The King's Knight: Sir Thomas de la Pomeray (C 1355-1428)


Thomas de la Pomerai: ( circa 1355-- 1428): 
 
  • “THE first certain mention of Thomas de la Pomerai is of his marriage, without the King’s consent, in 1388, to Joan, late wife of Philip Bryene, knight, and of pardon, in October 1389,  by the King of the offence. *

  •      (Pole suggested that Thomas was the son of Robert de la Pomerai of Sandridge. p 489 ). Reichel (Extract of Hundred’s Rolls) calls him Thomas of Allaleigh (Cornworthy.)  
  •      Powley finds Pole’s suggestion “curious”  as Thomas la Pomeroy, son of Henry de la Pomeray, and father of Edward de la Pomeray, held Sandridge. 
  •      Powley notes that the marriage procedure was irregular and brought reproof upon the vicar of Beri who performed the rite.  (Page 63, Powey.) 

  
      Sir Thomas de la Pomeray , illustrated by Annie Pomeroy

An Early Notice of Thomas de la Pomeray as Soldier:

 “The Soldier in later Medieval England
,”
by Dr. Adrian R. Bell and Professor Anne Curry. 2006-2010: . 
Curry created a database by taking the muster rolls, treaty rolls, gascon rolls and scottish rolls housed in The National Archives (TNA), for the years 1369 - 1453.. See: 

http://www.icmacentre.ac.uk/soldier/database/index.php






The records which follow have been gleaned from various sources including Powley, the Soldier in Later Medieval England Database, The Close Rolls, The Parliament Rolls, and Land records:

                                                                                                                                                 Esquire with  3 Archers

1388: Thomas Pomeray married Joan Chudleigh, daughter of Joan Merton, by her 2nd husband, Sir James Chudleigh, who then became wife of Sir John Pomeroy. 
1389: Thomas Pomeray,  Serving under the  Earl of Arundel, Richard Fitz Alans command: At Brest Garrison. 1 year. 

1390: 26/06: London: Pardon of outlawry to Thomas Pomeray [of Berry Pomeroy] for non-appearance to answer Simon Doser and Henry Pountfreyt, citizens and saddlers of London, for a debt of 20 marks. [CPR 1388-92, 280]

1391: Thomas and Joan de la Pomeray obtained license to hear mass in any oratories upon their estates within the diocese. 

1392: Feb 13th: Thomas de la Pomeray, Esquire: under command of Earl of Huntington, John Holand: 1 year at Brest Castle and Town. As an esquire, Thomas would bring with him three Archers. 

1395, Feb 10: Thomad de la Pomeray, Esquire, under Duke of Lancaster, John of Gaunt, 1 year, Acquitaine

1396:  Feb 10th: Thomas de la Pomeray, Esquire: “Man At Arms,” under Duke of Lancaster, John of Gaunt: 1 Year Gascony

1395, July: Powley P 64:”Because he had tarried on his affairs, Thomas incurred a revocation of an almost six months’ old protection for a year to travel to Acquitaine with the King’s uncle, John, duke of Lancaster. 

1397: received a pardon for sums owed certain citizens of London, a draper, tailor and armourer. 

King Henry IV acceded in September 1399. He was the son of John of Gaunt, with whom Thomas de la Pomeray had served for the past five years. 

Badge of John of Gaunt

1400, Feb 22: Thomas de la Pomerai was allocated the manor of Oakford, late of John of Salisbury, deceased, from the time of forfeiture by the said John,  for 8 years. 

1400: March:  Made the King’s esquire;  and by December of that year was The King’s Knight. (Powley, page 64..says the King had knighted him at his last voyage to Scotland. He was given a grant for life of William Hasthorpe’s land in Hemyock. Thomas de la Pomerai gave good service in Scotland and Wales between 1400 and 1402. 

1400: 24 Nov: Receive the shrievalty of Devonshire. He fell into arrears and was jailed. 
1402: Jan 18: Calendar of Close Rolls  Henry IV, volume 1. Westminster: To the sheriff of Devon for the time being. Order to pay to Thomas Pomeroy, the king’s knight 10/. a year for life and the arrears since 22 Mar Henry IV, on which date for good service the king granted him for life, by name of Thomas Pomeroy, esquire, 20/a. a year of the issues and profits of that county.

