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2011 events


Saturday, 2011 June 25, Fremont Peak Star B Q — 9:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Location: Fremont Peak Observatory, 6878 San Juan County Road, San Juan Bautista, CA 95045 (Get Directions)

Anyone interested in astronomy or Fremont Peak State Park is welcome. You do not have to be a member of a club to attend. FREE! Potluck. Please pay $6 CA State Park parking fee in the main parking area. Overflow parking in Doe Flat. RSVP: Call (831) 623-2465 or e-mail and leave your name and number of guests. RSVP by June 20 so we can purchase enough food for everyone. KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Jeffrey Van Cleve, Photometer Characterization Scientist and SO Support Scientist, NASA Ames Research Center, The presentation will be about the Kepler Mission, Past, Present & Future. Kepler is a specialized orbiting observatory staring at a region of space looking for variations in the brightness of over 100,000 stars - a method of detecting extra-solar planets


2011 Jun 29. A public talk by Andrew Fraknoi
The Top Tourist Sights of the Solar System:
Where Bill Gates’ Great-Granddaughter Might Go on Her Honeymoon
Time: 1pm-2pm
Place: The Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley
Admission to The Lawrence Hall of Science is
$12.00 Adults (ages 19–61), $9.00 Student/Senior/Disabled (ages 7–18; 62 plus),
$6.00 Children (ages 3-6; children under 3 are admitted free), Free for Members

Astronomer and popular lecturer Andrew Fraknoi will explore the most intriguing future tourist destinations among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood, including the 4,000 mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), and the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system).


Andrew Fraknoi is the Chair of the Astronomy Department at Foothill College and the former Executive Director of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.  He was selected as the 2007 California Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Endowment. For more about Andrew Fraknoi, see
http://www.foothill.fhda.edu/ast/afraknoi.htm and
http://www.seti.org/page.aspx?pid=486



 Date: 2011 June 30. A free public seminar: Are We Alone?

See and hear from three pivotal planet-hunters of the NASA Kepler Mission to find planets around Sun-like stars---especially Earth-size planets that could be inhabited.

Time: 7:00-9:30 pm
Place: Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley

Once you realize that every star is a whole sun unto itself, the question naturally arises: "Do stars have planets that could be homes to more or less intelligent beings like ourselves?"  It has been only in the last 15 years that we even knew for sure that other stars had planets and now it's the NASA Kepler mission that is unfolding riches of data that now allow us to begin cataloging planets orbiting stars other than the Sun and take some of the very first steps to answer that question, "Are we alone?"  This seminar features a panel of key investigators in the NASA Kepler Mission Science Team who will share their insights, inspirations, late-breaking findings, and hints about what new discoveries we might be hearing from the mission in the future.

Astronomers have cracked the Milky Way like a piñata, and planets are now pouring out so fast that they do not know what to do with them all.
Dennis Overbye, NewYorkTimes, Feb 2, 2011

Panelists:
• Bill Borucki, Principal Investigator,
   NASA Kepler Mission, Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA
• Natalie Batalha,
   Co-Investigator and Deputy Science Team Lead for the NASA Kepler Mission,
   Professor of Physics and Astronomy at San Jose State University, and
   lead author of the published article about the discovery of the
   first nearly Earth-size rocky planet.
• Gibor Basri, Co-Investigator for NASA Kepler Mission and
   professor in the Department of Astronomy at University of California, Berkeley
• Moderator: Andrew Fraknoi, Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and
   Chair of Astronomy Department at Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, CA
 
