3. Somalia photos 3 and Morse code 1.6 - 3 MHz.


                    Listening to Morse code on Medium Wave Radio frequencies from 1.6 to 3 MHz. 
                                                                                 23 October 2009.



 

Listening to Morse code on Medium Wave Radio.

Combined with Somalia Photos 3.


The Gothenburg Initiative was established many years ago in the town of Galkaio, Somalia by people who live in Gothenburg, Sweden.


Radio Morse code from 1.6 to 3 MHz (1600 to 3000 kHz).

Morse code in the 21st century. 

Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A shows Somalia ham radio students how to hold a Morse code key.
Download the complete International Morse code-

MORSE CODKA CAALMIGA AH.

All in Somalia radio course topic 09
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic09.doc  



Morse code radio listening in Sydney, Australia from 1.6 to 3 MHz

Listening to unusual and interesting radio signals. 

Ocean Radio Beacons, ocean radio research beacons, Meteorological ocean weather beacons, Meteorological radio beacons, radio beacon drift nets, driftnet buoy radio beacons, driftnet radio buoys, captured whale radio buoy or fishing buoy transmitters are dry cell battery operated 4 to 15 Watt radio transmitters using 1.600 MHz to 2.850 MHz and a 4 metre fibre glass antenna. The normal service range of these radio beacons is 100 km (60 miles) however those listening on these Medium Wave frequencies for unusual and interesting radio signals can hear such low power signals from thousands of miles away especially during sunset, nighttime and sunrise. 


1.670 MHz 1670 kHz TG Tauranga, North Island, New Zealand. 
This 24 hour radio beacon system for aircraft Automatic Direction Finding broadcasts a radio carrier and a Morse code (CW) identification transmitting the call sign TG every 2 seconds. 21 June 2009 at 1602 UTC signal strength 7 (listen on USB).
1.725 MHz 1725 kHz GA Goroka, Papua New Guinea.
This 24 hour Non Directional Beacon NDB system for aircraft Automatic Direction Finding broadcasts a radio carrier and a Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign GA every 2 seconds. 21 June 2009 at 1602 UTC signal strength 7.  


1.733 MHz 1733 kHz 3YCB Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes the call sign 3YCB followed by a carrier of 2-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
18 June 2009 at 2034 UTC with signal strength 2.

1.735 MHz 1735 kHz OX276 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign OX276 followed by a carrier of 1-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 4 times.
18 June 2009 at 2030 UTC with signal strength 4.

 

1.750 MHz 1750 kHz WR2 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign WR2 in Morse code followed by a 2-second carriers.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2008 at 1215 UTC with signal strength 7.
GA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0338 UTC. 


1.764 MHz 1764 kHz 2AFCD Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes the call sign 2AFCD followed by a carrier of 2-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
18 June 2009 at 2023 UTC with signal strength 1.

1.765 MHz 1765 kHz 2AFWX Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes the call sign 2AFWX followed by a carrier of 2-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
18 June 2009 at 2019 UTC with signal strength 5.

1.765 MHz 1765 kHz OB282 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign OB282 followed by a carrier of 1-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 4 times.
18 June 2009 at 2014 UTC with signal strength 7.

 

1.768 MHz 1768 kHz 2AFXY Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes the call sign 2AFXY followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2050 UTC with signal strength 8. 


1.776 MHz 1776 kHz 2AFFG Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every ? minutes the call sign 2AFFG followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

1 June 2009 at 0750 UTC with signal strength 3 to 5.


1.781 MHz 1781 kHz 2AEEF Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign 2AEEF in Morse code followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2009 at 1146 UTC with signal strength 9.
2AEEF is within 300 km of Sydney 
as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0338 UTC under signal strength 8 noise.

 

1.783 MHz 1783 kHz 2ADQR Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2ADQR followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2009 at 1157 UTC with signal strength 9 and fading. 
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by several extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0345 UTC.

 

1.783 MHz 1783 kHz 2AHBD Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes the call sign 2AHBD in Morse code followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
15 May 2009 at 1807 UTC with signal strength 8. 
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by several extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0345 UTC.

 

1.784 MHz 1784 kHz 2AFHI Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes the call sign 2AFHI followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

15 May 2009 at 1804 UTC with signal strength 6. 
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0356 UTC. 


1.793 MHz 1793 kHz OA837 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign OA837 followed by a carrier of 1-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 4 times.
18 June 2009 at 2048 UTC with signal strength 3.

