer LF band in megahertz.

0.160 MHz – 0.190 MHz.

Lowfer LF band in Hertz.

160000 Hz – 190000 Hz.

LF Band where no radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in Canada (see the conditions below).

160 kHz – 190 kHz 1750 metre band (1750 meter band).

In the LF band where no transmitter licence (license) is needed the transmitter input power is shown.

1750 m band 160 kHz – 190 kHz with 1 Watt input power to the final stage of the transmitter and a specified shortened antenna or comply to a field strength limit.

Low frequency Radio Beacons have been established by individual hobby radio enthusiasts in their home to see how far such radio waves can travel.

LF hobby radio listeners can use computer aided software to extend the range at which it is possible for a radio receiver to detect these low power radio beacons.

Industry Canada 30 July 2009 radio regulations RSS-210, Annex 2, Section 2.1  Low-power licence-exempt devices operating in licence-exempt bands include the experimental 160 kHz – 190 kHz band where no license is needed for systems that limit the total input power to the final radio frequency stage of the transmitter to 1 Watt (1 W) and a shortened antenna. Example, a coaxial or twin-wire transmission line of L metres long has wire length of 2L. If a loop antenna of N turns is used with this transmission line, compute the length of wire used by the N turns, then add to 2L. The total shall not exceed 30 metres “alternatively, systems may meet the radiated measurement limits of Table 3 “General Field Strength Limits for Transmitters at Frequencies below 30 MHz” where the field strength (in microvolts per metre) in the 160 kHz – 190 kHz band does not exceed 2400/F (F in kHz) when measured 300 metres away from the antenna (section 2.6 General Field Strength Limits).

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08477.html

Section 2.6 General Field Strength Limits, Table 3 shows the field strength limits for transmitters at frequencies below 30 MHz (see 9 kHz - 490 kHz).

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08476.html

Low-power Licence-exempt Radio communication Devices

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08655.html

Industry Canada Radio Standards Specification 310 (RSS310), Issue 2, Low-power licence-exempt radio communication devices (All Frequency Bands): Category II Equipment sets out standard requirements for low-power licence-exempt radio communication devices that are certification exempt.

Section 3.7 (new section): Very low-power devices below 490 kHz: Transmitters whose fundamental emission lies below 490 kHz and for which it is shown that all emissions are at least 40 dB below the levels specified in Tables 2 and 3, are exempt from certification and only need to comply with the general provisions of RSS-310 and the applicable provisions of RSS-Gen (30 July 2009).

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08448.html

Canadian radio transmitter experimenters that might be searching for equipment that has been approved and has a power level that is documented can search the Industry Canada data base of transmitters they have tested, approved and see the power out put or field strength they recorded online.

Enter Radio Specification (for no license required) RSS210

Enter lower frequency (in MHz) 0

Enter upper frequency(in MHz) 0.190

Press search.

If you see a device you like then put the manufactures name and equipment model number in Google to find more information.

Turning the devise on and off will allow you to setup a Morse code radio beacon transmitter.

Put these details on the internet: Your frequency, how to identify your radio beacon and invite listeners to email reception reports to you.

http://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sitt/reltel/srch/nwRdSrch.do?lang=eng

 

New Zealand.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio in New Zealand.

LF Experimental Radio in New Zealand.

Lowfer in New Zealand.

LowFER in New Zealand. 

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand on the following LF band (see conditions below).

Lowfer LF band in kilohertz.

  30 kHz – 190 kHz,

130 kHz – 190 kHz.

Lowfer LF band in megahertz.

  0.30 MHz – 0.190 MHz,

0.130 MHz – 0.190 MHz.

Lowfer LF band in Hertz.

  30000 Hz – 190000 Hz,

130000 Hz – 190000 Hz.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand on the following LF bands (see conditions below).

  30 kHz – 190 kHz 2730 metre band (2730 meter band),

130 kHz – 190 kHz 1800 metre band (1800 meter band).