William Borucki, Kepler PI

Natalie Batalha, Kepler Co-I


Gibor Basri, Kepler Co-I



Monday, 10/17/11
04:15 PM - 05:45 PM

UC Berkeley
LeConte Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Picture of Elemetary Particle Physics at Year Two of the Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN collides protons with unprecendeted high energy and intensity. Dedicated detectors, named ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, measure these collisions and attempt to reconstruct the stable, unstable and elusive particles that were produced therein. Most of the observed reactions can be described with particles and forces that are part of the well known Standard Model of particle physics. The goal of the LHC physics programme is to understand how the elementary particles can have mass (for example via the, so-called, Higgs mechanism), and to give insight into how the particles and forces behave when the energy is risen beyond everything every studied in the laboratory, energies as they occurred in the earliest moments of our universe. The Standard Model becoming unstable at these high energies, strong theoretical arguments favour the appearance of new phenomena. Astrophysical observations corroborate this perception. The colloquium will provide a journey through the most salient results obtained at the LHC and their impact on our understanding of particle physics.
Speaker: Andreas Hoecker, Physicist, CHIPP/CERN
Room 1
Monday, 10/17/11
04:15 PM - 05:45 PM

Cost:
Free
==================================

Monday, 10/17/11
Starts at 07:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Benjamin Dean Lecture: Tiny But Powerful: The Smallest Supermassive Black Holes
Supermassive black holes, with masses of millions to billions of times that of our own Sun, are found lurking at the centers of most nearby large galaxies. But which came first, the black hole or the galaxy? Dr. Greene will talk about the search for the smallest supermassive black holes today, and what they teach us about the first black holes.
Speaker: Dr. Jenny Greene, Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University
Monday, 10/17/11
Starts at 07:30 PM

Cost:
$12 General, $6 Members

===================================

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - 12:00pm

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

The oxygen isotopic composition of the Sun: implications for solar nebula chemistry
Kevin McKeegan
UCLA
We have measured the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind, captured and returned to Earth by NASA's Genesis mission. The data demonstrate that the Earth, Moon, Mars, and bulk meteorites are depleted in 16O by ~7% relative to the bulk solar system in a non-mass-dependent manner. Gas phase photochemistry, occurring either in the solar nebula or in its progenitor molecular cloud, is most likely responsible for changing the isotopic composition of planetary materials in the inner solar system prior to planetesimal accretion. Understanding how, when, and where the rocky planets acquired an isotopic composition distinct from the average composition of the dust and gas from which the solar system formed is a major challenge for the science of planetary origins.

==================================

Wed. October 19, 2011 at 7:00pm    SFAA mtg.

Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Subject:    CATCHING SHADOWS: KEPLER‚S QUEST FOR NEW WORLDS
Speaker:    Dr. Natalie Batalha
Abstract:    University Dr. Batalha has been affiliated with NASA Ames Research Center since 2000 where she conducts research on extrasolar planet detection and stellar astrophysics. She is a co-Investigator for NASA's Kepler Mission whose objective is to identify and characterize habitable, earth-like planets orbiting sun-like stars. As Director of the Systems Teaching Institute at the NASA Research Park (
http://uarc.ucsc.edu/sti
), Dr. Batalha is responsible for creating programs and resources for students pursuing careers in fields relevant to the mission of NASA Ames Research Center.
Speaker Bio:    Dr. Natalie Batalha ˆ Assistant Professor, Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University

==================================

Friday, 10/21/11
Starts at 07:30 PM

Milagra Ridge
600 Sharp Park Road
Pacifica, CA 94044

Astronomy in the Park
Join Suzanne Gurton, the Education Manager at the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Price Sheppy from Park Stewardship as we enjoy our night time National Park. We will be exploring the stars above through education, activities, and star gazing opportunities. This will be a great experience for all ages.
Where did we come from and where are we going? Come star gaze with us during the Orionid meteor shower and hear about the fate of the universe. Learn about the rocks under our feet and then stare out into the night sky beyond our galaxy to our neighboring Andromeda galaxy.
RSVP required for all events. Bad weather will cancel events. You will be notified by email if the event is cancelled because of bad weather.
For all events please bring:
     Warm Clothes
     Blankets to lay on and snuggle up in
     Binoculars for looking at the moon and stars
     A flashlight
Register at website below
Friday, 10/21/11
Starts at 07:30 PM

http://www.parksconservancy.org/visit/park-sites/milagra-ridge.html

Cost:
Free

===================================

Friday, 10/21/11
Starts at 08:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

My Einstein: Personal Memories of Albert Einstein
Join us for an intimate conversation with Stephanie Asker, family friend of Albert Einstein. She will share her personal stories, photos and home movies from her childhood - including how the Center came to own one of Einstein's personal telescopes. Explore our Center and engage in fun Einstein-esque activties.