 

1.798 MHz 1798 kHz 2AHAD Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AHAD followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
17 May 2009 at 2010 UTC with signal strength 6.
2AHAD is within 300 km of Sydney 
as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0358 UTC of constant signal strength under the S8 noise level.

 

1.800 MHz 1800 kHz 2AFLM Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFLM followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
18 May 2009 at 2055 UTC with signal strength 8.

2AFLM is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0520 UTC.

1.803 MHz 1803 kHz 4BHI Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting in Morse code every 4 minutes the call sign 4BHI followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

30 April 2009 at 0630 UTC with signal strength 8. 
4BHI is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0131 UTC heard at constant strength under S8 noise.

 

1.804 MHz 1804 kHz 2AFMN Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting in Morse code every 4 minutes the call sign 2AFMN followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

2AFMN is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0135 UTC with signal under S8 noise.

 

1.805 MHz 1805 kHz 3TFA Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3TFA followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times. 
29 April 2009 at 0757 UTC with signal strength 5. 
3TFA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0415 UTC.

 

1.809 MHz 1809 kHz 3ADST Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3ADST followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times. 
30 April 2009 at 0757 UTC with signal strength 5. 
3ADST 
is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0430 UTC under S8 noise.

 

1.8185 MHz 1818.5 kHz SATTRAK DATA LTD (A registered company) Tinakori Hill, North Island, New Zealand.
This is an Aeronautical Non Directional Beacon NDB for the Wellington area of New Zealand. SATTRAK DATA LTD uses a data emission called 500HF1D which is a 500Hz emission bandwidth. SATTRAK DATA LTD is licensed to use 1.818250 MHz to 1.818750 MHz with a centre frequency of 1.818500 MHz at a power of 100 Watts from a Transworld TW7000 transmitter. It was earlier reported as 1.818.6 MHz 1818.6 kHz 2 alternating carrier signals each second. One carrier on 1.818.5 MHz 1818.5 kHz the other carrier on 1.818.7 MHz 1818.7 kHz. 23 May 2009 at 1255 UTC still continuing at 1400 UTC with signal strength 5. SATTRAK DATA LTD is heard daily in Sydney. On 7 August 2009 at 1254 UTC with signal strength 9 plus 5dB. (Not 1.818 MHz 1818 kHz 2 alternating carriers or 1.819 MHz 1819 kHz 2 alternating carriers).

 

1.820 MHz 1820 kHz 2AFQR Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFQR followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
15 May 2009 at 2007 UTC with signal strength 5.
2AFQR
 is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0435 UTC.

 

1.821.5 MHz 1821.5 kHz VK3AMD Amateur Radio Station, Hughesdale, Victoria, Australia. 
Allan Doble (ham radio call sign VK3AMD) was using Morse code sending “CQ three times (meaning: this is an invitation to anyone who would like to have a conversation with me) de VK3AMD K” on 17 May 2009 at 2010 UTC signal strength 9 plus 30dB and at 2053 UTC signal strength 9 plus 20dB.

(Not 1821 kHz VK3AMD or 1822 kHz VK3AMD).

 

1.822 MHz 1822 kHz 2AHAL Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AHAL followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier were transmitted 3 times. 
30 April 2009 at 0755 UTC with signal strength 5. 
Sydney daylight reception of 2AHAL on 17 May 2009 at 0637 UTC was signal strength 4 estimated.

2AFQR is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0442 UTC.

 

1.823 MHz 1823 kHz K9DX Amateur Radio Station, Barrington, Illinois, USA. John was heard calling CQ (general call inviting anyone to have a two way conversation on radio) using Morse code (CW) on 10 May 2009 at 0953 UTC with signal strength 7.

 I sent John this email “I heard you this evening in Sydney, Australia. I am using a 160m half wave dipole antenna in my home 6 km north of the Sydney harbour bridge.

Here is a reception report of your transmission. 

K9DX, amateur radio station in the USA replied to my Email reception report on 12 May 2009:

K9DX said "I was running a power of 1.5 kW (1500 Watts) to a 9 element vertical steerable antenna array pointed west (away from Australia). If I had switched the antenna towards your direction then the signal would have been a couple signal strength units higher. 

12 May 2009 reply sent by Sam Voron VK2BVS in Australia:

Your antenna is fantastic. 

I would never have imagined that such a system were behind the CQ call that I heard.

Well done!!!