In the LF bands where no transmitter licence (license) is needed in New Zealand the maximum antenna radiated power is not to be more than as shown in the following bands:

2730 m band 30 kHz – 190 kHz no license required for an antenna radiated power of 10 mW e.i.r.p. (0.01 Watts e.i.r.p.)

1800 m band 130 kHz – 190 kHz amateur radio license allows 5 Watts e.i.r.p. AM, Narrow band FM, SSB, Voice radio communications,  CW Morse code radio communications and Digital radio communications (see LF amateur radio).

The Ministry of Economic Development (MED), Radio Spectrum Management, New Zealand.

5 April 2007 (page updated 18 March 2008) grants (to people in New Zealand) a general user radio licence (no one needs to apply for this license because it is granted to everyone in New Zealand) for the transmission of radio waves for the purpose of Short Range Devices (SRD), also known as Restricted Radiation Devices (RRD), Low Interference Potential Devices (LIPD) or Spread Spectrum Devices (SSD).

Schedule 1 allows (without the need to apply for a license) the use of 30 kHz – 190 kHz (0.030 MHz – 0.190 MHz) with a maximum antenna radiated power of 10 mW e.i.r.p. peak power (0.01 Watts e.i.r.p. peak power) for radio transmission of Telemetry and/or Telecommand.

http://www.rsm.govt.nz/cms/licensing/types-of-licence/general-user-licences/short-range-devices/#note1

June 2009 New Zealand amateur radio frequency allocation plan.

http://www.nzart.org.nz/maps/2009/2009-bp1-2.pdf

How to build a low frequency radio beacon.

http://www.qsl.net/zl1bpu/MICRO/EXCITER/Index.htm

See LF amateur radio.

 

USA.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio in the USA.

Low Frequency Experimental Radio in the US.

LF Experimental Radio in the USA.

LF Experimental Radio in the US.

Lowfer in the USA.

Lowfer in the US.

LowFER in the USA.

LowFER in the US.

No radio transmitter licence (license) is needed in the USA on this LF band (see conditions below).

Lowfer LF band in kilohertz.

160 kHz – 190 kHz.

Lowfer LF band in megahertz.

0.160 MHz – 0.190 MHz 1750 metre band (1750 meter band).

Lowfer LF band in Hertz.

160000 Hz – 190000 Hz.

In the LF band where no transmitter licence (license) is needed the maximum antenna radiated power is shown:

1750 m band 160 kHz – 190 kHz with an input power of 1 Watt e.i.r.p. and a 15 meter (15 metre, 49 foot) antenna. Although this is about 5 milliwatts (5 mW ERP) effective radiated power some experiments have covered thousands of kilometers (kilometers, miles).

Low frequency Radio Beacons have been established in the homes of individual hobby radio enthusiasts to see how far such radio waves can travel.

Hobby radio listeners can download free software to extend the range at which it is possible for a radio receiver to detect these low power radio beacons.

FCC radio regulations 10 July 2008, part 15, section 15.217, page 88 for radio transmitters not requiring a license includes transmissions in the experimental 160 kHz – 190 kHz band where no license is needed for systems that limit the total input power to the final radio frequency stage to 1 watt (1 W), and where the total length of transmission line, antenna and ground lead (if used) is not longer than 15 meters (15 metre, 49 feet).

All emissions above or below the 160 kHz – 190 kHz band must be attenuated by at least 20 db below the level of the unmodulated carrier.

The FCC Federal Communications Commission (10 July 2008) radio regulations Part 15 for Radio Frequency devices outlines the USA radio regulations under which an intended radiator of radio waves (radio transmitter) may be operated without a license.

Unlicensed transmitters (intended radiators) must not cause interference to other radio or TV stations. Unlicensed radio stations (intended radiators) are not protected from interference.

The FCC Federal Communications Commission 10 July 2008 radio regulations, Part 15 rules for Radio Frequency devices outlines the USA radio regulations under which an intended radiator of radio waves may be operated without a license.

Unlicensed transmitters (intended radiators) must not cause interference to other radio or TV stations. Unlicensed radio stations (intended radiators) are not protected from interference.

Part 15 rules, page 13, section 15.23 allow home built transmitters (Intentional radiators).