Speaker: Stephanie Asker

Cost:
Free with admission

====================================

Fri. 10/21 7PM The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914

==================================

Fri. 10/21 and Sat. 10/22

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

==================================

Fri. 10/21 and Sat. 10/22

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.

==================================

Fri. 10/21 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

==================================
Sat. 10/22    10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

==================================

Sat. 10/22 San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Star Parties At Crestview Park, San Carlos

Sunset:  6:14 pm

Star Parties At Crestview Park
Come out and bring the kids for a mind expanding look at the universe

The City of San Carlos Parks and Recreation Department and the San
Mateo County Astronomical Society has open Star Parties twice a
month. These events are held in Crestview Park, San Carlos California.

Note that inclement weather
(clouds, excessive wind and showers) will cause the event to be
canceled without notice.

For more information call Bob Black, (650)592-2166, or send an email
to SMCAS@live.com or call Ed Pieret at (650)862-9602.

Reasons to Attend
If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a
real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.
If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a
telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.
If you think you might have an interest in astronomy come and talk to
experienced amateur astronomers.

Cautions
Dress warmly and wear a hat.
Visitors should park on the street and walk into the park so your
headlights don't affect the observer's dark adaptation.
Only park in the parking lot if you are arriving before dark and plan
to stay until the end of the event.
You shouldn't need lights but if you feel you do, only bring a small
flashlight with the lens covered using red cellophane or red balloon.
Please respect the telescopes and ask permission from the owner if
you wish to touch.
Parents, please watch your children.
The park is residential, and adjacent to homes and backyards, please
keep noise to a minimum.
Schedule
Time

Astronomers arrive to set up at around sunset. Observing starts at
about one hour after sunset and continues for two to three hours.

==================================

Monday, 10/24/11
05:00 PM - 06:00 PM

UC Berkeley
Bechtel Engineering Center
Berkeley, CA 94720

What makes up the dark matter of our universe
Through cosmology and particle physics we can view our understanding of how our universe came into existence. Of particular interest is what makes up dark matter. CDMS experiments search directly for dark matter particles passing through the laboratory. GLAST/Fermi look for gamma rays from dark matter particle-antiparticle annihilations, and the LHC at CERN may soon provide direct evidence for the structure of particle physics in dark matter. We will then tour the current range of experiments in direct detection, indirect detection, and accelerator experiments.

Speaker: Blas Cabrera, Professor of Physics, Stanford University

Cost:
Free

==================================
==================================

Fri. 10/28 and Sat. 10/29

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

==================================

Fri. 10/28 and Sat. 10/29

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.

==================================

Fri. 10/28 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

==================================
Sat. 10/29    10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

==================================

Fri. -Tues. October 28-Nov. 1-Antique Telescope Society meeting/Tour of Kitt Peak National Observatory in AZ

These are great tours where one gets to see the inner workings of great professional and public astronomical observatories as well as hear neat lectures. This one will be nearby in AZ. Highly recommended! Check out their web site.

http://www.webari.com/oldscope/

On October 28 through Nov. 1, 2011, the Antique Telescope Society will hold its 20th Annual Convention in Tucson, AZ, with optional tours planned for the two following days. One of the highlights will occur on Saturday, October 29, when we will take a VIP tour of Kitt Peak during the day and have optional observing on Kitt Peak during the evening. In addition, the program includes a reception on Friday evening and a banquet on Sunday which will feature a keynote address. The Convention will also have talks and exhibits. A tour of Steward Mirror Laboratory is planned for Friday, a tour of the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins will be held on Monday, and a tour of Mount Graham International Observatory and its Large Binocular Telescope is planned for Tuesday. While in Tucson, the Four Points Sheraton Hotel University Plaza will serve as our headquarters. We look forward to welcoming ATS members and friends to Tucson. Please join us.
Ken Launie, Convention Co-Chairman and President Peter Abrahams, Convention Co-Chairman and Paper Sessions Chairman Jack Koester, Treasurer Walter H. Breyer, Executive Secretary