1402 March 4.
Westminster. To the warden of the Flete prison. Order to set free Thomas Pomeray the king's knight, late sheriff of Devon, imprisoned by reason of 56l. 13s. 4d. arears in his account before the treasurer and the barons of the exchequer; as the king has pardoned him that sum, discharging and acquitting him thereof. By bill of the treasurer.
1402, October: de la Pomerai received pardon for Outlawry, for not appearing before the bench in Richard II’s reign to answer Giles Mallory, chivaler. 
  
        
Henry IV                      
 
1402 Nov. 4..: Memorandum of a mainprise under a pain of 100l., made in chancery 29 November this year by John Arundell, John Herle knights of Cornwall, William Esturmy knight of Wilteshir and Robert Cary of Devon for Philip Courtenay knight, and of an undertaking by him under a pain of 1,000l,  that he shall do or procure no hurt or harm to the abbot of Newenham, the monks his fellows, their men or servants, to Thomas de la Pomeray, his wife, their men or servants, or to any of the king's lieges.

1404: Thomas de la Pomeray is a member of Parliament for Devonshire. Also Sheriff of Somerset and Dorsetshire. 
1405: On a commission of array in Wales to defend against the French. 
1406: Pardon for not appearing Jan 1406, to answer to debt to a London citizen draper, and another in February for default to John Nowlers, knight, of the county of Oxfordshire. 
1406: Member of Parliament. 
1408: Nov. 11.  Westminster: Thomas Pomeray knight, William Pomeray and John Lopynforde to Henry Lescrope lord of Masham. Recognisance for 50l., to be levied etc. in Devon.

409: Nov. 8.: Westminster. The King requested that Parliament send the following order: "To John Courtenay knight. Order for particular causes, under a pain of 100l., to leave all else and, ceasing every excuse, to be in person before the king and council in the next parliament on the fifth day after the opening thereof, in order to answer touching what shall be laid against him on behalf of Thomas Pomeray, knight and Joan his wife. By the King."

Powley, page 65 gives a brief account of what prompted this order.
    “Thomas and Joan were, they alleged, seised of the manors of Clyfton (Cliston? Broad Clyst), Ayston (Ashton?) Shappelhelion and Hokesbeare, Asselond (Affelond? Now Affaland in Clawton) and other tenements in Exeter and Devonshire, and the manor Westwy Demouth (Widemouth, Poundstock?) in Cornwall; but Philip Courtenay, and John, his son, and Joan, wife of James Chuddleigh, wrongfully evicted the petitioners and seized the evidences of their possession.”  Courtenay hardly gave “sufficient response” to the charges; and it was decided Thomas and Joan could either return to their manors, if the law allowed, or the case go to a general assize, in Devonshire. “

The Parliament Rolls of Medeival England: 30 Sep – 25 November: (C65/65)

What is not stated in Powley is that Joan “wife of James Chudleigh,”   was actually his 2nd wife, and a widow. She was Joan Chudleigh, nee Champernoun, daughter of Alexander Champernoun, and engaged to John Courtenay: 

 “Sir Thomas Pomeroy and his wife, alleged various depradations committed by Sir Philip Courtenay in Devon. Courtenay, the fifth son of Hugh earl of Devon (d. 1377), was a man whose 'predilection for violence and thuggery was extreme even by medieval standards'.  Yet, notwithstanding his notoriety, there was no precedent for the lords to take upon themselves the task of dealing directly with a man who was not a peer simply on the basis of a complaint sent up to them by the commons. Nevertheless they proceeded to do so: he was duly brought into parliament and interrogated, and when his answers were found to be unsatisfactory he was ordered to be imprisoned at the king's mercy.

Courtenay did not remain long in prison, however - partly no doubt because of his status, and partly because his military ability was too valuable to the crown. On Saturday 25 November - the last day of the parliament - once the commons had made their grant of one tenth and fifteenth and had renewed the wool subsidy and tunnage and poundage until Michaelmas 1405, the lords spiritual and temporal promptly requested that he (Courtenay) be released from prison, to which the king acceded, provided that Courtenay appear before him the following day. Then, once the commons' petitions had been read and answered, the earl of Northumberland extended an invitation to all the members to dine with the king the next day, and the parliament was concluded.” (Parliament Rolls)

1410: Knight of the shire of Devonshire: attended Westminster; Sheriff of Devonshire. 


Sir Thomas Pomeroy of Combe Releigh

1412: Held in Alstone in Hornspulle manor of Anne, widow of Fulco, son of Fulco fitz-Warryn, wife of William de Clynton, baron. 