Home-built Lowfer transmitter radio regulations for Part 15 compliant devices.

Home built Lowfer transmitters.

Home built Lowfer radio transmitters.

Home constructed Lowfer radio transmitters.

Home-made 160 kHz radio transmitters.

Home made 160 kHz radio transmitter.

Home-made 160 kHz radio transmitter.

Home-made 160 kHz transmitter.

Home built radio transmitters.

Home built radio transmitter.

Home constructed radio transmitters.

Home constructed radio transmitter.

Home made radio transmitters.

Home made radio transmitter.

The FCC Part 15 radio regulations for home-made radio transmitter devices.

FCC 10 July 2008 Part 15 radio regulations, page 13, section 15.23 “Home-built devices” states:

(a) Equipment authorization is not required for devices that are not marketed, are not constructed from a kit and are built in quantities of 5 or less for personal use.

(b) It is recognized that the individual builder of Home-built equipment may not possess the means to perform the measurements for determining compliance with the regulations. In this case the builder is expected to employ good engineering practices to meet specified technical standards to the greatest extent practicable.

Section 15.5 also applies to home made devices (transmitters).

Page 9, Section 15.5 “General conditions of operation”.

(a). No person has a right to the continued use of current frequencies (this means that any frequency might be re-allocated for a different use in future).

(b). No harmful radio or TV interference is to be caused and interference from licensed or unlicensed stations must be accepted.

(c). Operation of the devise (transmitter) must cease if an FCC representative informs you of harmful interference caused by your devise. Operation can only restart once the cause of the interference has been corrected.

(d). Transmitters causing damped wave are prohibited (not allowed).

Part 15 rules, page 80 is the list of frequencies where intended radio emissions (transmissions) is not permitted. Only spurious emission (such as unavoidable low level harmonic radiation as a result of transmitting on another frequency) is allowed in those restricted bands.

The FCC part 15 radio regulations in the USA dated 10 July 2008.

http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/part15/PART15_07-10-08.pdf

SOME EXAMPLES OF HOME MADE TRANSMITTERS.

http://www.lwca.org/sitepage/part15/index.htm

182.200 kHz "BRO" LF Beacon Transmitter

http://www.cpinternet.com/~ki0le/pages/lftx2.htm

1 Watt 180 kHz transmitter radio beacon circuit.

http://www.wa8ywo.com/LFbeacon2.html

Using the internet to let listeners know your radio beacon frequency, call sign and if it is on or off.

http://www.w1tag.com

Experimenter’s corner.

http://www.k3pgp.org

List of Low Frequency beacons LowFER (Low Frequency no-license-required experimental radio).

A list with frequency, call sign, location and details of license-free radio beacon experimentation between 137.777 kHz and 189.950 kHz known as the 2200 metre band (2200 meter band from 135.7 kHz - 137.8 kHz) or 1750 metre band (1750 meter band from 160 kHz – 190 kHz).

Radio experimenters can add their beacon to this list, click LW message board (Long Wave message board).

Radio listeners can join the fun and report what they are hearing.

http://www.lwca.org/sitepage/part15/index.htm

Tons of free radio software.

http://www.k3pgp.org/software.htm

The radiated power of Part 15 LowFER radio beacons is estimated to be around 1 milliwatt (1 mW) and some have been heard hundreds of kilometers away. See LF transmitters on page 64.

http://www.djirra.com/vk2zto_legacy/docs/vk2zto_legacy.pdf

LowFER by W5JGV.

http://w5jgv.com/lowfer_166r5.htm

A 400 Watt Low Frequency SSB Linear Amplifier on 166 kHz by W5JGV.

http://w5jgv.com/400w-ssb-amp/index.htm

A LowFER Receiver using computer software by K0LR.

http://www.qsl.net/k0lr/SW-RX/sw-rx.htm

A LowFER QSL.

http://www.nutstreet.net/k0lr/3d-qsl.htm

 

 


16.3w

Marine Radio.

LF Marine radio.

LF Low Frequency marine radio.

LF marine stations.

LF marine radio stations.

LF coast stations.