============================

Sat. 10/29 San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Star Parties At Crestview Park, San Carlos

Sunset:  6:16 pm

Star Parties At Crestview Park
Come out and bring the kids for a mind expanding look at the universe

The City of San Carlos Parks and Recreation Department and the San
Mateo County Astronomical Society has open Star Parties twice a
month. These events are held in Crestview Park, San Carlos California.

Note that inclement weather
(clouds, excessive wind and showers) will cause the event to be
canceled without notice.

For more information call Bob Black, (650)592-2166, or send an email
to SMCAS@live.com or call Ed Pieret at (650)862-9602.

Reasons to Attend
If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a
real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.
If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a
telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.
If you think you might have an interest in astronomy come and talk to
experienced amateur astronomers.

Cautions
Dress warmly and wear a hat.
Visitors should park on the street and walk into the park so your
headlights don't affect the observer's dark adaptation.
Only park in the parking lot if you are arriving before dark and plan
to stay until the end of the event.
You shouldn't need lights but if you feel you do, only bring a small
flashlight with the lens covered using red cellophane or red balloon.
Please respect the telescopes and ask permission from the owner if
you wish to touch.
Parents, please watch your children.
The park is residential, and adjacent to homes and backyards, please
keep noise to a minimum.
Schedule
Time

Astronomers arrive to set up at around sunset. Observing starts at
about one hour after sunset and continues for two to three hours.

============================

Monday, 10/31/11
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

UC Berkeley
LeConte Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720

A Sharper Image: Adaptive Optics and Laser Guide Stars for Astronomy
Adaptive optics is a technology that can remove the blurring effects of turbulence in the earth's atmosphere, so that telescopes on the ground can "see" as clearly as if they were in space. I will describe the basic principles of adaptive optics, and illustrate why lasers are needed to increase the fraction of the sky where one can apply adaptive optics corrections. As one example of astronomical observations which have benefitted strongly from adaptive optics correction. I will describe our recent detections of dual supermassive black holes in colliding galaxies. I will conclude with a look forward to the adaptive optics systems of the future.
Speaker: Claire Max, Professor, Astronomy & Physics, UC Santa Cruz; Director of the Center for Adaptive Optics
Room 1
Monday, 10/31/11
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

Cost:
Free
============================

Fri. -Tues. October 28-Nov. 1-Antique Telescope Society meeting/Tour of Kitt Peak National Observatory in AZ

These are great tours where one gets to see the inner workings of great professional and public astronomical observatories as well as hear neat lectures. This one will be nearby in AZ. Highly recommended! Check out their web site.

http://www.webari.com/oldscope/

On October 28 through Nov. 1, 2011, the Antique Telescope Society will hold its 20th Annual Convention in Tucson, AZ, with optional tours planned for the two following days. One of the highlights will occur on Saturday, October 29, when we will take a VIP tour of Kitt Peak during the day and have optional observing on Kitt Peak during the evening. In addition, the program includes a reception on Friday evening and a banquet on Sunday which will feature a keynote address. The Convention will also have talks and exhibits. A tour of Steward Mirror Laboratory is planned for Friday, a tour of the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins will be held on Monday, and a tour of Mount Graham International Observatory and its Large Binocular Telescope is planned for Tuesday. While in Tucson, the Four Points Sheraton Hotel University Plaza will serve as our headquarters. We look forward to welcoming ATS members and friends to Tucson. Please join us.
Ken Launie, Convention Co-Chairman and President Peter Abrahams, Convention Co-Chairman and Paper Sessions Chairman Jack Koester, Treasurer Walter H. Breyer, Executive Secretary

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015
Time: 4:15 pm
Location: Panofsky Auditorium. Event is open to the public.