I put the photo of your antenna (below) on this web page so that others can go to your web page and see more.

13 May 2009 reply sent by John Battin K9DX in the USA:

Beautiful, Thanks.

 

In Australia John had a strong signal from the USA on the 1.8 MHz (160 metre band).

Here is a photo of the antenna used by John when I heard his CQ (general call inviting anyone who would like to have a conversation) using Morse code. 

I love John's antenna and I say that every ham radio operator should have one!

Aircraft view of crop circles made by amateur radio operators to remove crops and install antennas. These are the 9 antennas used by John Battin (Ham radio call sign K9DX) on a wavelength of 160 metres to acheive world wide communications from the USA using Morse code in 2009.

See more K9DX photos: http://nidxa.org/memberWWW/k9dx_antennas.htm 

 

1.824 MHz 1824 kHz 2AFRS Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFRS followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times. 
13 May 2009 at 0528 UTC with signal strength 5. 
2AFRS 
is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0449 UTC under S8 noise. 


1.824 MHz 1824 kHz MQ5 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign MQ5 followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times. 
1 June 2009 at 1126 UTC with signal strength 3 to 5. 


1.825 MHz 1825 kHz 2AHAM Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every ? minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AHAM followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

3 June 2009 at 1447 UTC with signal strength 7. 


1.825 MHz 1825 kHz EFJ ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign EFJ followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

1 June 2009 at 1201 UTC with signal strength 3 and fading.

1.825 MHz 1825 kHz 2ABXY Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2ABXY followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

2ABXY is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0430 UTC with signal strength under S8 noise. 

1.837 MHz 1837 kHz 2AHAQ Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting in Morse code the call sign 2AHAQ followed by a 2-second carrier. 

29 April 2009 at 0746 UTC with signal strength 6.

2AFQR is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0505 UTC. 


1.841 MHz 1841 kHz 2AEAB Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign 2AEAB followed by one 2-second duration carrier.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
18 June 2009 at 2008 UTC with signal strength 7.


1.851 MHz 1851 kHz LV9 ocean radio beacon transmitting in Morse code the call sign LV9 followed by a 2-second carrier. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
2 June 2009 at 1424 UTC with signal strength 3 to 7. 


1.860 MHz 1860 kHz IX9 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes the call sign IX9 followed by a carrier of 3-second duration.
This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier is transmitted 3 times.
12 July 2009 at 0850 UTC with signal strength 3


1.871 MHz 1871 kHz Yi3EE (1.871 MHz 1871 kHz Yi3i) ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign Yi3EE followed by a 2-second carrier. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
14 June 2009 at 2212 UTC with signal strength 2 and fading. 


1.873 MHz 1873 kHz MP02 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign MP02 followed by a 2-second carrier. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
14 June 2009 at 2213 UTC with signal strength 3. 

1.910 MHz 1910 kHz SK5 ocean radio beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign SK5 followed by three 3-second carriers. 
10 May 2009 at 0958 UTC with signal strength 9. 
No Sydney sunset reception of SK5 on 17 May 2009 at 0705 UTC. 


1.957 MHz 1957 kHz 2ABBC Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting once every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2ABBC followed by three 2-second carriers. 

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
3 June 2009 at 1441 UTC with signal strength 8.

 

2.000 MHz 2000 kHz KQ8 ocean radio beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign KQ8 followed by three 3-second carriers. 
10 May 2009 at 1232 UTC with signal strength 7. 
No Sydney sunset reception of KQ8 on 17 May 2009 at 0720 UTC.

 

2.032 MHz 2032 kHz TR2 ocean radio beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign TR2 followed by three 3-second carriers. 
10 May 2009 at 1328 UTC with signal strength 0 to 2. 
When I first heard this station it was good but with changing radio conditions it took 1 more hour until I was able to identify the call sign.

You can enjoy working on the Internet while you listen to the radio to identify such weak signals. 
No Sydney sunset reception of TR2 on 17 May 2009 at 0724 UTC.

 

2.164.5 MHz 2164.5 kHz D9 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign D9 followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 time.

23 May 2009 at 1320 UTC signal strength 7 with fading. Very slight frequency shift noted on the carrier suggested battery voltage level might be slightly low. 


2.167 MHz 2167 kHz DM5 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign DM5 followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 time.

2 June 2009 at 1427 UTC. 

2.240 MHz 2240 kHz 4MWZ Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 4MWZ followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 time.