LF coast radio stations.

LF coastal radio stations.

LF marine station frequencies.

LF marine radio station frequencies.

LF coast station frequencies.

LF coast radio station frequencies.

LF coastal radio station frequencies.

LF Maritime frequencies.

LF Ship frequencies.

LF Frequencies for ships.

LF Shipping frequencies.

LF Frequencies for shipping.

LF Boat frequencies.

LF Frequencies for boats.

LF Boating frequencies.

LF Frequencies for boating

LF Sea frequencies.

LF Frequencies for the sea.

LF Ocean frequencies.

LF Frequencies for the Ocean.

LF Maritime radio frequencies.

LF Ship radio frequencies.

LF Frequencies for ship radio.

LF Shipping radio frequencies.

LF Radio Frequencies for shipping.

LF Boat radio frequencies.

LF Radio Frequencies for boats.

LF Boating radio frequencies.

LF Radio Frequencies for boating.

LF Sea radio frequencies.

LF Radio Frequencies for the sea.

LF Ocean radio frequencies.

LF Radio Frequencies for the Ocean.

Data base of worldwide LF marine radio stations.

List of marine radio stations from 305 kHz – 4000 kHz.

View as HTML

Click- MARINE RADIO LIST IN HTML

View as PDF

http://www.coastalradio.org.uk/freqlists/coastmf.pdf

18.4 (HF CB radio) and 20.4 (UHF CB radio) can also be used on board boats.

Also see 17.4 (LF Marine Radio), 18.8 (HF Marine Radio), 19.5 (VHF Marine Radio) and 20.7 (UHF Marine Radio).

 

 

16.4

Military radio.

Low Frequency military radio stations.

LF military radio stations.

The hobby of listening to military radio stations on LF radio.

Australian LF military radio frequencies between 30 kHz to 300 kHz are listed here.

Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA radio frequency data base.

http://web.acma.gov.au/pls/radcom/assignment_range.range_lookup

United States Air Force High Frequency HF Global Communications System.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Frequency_Global_Communications_System

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/USAF_High_Frequency_Global_Communications_System

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/systems/hfgcs.htm

 

 

16.5

NDB Radio.

Non Directional Beacons.

Non Directional Radio Beacons.

Low Frequency Non Directional Beacons NDB.

LF Aviation beacons.

LF Aviation radio beacons.

LF Aviation direction finding radio beacons.

LF Aero beacons.

LF Aero radio beacons.

LF Aero direction finding radio beacons.

LF Aeronautical beacons.

LF Aeronautical radio beacons.

LF Aeronautical direction finding radio beacons.

LF Aircraft beacons.

LF Aircraft radio beacons.

LF Aircraft direction finding radio beacons.

LF Aviation NDB beacons.

LF NDB Aviation radio beacons.

LF Aviation direction finding radio beacons NDB.

LF NDB Aero beacons.

LF Aero radio NDB beacons.

LF Aero direction finding radio beacons NDB.

LF NDB Aeronautical beacons.

LF Aeronautical radio beacons.

LF Aeronautical direction finding radio beacons NDB.

LF Aircraft NDB beacons.

LF NDB Aircraft radio beacons.

LF Aircraft direction finding radio beacons NDB.

LF NDB Radio.

Introduction to NDB DX, the hobby of listening to distant Non Directional aircraft radio Beacons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-directional_beacon#Use_of_non-directional_beacons

 

World NDB data base.

Non Directional Beacons worldwide.

NDB worldwide.

World data base of aircraft navigational aids.

World data base of LW Long Wave Non Directional Beacons NDB radio navigation system.

World data base of MW Medium Wave Non Directional Beacons NDB radio navigation system.

World data base of VHF Omni-directional Radio Range VOR radio navigation system.

http://www.pilotnav.com/browsenavaids

http://worldaerodata.com/nav

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VHF_omnidirectional_range

Log of Non Directional Beacons NDB, Differential Global Positioning System DGPS, and NAVTEX (automatic navigational and meteorological warning) radio stations.