1413: Feb. 26.   Westminster. To the treasurer and the barons of the exchequer. Writ of supersedeas in respect of their demand upon Thomas Pomeray knight, to account or answer for the body of John Hauley of Dertemouth, or for his lands, goods and chattels, and order to discharge him; as the king appointed the said Thomas, being then sheriff of Devon, to attach John Hauley and seize his lands, goods etc. into the king's hand, but he has made oath in chancery that that commission came never to his hands.

1413: King Henry V became king: (http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/henry5.htm)
Thomas de la Pomerai presented the letters patent of March and December 1400 for inspection and confirmation.  Knight of the Shire for Devonshire in the Westminster Parliament of May 1413. Also sheriff. 

1413: Served as witness when John Crede quit-claimed to Edward de Courtenay and others in respect of lands in Chilton Furnyaux, Woodland, etc.




1414: Nov. 10. Westminster. To the escheator in Devon. Order to give William de Clynton knight and Anne his wife, late the wife of Fulk Fitz Warynson and heir of Fulk Fitz Waryn knight who died within age in ward of the king, livery of such as are in his bailiwick of the knights' fees and parts of fees following, which the king has assigned to them in dower: Namely (long list) : in Wiltesir, the moiety of one knight's fee in Alledeston held by Thomas Pomeray knight of the manor of Honspulle at 50s.,  etc…


        
Illustration by Annie Pomeroy

1415: February: Excused for great costs and losses due to the Exchequer. 



1416: Sir John de la Pomeray of Berry Pomeroy, died. 

1417: Dec. 17. Memorandum of a mainprise under a pain of 40l., made in chancery 20 December this year by Robert Cary, John Cole, William Pomeray esquires and William Jeu , all of Devon, for Thomas Pomeray knight, and of an undertaking by him under a pain of 100l., that he shall do or procure no hurt or harm to Edward Pomeray esquire or any of the people.

1417 Dec 21: Memorandum of a (like) mainprise, made 21 December by John Arundell of Trerys co. Cornwall esquire, William Kent of London 'peutrer,' Thomas Trefridowe of Cornwall and John Neucombe of Devon for Edward Pomeray esquire, and of a (like) undertaking by him, in regard to Thomas Pomeray knight etc.

1418: Edward Pomeroy and his wife Margaret had been rightfully seised of the manor of Tregony for 14 years, by virtue of a fine levied to them and their heirs male by John de la Pomeray, knight, now of late, since the beginning of the King’s present expedition, Thomas Pomeroy and other’s have forcibly entered the manor, imprisoned Margaret there for two days, ousted her and her servants therefrom, and occupied the manor and done damage there. The petitioners therefore pray that, since they cannot during the said expedition be helped by the common law, the guardian (duke of Bedford, guardian of England) will summon Thomas to appear before him at the quinzaine of Trinity next, and also grant a writ to the sheriff of Devon to make public proclamation of the said summons. 

Endorsed: On 5 July Henry V (1419) it was agreed by Council that Thomas should be summoned to appear before them in the quinzaine of Michaelmas next. (Powley, page 68). 

1420: Joan, widow of Sir John de la Pomeray, without licence of the King, made over her rights in Beri to Thomas and his wife Joan and to John Cole. She died on Corpus Christi day.   

(Left: An interesting coat of arms Pomeroy impaling Chudleigh, window glass in the church at Ashton)

B
Berry Pomeroy 
1422: July 20.
Westminster. To the escheator in Devon. Order to take the fealties of Thomas de la Pomeray and John Cole, and to give the said Thomas, Joan his wife and John Cole livery of the manor of Byry Pomeray, and the issues thereof taken since 20 November last; as it is found by inquisition, taken before the escheator, that John Pomeray knight was thereof seised, that he held it of King Richard II in chief by knight service. , that by name of John de la Pomeray, son and heir of Henry de la Pomeray, he gave the same to William de Horbury parson of Ipplepen, Richard Holrygge vicar of Bryxham, John Papilwyke parson of Lookessore, Reynold vicar of Byry Pomeray, John Hill, John Wadham, Thomas de la Pomeray, William Caunton and Richard Aysshe and to their heirs, that by virtue of his gift they were thereof seised, that William Caunton died, that after his death the surviving feoffees gave the manor to the said John Pomeray and Joan then his wife and to the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the right heirs of John Pomeray, that licence of the late king was obtained, that those grantees continued their estate during the said John's life, that he died thereof jointly seised without issue by the said Joan, that she overlived him, and peaceably continued her estate until Ascension day 8 Henry V, on which day without licence of the king, by name of Joan who was wife of John de la Pomeray son and heir of Henry de la Pomeray, by deed of that date she made a surrender and grant of her estate in the said manor to the said Thomas, Joan and John Cole, being the right heirs of John Pomeray, and to their heirs, Joan being daughter of Joan sister and one of his sisters and heirs, and John Cole being son of Margaret the other sister and heir, by virtue of which surrender and grant they are thereof seised; and on 20 November last for a fine paid in the hanaper the king pardoned the trespasses herein committed, and for 20s. there paid he has respited the homage of John Cole until Easter next. (fn. 6)