18 May 2009 at 2043 UTC fading out and at 0738 UTC signal strength 0 to 2.

4MWZ is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by sunrise fade out on 18 May 2009 at 2043 UTC.

18 May 2009 at 0738 UTC the signal strength was 0 to 2 and an occasional slight frequency shift indicates power supply voltage may be low.

 

2.267 MHz 2267 kHz 3NSH Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3NSH followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2124 UTC with signal strength 2.

3NSH is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0650 UTC.

 

2.291 MHz 2291 kHz 3MZS Australia ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3MZS followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2110 UTC with signal strength 0 to 2 and at 0720 UTC signal strength 0 to 2.

 

2.423 MHz 2423 kHz X10 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign X10 followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2000 UTC with signal strength 2.

No Sydney sunset reception of X10 on 18 May 2009 at 0708 UTC.

 

2.453 MHz 2453 kHz “5” Ocean radio beacon transmitting “de 5” (This is call sign 5) three times in Morse code every 5 minutes. 
15 May 2009 at 1952 UTC signal strength 7. 
No Sydney sunset reception of “5” on 17 May 2009 at 0730 UTC.

 

2.478 MHz 2478 kHz CA5 Ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign CA5 followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2118 UTC with signal strength 5.

No Sydney sunset reception of CA5 on 18 May 2009.

 

2.488 MHz 2488 kHz CS9 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign CS9 followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2117 UTC with signal strength 5 to 7 and at 0643 UTC signal strength 3 to 6.

 

2.514 MHz 2514 kHz CG8 (CGN, CGN8, CGGN) ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign CG8 followed by three 3-second carriers. 
10 May 2008 at 1356 UTC with signal strength 7. 
Sometimes the Morse identification would be faulty and instead of sending CG8 it sent CGN, CGN8 or CGGN. 
No Sydney early evening reception of CG8 on 17 May 2009 at 0744 UTC.

 

2.578.3 MHz 2578.3 kHz CN1 ocean radio beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign CN1 followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2124 UTC signal strength 2.

3NSH is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0650 UTC.

(Not 2578 kHz CN1 or 2578.5 kHz CN1 or 2579 kHz CN1).

 

2.844 MHz 2844 kHz KM0 Ocean radio beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code “KM0” three times. 
15 May 2009 at 1955 UTC with signal strength 6.
Sydney early evening reception of KM0 on 17 May 2009 at 0754 UTC with a weak signal
.

No Sydney afternoon reception of KM0 on 18 May 2009 at 0515 UTC.




Students at the Gothenburg Initiative mechanical training school in Galkacyo, Somalia October 2007.



 

Introduction to Morse code.



When radio was invented over 100 years ago, Morse code was the only way to communicate. 

Voice transmission was invented later. 


In 2009 who is using Morse code? 

Amateur radio operators (Ham radio operators) use Morse code as a fun way to communicate. 

Hams (Helping All mankind and woMankind) radio operators get to know other individual radio operators by the sound of their Morse code in the same way that we recognise friends by the sound of their voice. 

People who love sending SMS mobile phone messages have the same enjoyment that Radio Hams feel when they communicate with their radio friends using Morse code. 

One difference between SMS phone calls and Morse code radio conversations is that SMS mobile phone users pay for the SMS calls whereas local and worldwide ham radio Morse code (or voice or data) conversations are unlimited and free. 

Each SMS phone call is charged a fee by commercial private business.

Morse code (and voice or data) on amateur radio is a worldwide humanitarian, scientific and experimental non-commercial friendship service operated by individual citizens who use the free radio airwaves to talk with ham radio enthusiasts in every country. 

Ham radio conversations are free because they operate under the International regulations of the United Nations International Telecommunications Union to promote free worldwide friendship, disaster emergency communications assistance, scientific telecommunications research and technical training as well as in promoting human respect, education and worldwide understanding.

Another reason why local and worldwide Amateur radio calls are free is because ham radio operators do not operate their radio station for commercial or business purposes. 

Ham radios (amateur radios) are used only to promote free worldwide friendship, human respect, education and worldwide understanding as well as to assist in emergency communications both locally and in other countries during disasters and in technical education and scientific research. 

In 2009 Morse code is used by most people who have a mobile phone. 
When an SMS message arrives you hear (dit dit dit)  (daaa daaa) (dit dit dit) which is the International Morse code meaning SMS.