You must turn off your pop up blocker for this website but it is well worth the small effort.

http://www.classaxe.com/dx/ndb/log

If you hear an unknown NDB go to Google (international not national) and entre NDB and frequency in kHz (example NDB 338 kHz) or entre NDB and call sign (example NDB HKG) or entre NDB and frequency and call sign (example NDB 338 kHz HKG).

http://www.google.com

 

Australia.

LF Non Directional Beacons in Australia.

LF Australian Non Directional Beacons.

LF Australia Non Directional Beacons.

LF NDB in Australia.

LF Australian NDB.

LF Australia NDB.

LF Australia data base of Non Directional Beacons NDB.

http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos2  

http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/non-directional-beacons 

Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA frequency data base.

http://web.acma.gov.au/pls/radcom/assignment_range.range_lookup

 

Czech Republic (Czech langauge).

Non Directional Beacons in the Czech Republic.

Czech Republic Non Directional Beacons.

NDB in the Czech Republic.

Czech Republic NDB.

The latest NDB signals heard in the Czech Republic.

http://www.csdxc.cz

 

New Zealand.

Non Directional Beacons in New Zealand.

New Zealand Non Directional Beacons.

NDB in New Zealand.

New Zealand NDB.

New Zealand Non Directional Beacons NDB data base.

List of New Zealand Non Directional Beacons NDB.

List of New Zealand NDB Non Directional Beacons.

New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development, Radio spectrum management, New Zealand.

Online search of the radio transmitter data base in New Zealand.

To find all NDB stations in New Zealand look for License Type and select RADIO DET- RADIO BEACON (VOR, NDB) and then press SEARCH. Press NEXT at the end of the list to see more PRS radio repeater stations.

http://www.rsm.govt.nz/smart-web/smart/page/-smart/domain/licence/SelectLicencePage.wdk?fromHome=Yes

 

USA.

Non Directional Beacons in the USA.

USA Republic Non Directional Beacons.

NDB in the USA.

USA Republic NDB.

Non Directional Beacons in the US.

US Republic Non Directional Beacons.

NDB in the US.

US Republic NDB.

List of USA Non Directional Beacons NDB and worldwide high power Non Directional Beacons.

http://www.dxinfocentre.com/ndb.htm

 

See more in 17.8 (MF NDB Radio).

 


16.6

Radio Astronomy.

Low Frequency Radio Astronomy.

LF Radio Astronomy

Buy a Radio telescope. 

40 KHz LF radio telescope  (with the Antenna, Software and Computer Interface Cable, Power Supply and Instruction Manual) $180. 

The LF Receiver will display any solar ehancements reaching the D Layer of the earths atmosphere.  http://www.nitehawk.com/rasmit/jml0.html 

Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers (SARA). 

HOW TO BUILD A RADIO TELESCOPE. 

http://www.radio-astronomy.org

 

16.7

Radio navigation.

Low Frequency Radio navigation.

LF Radio navigation.

The hobby of listening to the American Long Range radio navigation (LORAN) stations from 90 kHz to 110 kHz and the Russian Long Range radio navigation (Chayka, “seagull”) stations on 100 kHz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LORAN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAYKA

http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/Loran/default.htm

http://tf.nist.gov/timefreq/service/lorantrace.htm

 

 

16.8

Time Signal radio stations.

Low Frequency Time Signal stations.

LF Time Signal radio stations.

Introduction to low frequency time signal radio stations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WWVB

http://tf.nist.gov/stations/wwvb.htm

WWVB coverage map.

http://tf.nist.gov/stations/wwvbcoverage.htm

Page 73 and 157 – 159: Australian experiments by amateur radio operator Steven Onley, call signs VK2ZTO and VK2SRO in Sydney, listening on 60 kHz to the USA radio time signal station WWVB.

http://www.djirra.com/vk2zto_legacy/docs/vk2zto_legacy.pdf

 

 

The leaders of South Galkayo and North Galkayo at the Somalia Amateur Radio license graduation.

The first Amateur Radio training course conducted in Galkayo, North East Somalia.