1422:  Nov. 18.
Westminster. To the escheator in Devon. Order to give John Cole esquire, Thomas Pomeray knight and Joan his wife seisin of the dower of Joan who was wife of John Pomeray knight; as upon the finding of an inquisition, ..that at his death John Pomeray held the manor of Stokkelegh Pomeray and moieties of the manors of Hurberton and Brixham in chief by knight service, and that the said Joan wife of Thomas, being daughter of Joan one of his sisters, and John Cole, being son of Margaret his other sister, are his cousins and next heirs, and of full age, the king respited the homage and fealty of John Cole for his purparty of the said manor and moieties until a day now past, and ordered the then escheator to take the fealty of the said Thomas, to take of John Cole and Thomas security for payment of their relief at the exchequer, in their presence…of their attorneys to make a partition of the premises into two equal parts, to give John Cole, Thomas and Joan his wife seisin of their respective purparties, saving the dower of the said Joan wife of John to be by that king assigned, and to send that partition under seal to be enrolled in chancery; and by another inquisition, taken before John Jaybyn the late king's escheator, it is found that Joan wife of John at her death held no lands in Devon of that king nor of any other in demesne nor in service, and that she died on Thursday the feast of Corpus Christi 8 Henry V.

1422. December: St Peters, Rome: Portable Alter allowed  in home of John Cole, and Margery his wife, noblewoman.


1422: Joan Chudley Pomeroy died after 18 Nov, 1422. 
1422: December: Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series I, Henry... C 139/40/51 Pomeray, Joan,  who was the wife of Thomas, kt:  Devon . 

(The Inquisition Post Mortem wasn't published until  the death of Sir Thomas Pomeroy, her husband, in 1428).
1428: Next heirs of Joan Pomeroy were Joan St Aubyn and John St Aubyn

Her husband Thomas Pomeroy held until his death in 1428; and his heirs were Joan wife of Otes Dobrugan and Margaret, wife of Reynold Tretherfe, daughters of John St Aubyn, son of Joan, wife of Thomas by her first husband St Aubyn. 

Joan possessed at death Combe Ralegh, Avishayes in Sidmouth, and Wolston, in east Alvington; a half share in Beri, half share in Stoklegh, a half share in Tregony.  and half shares in the moieties of Hurberton and Brixham.


1422: Sir Thomas Pomeroy married 2nd Joan Ralegh Whalesborough 

1423.  March.  St. Peter's, Rome.  Thomas Pomeray, knight, of the same diocese, and Joan his wife, noblewoman.  
They had gone on Pilgrimage to Rome in celebration of  the 1423 Jubilee.