This page is a survey of all Morse code transmissions received in Sydney, Australia between 1.6 and 3 MHz (1600 to 3000 kHz). 

This Morse code survey will give an idea of who (apart from the amateur ham radio operators and the 900 MHz mobile radio SMS phone users as discussed above) is also using Morse code in the 21st century.

Surprisingly Morse code is found to be widely used in todays modern world doing its job silently and 24 hours a day. 

Morse code in 2009 is used everyday on land, sea, air and space from helping aircraft pilots so that you and me arrive at the airport safely through to scientific research work and more. 



The Gothenburg Initiative mechanical training school in Galkaacyo, Somalia October 2007.




 

 Morse code in the 21st century


Radio Morse code.

 

Morse code on Low Frequency (LF), Long Wave (LW), Medium Wave (MW), Short Wave (SW) and VHF (Very High Frequency) radio.

 

CW Continuous Wave (radio wave) switched on and off is Morse code on radio.

 

A long one second signal is the Morse code dash and on radio sounds like Daaa.

A short eighth of a second signal is the Morse code dot and on radio sounds like Dit.

 

MCW is a modulated CW signal (made of a radio frequency carrier signal with an audio signal) and is Morse code that can be heard on an AM receiver.

 

CW is an unmodulated CW signal (made of a radio frequency carrier with no audio signal) and is Morse code that can be heard on any receiver that has a control to select SSB (Single Side Band) or LSB (Lower Side Band) or USB (Upper Side Band) or CW (Continuous Wave) or BFO (Beat Frequency Oscillator).

 

Before a Morse code radio call sign you often hear the letters “de” meaning “This is”

d (Daaa dit dit)

e (Dit)

 




Students take an engine apart at the Gothenburg Initiative mechanical training school in Gaalkaacyo, Somalia October 2007.




 

 More about Morse code


Download more about Morse code-


International amateur radio abbreviations,
Emergency Morse code signal,
Urgency Morse code signals,

SIDA LOOSOO GAABIYO XEERKA CAALAMIGA AH EE AMITAR RAADIYOO.
All in Somalia radio course topic 07
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic07.doc   

International Q codes,
How to use the Q code,

Q CODKA CAALMIGA AH.
All in Somalia radio course topic 08
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic08.doc  

What is the International Morse Code?
How does Morse code work?
Who invented the Morse code?
How do you learn the Morse code?
How do you hold a Morse code key?
List of the Morse code.

MORSE CODKA CAALMIGA AH.
All in Somalia radio course topic 09
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic09.doc 

 

Your Email reports and comments are welcome.  



Students and training equipment at the Gothenburg Initiative mechanical training school in Galcayo, Somalia October 2007.




INDEX.

This new Somalia Amateur Radio website

1. Somalia.
Soomaaliya. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio  

2. Somalia photos 2 and Morse code between 0 – 1.6 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 2 iyo 0 – 1.6 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos2  

3. Somalia photos 3 and Morse code on 1.6 – 3 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 3 iyo 1.6 – 3 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos3  

4. Somalia photos 4 and Morse code on 3 – 60 MHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 4 iyo 3 – 60 MHz Morse codka caalmiga ah. 
http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio/somaliaphotos4 

5. Somalia photos 5 and introduction to Non Directional Radio Beacons and NDB list from 0 to 299 kHz. 

6. Somalia photos 6 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 300 to 399 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 6 iyo NDB 300-399 kHz.

7. Somalia photos 7 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 400 to 599 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 7 iyo NDB 400-599 kHz. 

8. Somalia photos 8 and Non Directional Radio Beacons list from 600 to 8000 kHz. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 8 iyo NDB 600-8000 kHz. 

9. Somalia photo 9 and free VLF radio receiver.
Masawir Soomaaliya 9 iyo Radiyo VLF

DATABASE INDEX.

10. All Frequency Database Index and Somalia photos 10. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10

BROADCASTING STATIONS, 
BROADCAST STATIONS, 
RADIO BROADCASTS, 
TV BROADCASTS.
– 6.8

1 – 1.4 Long Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 10AA. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 10AA 

2 – 2.5 Medium Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 11. 