Closeup - In August 1993 the leaders of South Galkayo and North Galkayo presented Somalia Amateur Radio licenses with HAM (Helping All Mankind and woMankind) radio callsigns to each successful graduate of the first Amateur Radio training course conducted by Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A of Sydney, Australia in Galkayo, North East Somalia  

These students were the first volunteer staff of Radio Free Somalia (“free for all to use” known later as Radio Galkayo).

RIGHT TO LEFT SITTING AROUND THE TREE ARE:

1. Side of face visible: ?

2. Light coloured beard: ?

3. Dark coloured beard: ?

4. Man behind and to the right of (3.) looking at the camera: ?

LEFT TO RIGHT SITTING ON CHAIRS ARE:

5. Secretary for Col. Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed: ?

6. Col. Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed, Somali Salvation Democratic Front SSDF Emergency committee chairman and later he was the President of Somalia from 10 October 2004 till 29 December 2009).

7. Guard behind Col. Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed: ?

8. Leader of South Galkayo: ?

9. Guard behind the leader of South Galkayo: ?

THE GRADUATING RADIO FREE SOMALIA (Radio Galkayo) STAFF WHO ARE STANDING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ARE:

10. Left: Standing with a white shirt next to the guard: ?

11. Vertical grey and white striped shirt: ?

12. One colour shirt: ?

13. White shirt: ?

14. Vertical grey and white striped shirt: ?

15. Mohamoud Abdi Omar Adooyo (receiving his Somalia amateur radio license with his ham radio callsign 6O0D).

16. Girl in brown and white dress: ?

17. Girl in pink and white dress: ?

18. Blue shirt: Abdullahi Hersi Mahamud (receiving his Somalia amateur license with his ham radio callsign 6O0HX).

19: Red and blue shirt: Jamal Farah Adan (receiving his Somalia amateur license with his ham radio callsign 6O0JFA).

20. Standing right: Standing with a white shirt and looking at the camera: ?

21. Top right corner with the side of the face visible: ?

22. Standing with his back on the tree and the side of the face visible: ?

23 Sitting in front of the standing students: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A the Somalia amateur radio training course instructor from Sydney, Australia.

(Photo Sam Voron 6O0A, VK2BVS).  


INDEX 1.

This new Somalia Amateur Radio website


1. Somalia.
Soomaaliya. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio  

2. Somalia photos 2 and Morse code between 0 – 1.6 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 2 iyo 0 – 1.6 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos2  

3. Somalia photos 3 and Morse code on 1.6 – 3 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 3 iyo 1.6 – 3 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos3  

4. Somalia photos 4 and Morse code on 3 – 60 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 4 iyo 3 – 60 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos4 

5. Somalia photos 5 and introduction to Non Directional Radio Beacons and NDB list from 0 to 299 kHz. 

6. Somalia photos 6 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 300 to 399 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 6 iyo NDB 300-399 kHz.

7. Somalia photos 7 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 400 to 599 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 7 iyo NDB 400-599 kHz. 

8. Somalia photos 8 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 600 to 8000 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 8 iyo NDB 600-8000 kHz. 

9. Somalia photo 9 and free VLF radio receiver.
Masawir Soomaaliya 9 iyo Radiyo VLF

DATABASE INDEX.

10. All Frequency Database Index and Somalia photos 10. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10

BROADCASTING STATIONS, 
BROADCAST STATIONS, 
RADIO BROADCASTS, 
TV BROADCASTS.
– 6.8

1 – 1.4 Long Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 10AA. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10AA 

2 – 2.5 Medium Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 11. 