1423: Dec. 4.
Westminster. To the treasurer and the barons of the exchequer. Order not to trouble John Cole esquire for his homage; as upon the finding of an inquisition, taken before William Cheyne and John Martyn by virtue of a commission of the late king to them and to William Pawlet and John Sparowe addressed, that John Pomeray knight at his death held the manor of Stokkeleghe Pomeray and moieties of the manors of Huberton and Brixham co. Devon in chief by knight service, and that Joan wife of Thomas Pomeray knight, daughter of Joan one of his sisters, and John Cole esquire son of Margaret his other sister are his cousins and next heirs and of full age, for a fine paid in the hanaper the late king respited the homage and fealty of John Cole until a day now past, and on 1 May 5 Henry V commanded livery to be given him of his purparty; and upon the finding of another inquisition, taken before the late king's escheator, that John Pomeray was seised of the manor of Byry Pomeray, holding the same of King Richard II in chief by knight service, and by name of John de la Pomeray son and heir of Henry de la Pomeray gave the same to William de Horbury parson of Ipplepen, Richard Holrygge vicar of Brixham, John Papylwyke parson of Lookessore, Reynold vicar of Biry Pomeray, John Hille, John Wadham, Thomas de la Pomeray, William Caunton and Richard Aysshe and to their heirs, that those feoffees were thereof seised, that William Caunton after died, that the survivors with licence of the king gave the said manor to the said John Pomeray and Joan then his wife and to the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the right heirs of John Pomeray, that John Pomeray and Joan were thereof seised by the form of that gift, and continued their estate all the life of John Pomeray, that he died seised jointly with her without issue by her, that she overlived him, and continued her estate until Ascension day 8 Henry V, on which date without licence of the king she made a surrender of the said manor, and grant of her estate therein, to Thomas de la Pomeray, Joan his wife and John Cole, being the right heirs of John Pomeray (as aforesaid), and to their heirs, and that by virtue of her surrender they were thereof seised; and for a fine paid in the hanaper on 20 November 8 Henry V the late king pardoned the trespasses herein committed, and on 20 July following for a fine therein paid respited the homage of John Cole until a day now past, and commanded livery to be given him of the said manor; and the king has taken his homage. By p.s. [986.]

1426: A trespass of Thomas against Edward is on record. 

1428: October: Sir Thomas de la Pomeray  died. John Cole's claim's had been "extinguished. "

1428: Dec 1: The lands of Beri, Stoklegh, Tregony and parts of Hurberton and Brixham were committed to four persons to be kept for Joan, wife of Otes Bodrugan and Margaret, wife of Reynold Tretherf, daughters of John St Aubyn, son of Joan, wife of Thomas (by her first husband Sir John st Aubyn), during their minority. 

Powley states: pg 75:
1428: “Edward Pomeray, son of Thomas, fifth son of Henry, had undisputed claim to headship of the house after 1428 and the death of Thomas de la Pomerai his cadet rival; but how exactly the estates came to re-collection in the hands of Edward is not at present plain. There is nothing to show that the married minors, for whom the Crown held, after the death of Thomas ever received the property.” 



1435. * Joan Pomerey. To be buried at the Friars Minors, "secundum disposicionem Gardiani ibidem et magistri Thome Wynchelsey." Bequeathed 40s. to the Friars to pray for his soul. Mentions Thomas Whalesburgh, her son, who was heir of her first husband John Whalesburgh, her son Robert Whalesburgh, and her second husband Sir Thomas Pomerey.

Illustration of helmets by
Annie Pomeroy

Will dated 20 Nov., 1435. Proved 18 Jan., 1435–6. 19 Luffenam.
Her tomb is not recorded in the Register; but it was in the sixth bay of the Choir in S. Francis' Chapel where her daughters Anne Molens and Alice FitzRauff were buried. Elizabeth Hamden, who was buried in the Nave, was possibly a granddaughter.  Greyfriars, page 97. 
                                                                                                                     



St Francis of Assisi: The Order of Penitents


William Pomeroy, close friend and companion of Sir Thomas Pomeroy:
Called "The Queen's Esquire" 1417.  Queen Joan of Navarre, the Queen Mother. 

That same William Pomeroy was "Presented in 1421 letters patent, dated 1416 of the Kings mother Joan, queen of England, granting for life to her esquire, 20 mris anually, from yearly gate of Oxford." 


In 1441, reference to William Pomeroy, “now deceased.”  Of Devonshire.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 26 January.
Joan Bithewater to Thomas Bithewater chaplain, Master John Stokes clerk of the chancery, William Norton esquire and Robert Forster 'gentilman,' both of Westminster co. Middlesex, their heirs and assigns. Gift during her life of a yearly rent of 10l. 13s. 4d., reciting a writing, dated Meynbury (Membury)  20 March 9 Henry VI, whereby Lawrence late prior of Goldeclyve and the convent gave to her and William Pomerey now deceased the manor of Meynbury otherwise Membury co. Devon for their lives and the life of the longest liver, a writing indented, dated Meynbury 24 March 9 Henry VI, whereby the said Joan and William made a grant of their whole estate in the said manor to the prior and convent and to their successors, subject to a yearly rent of 10l. 13s. 4d. payable to them for their lives and the life of the longest liver, the death of the said William, and that she is sole surviving. Witnesses: Richard Walsshe 'gentilman,' John Savage, Simon Croulonde, Robert Hough, John Faw . . . Dated Monday after Midsummer 18 Henry VI.






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