2.6 Hobby AM radio stations and Somalia photos 12.
Masawir Soomaaliya 12 

3 – 3.3 Short Wave radio stations and Somalia photos 13.
Masawir Soomaaliya 13

3.4 Clandestine radio stations and Somalia photos 14.
Masawir Soomaaliya 14 

3.5 – 3.7 Pirate radio stations, online Short Wave radio receivers, scanners and Somalia photos 15. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 15 

4 – 4.4 VHF FM radio stations and Somalia photos 16. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 16 

4.5 VHF Hobby FM radio stations and Somalia photos 17. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 17

4.6 – 4.6f VHF Digital radio stations and Somalia photos 18.
Masawir Soomaaliya 18 

5 – 5.3e UHF hobby FM radio stations, UHF satellite radio and Somalia photos 19. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 19 

6 – 6.1c TV stations and Somalia photos 20.
Masawir Soomaaliya 20 

6.2a – 6.2c Hobby TV stations and Somalia photos 21. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 21 

6.3 – 6.5 Community TV, Cable TV, Public access cable TV and Somalia photos 22. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 22 

6.6 Pirate TV stations and Somalia photos 23. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 23

6.7 Satellite TV and Somalia photos 24.
Masawir Soomaaliya 24 

6.8 Amateur TV, ATV and Somalia photos 25. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 25 

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS STATIONS, 
RADIO COMMUNICATION STATIONS, 
ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM,
RADIO EMISSIONS. 
– 33.7

7 – 10.1 Frequencies below 9 kilohertz, Experimental radio below 9 kHz and Somalia photos 26. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 26 

11 – 15.10 TLF, ELF, SLF, ULF, VLF Submarine radio below 30 kHz and Somalia photos 27. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 27 

16 – 16.7 LF, Low Frequency radio 30 kHz – 300 kHz, Amateur radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 28. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 28 

17 – 17.9 MF Medium Frequency radio 300 kHz – 3 MHz, Amateur radio, Experimental radio and Somalia photos 29. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 29 

18 – 18.3 HF, High Frequency radio, Aircraft radio, Amateur Radio, Broadband Internet and Somalia photos 30. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 30 

18.4 HF CB radio, Citizen’s Band radio and Somalia photos 31. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 31 

18.5 – 18.6 HF Experimental radio and Somalia photos 32. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 32 

18.7 – 18.21 HF Ship Radio, Jamming stations, Radar, Radio Astronomy, online HF radios and Somalia photos 33. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 33 

19 – 19.3 VHF, Very High Frequency Radio, Aviation Radio, Ham Radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 34. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 34 

19.4 – 19.17 VHF Marine radio, Police radio, Fire, Medical, Space, scanner radio and Somalia photos 35. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 35 

20 – 20.3 UHF, Ultra High Frequency radio, Amateur radio, Moon radio, Experimental Radio and Somalia photos 36. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 36 

20.4 – 20.6w UHF CB radio, Citizen’s Band Radio, GPS Global Positioning System and Somalia photos 37. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 37 

20.7 – 20.20 UHF Police radio, Fire, Medical, Boat radio, Radio Astronomy, radio scanners and Somalia photos 38. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 38 

21 – 21.3 SHF, Super High Frequency radio, Ham radio, Cosmic Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 39. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 39 

21.4 – 21.10 SHF Internet Wireless Local Area Networks LAN, Radar, Radio Astronomy, Satellites and Somalia photos 40. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 40 

22 – 22.7 EHF, Extremely High Frequency radio, CMBR Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation from outer space and Somalia photos 41. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 41 

23 – 23.4 THF, Tremendously High Frequency radio, Radio Astronomy, Satellites, Laser, and Somalia photos 42. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 42 

24 – 24.1 Infrared, Infrared radiation, Infrared astronomy, Experimental Infrared radiation and Somalia photos 43. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 43 

25. Light, Visible light radiation, Light communications, Optical astronomy and Somalia photos 44. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 44 

26. UV, Ultraviolet, Ultraviolet radiation, Ultraviolet astronomy and Somalia photos 45. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 45 

27. X-rays, X-ray radiation, X-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 46. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 46 

28 Gamma-rays, Gamma-ray radiation, Gamma-ray astronomy and Somalia photos 47 
Masawir Soomaaliya 47 

29 Cosmic rays, Cosmic ray particles from outer space, Cosmic ray astronomy and Somalia photos 48. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 48

30 – 31. Online radio measurement converters, electronics calculations, electrical calculators and Somalia photos 49. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 49 

32 – 33.7 Radio frequency allocation plans, radio codes, Amateur radio clubs and Somalia photos 50. 
Masawir Soomaaliya 50 



The Index for the old Somalia Ham Radio website is on: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio




Contact: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A.