2.6 Hobby AM radio stations and Somalia photos 12.
Masawir Soomaaliya 12 

3 – 3.3 Short Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 13.
Masawir Soomaaliya 13

3.4 Clandestine radio stations and Somalia photos 14.
Masawir Soomaaliya 14 

3.5 – 3.7 Pirate radio stations, online Short Wave radio receivers, scanners and Somalia photos 15. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 15 

4 – 4.4 VHF FM radio stations and Somalia photos 16. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 16 

4.5 VHF Hobby FM radio stations and Somalia photos 17. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 17

4.6 – 4.6f VHF Digital radio stations and Somalia photos 18.
Masawir Soomaaliya 18 

5 – 5.3e UHF hobby FM radio stations, UHF satellite radio and Somalia photos 19. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 19 

6 – 6.1c TV stations and Somalia photos 20.
Masawir Soomaaliya 20 

6.2a – 6.2c Hobby TV stations and Somalia photos 21. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 21 

6.3 – 6.5 Community TV, Cable TV, Public access cable TV and Somalia photos 22. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 22 

6.6 Pirate TV stations and Somalia photos 23. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 23

6.7 Satellite TV and Somalia photos 24.
Masawir Soomaaliya 24 

6.8 Amateur TV, ATV and Somalia photos 25. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 25 

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS STATIONS, 
RADIO COMMUNICATION STATIONS, 
ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM,
RADIO EMISSIONS. 
– 33.7

7 – 10.1 Frequencies below 9 kilohertz, Experimental radio below 9 kHz and Somalia photos 26. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 26 

11 – 15.10 TLF, ELF, SLF, ULF, VLF Submarine radio below 30 kHz and Somalia photos 27. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 27 

16 – 16.7 LF, Low Frequency radio 30 kHz – 300 kHz, Amateur radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 28. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 28 

17 – 17.9 MF Medium Frequency radio 300 kHz – 3 MHz, Amateur radio, Experimental radio and Somalia photos 29. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 29 

18 – 18.3 HF, High Frequency radio, Aircraft radio, Amateur Radio, Broadband Internet and Somalia photos 30. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 30 

18.4 HF CB radio, Citizen’s Band radio and Somalia photos 31. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 31 

18.5 – 18.6 HF Experimental radio and Somalia photos 32. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 32 

18.7 – 18.21 HF Ship Radio, Jamming stations, Radar, Radio Astronomy, online HF radios and Somalia photos 33. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 33 

19 – 19.3 VHF, Very High Frequency Radio, Aviation Radio, Ham Radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 34. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 34 

19.4 – 19.17 VHF Marine radio, Police radio, Fire, Medical, Space, scanner radio and Somalia photos 35. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 35 

20 – 20.3 UHF, Ultra High Frequency radio, Amateur radio, Moon radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 36. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 36 

20.4 – 20.6w UHF CB radio, Citizen’s Band Radio, GPS Global Positioning System and Somalia photos 37. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 37 

20.7 – 20.20 UHF Police radio, Fire, Medical, Boat radio, Radio Astronomy, radio scanners and Somalia photos 38. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 38 

21 – 21.3 SHF, Super High Frequency radio, Ham radio, Cosmic Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 39. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 39 

21.4 – 21.10 SHF Internet Wireless Local Area Networks LAN, Radar, Radio Astronomy, Satellites and Somalia photos 40. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 40 

22 – 22.7 EHF, Extremely High Frequency radio, CMBR Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 41. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 41 

23 – 23.4 THF, Tremendously High Frequency radio, Radio Astronomy, Satellites, Laser, and Somalia photos 42. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 42 

24 – 24.1 Infrared, Infrared radiation, Infrared astronomy, Experimental Infrared radiation and Somalia photos 43. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 43 

25. Light, Visible light radiation, Light communications, Optical astronomy and Somalia photos 44. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 44 

26. UV, Ultraviolet, Ultraviolet radiation, Ultraviolet astronomy and Somalia photos 45. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 45 

27. X-rays, X-ray radiation, X-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 46. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 46 

28 Gamma-rays, Gamma-ray radiation, Gamma-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 47 
Masawir Soomaaliya 47 

29 Cosmic rays, Cosmic ray particles from outer space, Cosmic ray astronomy and Somalia photos 48. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 48

30 – 31. Online radio measurement converters, electronics calculations, electrical calculators and Somalia photos 49. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 49 

32 – 33.7 Radio frequency allocation plans, radio codes, Amateur radio clubs and Somalia photos 50. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 50 




INDEX 2.

The 
Index for the old Somalia 
Ham Radio website is at the bottom of page 1: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio




Contact: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A. 

Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com