2011 Nobel Prize in Physics: Supernova, Cosmic Acceleration and the Fate of the Universe
Date: 10/31/2011
Roger Blandford
SLAC

Time: 4:15 pm
Location: Panofsky Auditorium. Event is open to the public.

The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Adam Reiss and Brian Schmidt for their discovery that the universe is accelerating. This realization, which was made by studying exploding stars called supernovae, may have vindicated a 93 year old proposal by Albert Einstein that space is permeated by a universal and eternal cosmological constant promising a bleak future of dilution and decay. The research which led to this surprising and challenging discovery will be described in simple terms and some of the ways that astronomers and physicists have been building upon it will be explained.


============================


Monday, 10/31/11
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM


UC Berkeley
LeConte Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720


A Sharper Image: Adaptive Optics and Laser Guide Stars for Astronomy
Adaptive optics is a technology that can remove the blurring effects of turbulence in the earth's atmosphere, so that telescopes on the ground can "see" as clearly as if they were in space. I will describe the basic principles of adaptive optics, and illustrate why lasers are needed to increase the fraction of the sky where one can apply adaptive optics corrections. As one example of astronomical observations which have benefitted strongly from adaptive optics correction. I will describe our recent detections of dual supermassive black holes in colliding galaxies. I will conclude with a look forward to the adaptive optics systems of the future.
Speaker: Claire Max, Professor, Astronomy & Physics, UC Santa Cruz; Director of the Center for Adaptive Optics
Room 1
Monday, 10/31/11
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM


Cost:
Free
============================


Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm


SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043


ET Math: How Different Could It Be?
John Stillwell
Professor of Mathematics, University of San Francisco
We like to think that intelligent aliens would have the same basic ideas about numbers and geometry as us, but, even if they do, they might express those ideas very differently. To illustrate what different forms a concept can take, I will show how differently the law ab=ba has been interpreted at different times in human mathematical culture. This seemingly basic law has several different origins -- in geometry, number theory, and set theory -- some of which seem alien even to experienced mathematicians.


=============================


Wed.11/02 6:00 PM - 11:00 PM


The Tech Museum of Innovation
201 South Market St
San Jose, CA 95113


The Tech Museum After Hours: Cosmos under the Cosmos


Sip on a glow-in-the-dark Cosmo as you enjoy the cosmic music stylings of the Physics Chanteuse. Learn about cosmic dynamics with hands-on activities by UCSC astrophysicists. Journey through the universe in the Holt Digital Starlab. Explore the museum under moody lighting, play space-themed video games on our giant IMAX screen, and lounge in our Cosmic Cabaret.Wednesday, 11/02/1106:00 PM - 11:00 PM


Cost:
Free
=============================


Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:00 PM - 09:00 PM


San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Ave
San Francisco, CA 94132


Contact (The Reel and the Real): Humanity's Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence


Join astronomer Jill Tarter, whose work and life was a key model for the character Jodie Foster plays in the film Contact,for a very special evening of science fiction and cutting-edge science. We will screen the full-length film about the discovery of intelligent life among the stars, and then hear Dr. Tarter discuss her ongoing work at the SETI Institute to find radio signals from alien civilizations. After her film and the talk, there will be time for questions from the audience.
Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:00 PM - 09:00 PM


Cost:
Free


=============================


Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM


San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin St
San Francisco, CA 94102


Packing for Mars


What happens when one of the funniest and smartest authors around gets interviewed by a MythBuster? Hear which space legends might be as combustible as urban ones when Mary Roach and Adam Savage chat it up about Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void, San Francisco's One City One Book selection for 2011.
Before the conversation, enjoy the premiere of Rockets of Yesterday, an eye-popping video tour of 1950s and 60s rocket dreams, curated by archivist and space enthusiast Megan Prelinger.
Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM


Cost:
Free


=============================


Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:30 PM - 08:30 PM


Redwood City Public Library
1044 Middlefield Rd
Redwood City, CA 94061


Can we make it to Mars? - a film introduced by Katie Berryhill
Can humans survive a trip to Mars that would take two to three years? Among the innovations covered in the film are meteoroid-proof materials, new space foods and spacesuits, and novel modes of transport. PBS; 53 minutes, 2011.
Katie Beryhill is assistant professor of space studies at American Public University System and a lecturer at San Francisco's Morrison Planetarium.
Wednesday, 11/02/11
06:30 PM - 08:30 PM


Cost:
Free


==============================


Wednesday, 11/02/11
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM


East Bay Science Cafe
Cafe Valparaiso, La Pena Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave
Berkeley, CA 94705


From the Death of the Dinosaurs to the Stardust in your Bones


Almost 14 billion years ago, the Big Bang created the seeds of our present-day Universe. Modern astronomers use telescopes and computers as time-machines, compressing millions of years of history into the blink of an eye to study the inexorable forces at work during that process. Material from space – the complex organic molecules necessary for life – has rained down upon our planet for billions of years. The history of life on Earth is unequivocally tied to the stars. Join Drs. Steve Croft and David Lindberg as they discuss the interconnection between astronomy and evolution in this informal forum for discussing interesting and relevant scientific issues.
Wednesday, 11/02/11
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM


Cost:
Free


===============================
Wednesday, 11/02/11
08:00 PM - 10:00 PM


Rooster T Feathers
157 W. El Camino Real
Sunnyvale, CA 94087


Spontaneous Emissions: An evening of science humor


Get your geek on! From the lighter side of helium to the darker side of the moon, join science comedian Brian Malow on a rocket ride through the humorverse. Brian will dispel myths & misconceptions about science, explore the science in science fiction films, and exercise your brain as well as your funny bone. Also, appearing: special guest Norm Goldblatt.
For all audiences! Music is not just for musicians. Art is not just for artists. And science is not just for scientists.
Brian Malow is Earth's Premier Science Comedian (available for off-world appearances if transportation is provided). Based in San Francisco, Brian has appeared on "The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson," and performed for NASA, JPL, NIST, OSA, ACS, and other acronyms. He also makes science videos for Time Magazine's website, and is a contributor to Neil de Grasse Tyson's radio show. Brian has been featured in the Washington Post, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and San Jose Mercury News.
Wednesday, 11/02/11
08:00 PM - 10:00 PM


Cost:
Free


===============================
Thursday, 11/03/11
11:30 AM - 01:00 PM


UCSF Parnassus Campus
505 Parnassus Ave
San Francisco, CA 94122


Experiments in Space


Biomedical research in space has yielded a wealth of insights into the effects of weightlessness on the human body and the effects of long space missions on the mind. As we mark the final U.S. space shuttle mission in July 2011, this panel reviews advances in space medicine over the last 60 years and reflects on what the future might hold.
Thursday, 11/03/11
11:30 AM - 01:00 PM


Cost:
Free with admission


===============================


Thursday, 11/03/11
12:00 PM - 01:00 PM


Silicon Valley Leaders Symposium
San Jose State University
Engineering Building
San Jose, CA 95192


Silicon Valley Leaders Symposium
Speaker: Dr. S. Pete Worden, NASA Ames
Thursday, 11/03/11
12:00 PM - 01:00 PM


Cost:
Free
===============================


Friday, November 4th, 2011 7:30PM social, 8PM mtg. San Mateo County Astronomical Society mtg.


College of San Mateo
1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA 94402
The CSM Planetarium Bldg 36, Parking Lot 5


SPEAKERS: Dr. Terry Fong


Director, Intelligent Robotics Group


NASA - Ames


TOPIC: Planetary Exploration Rebooted


New Ways of Exploring the Moon, Mars and Beyond






TIME: 8:00pm November 4th
WHERE: The CSM Planetarium Bldg 36, Parking Lot 5
. Free and open to the public


=============================


Friday, 11/04/11
06:30 PM - 10:00 PM


The Tech Museum of Innovation
201 South Market St
San Jose, CA 95113


Dinner and a Private Screening of 'Hubble' in IMAX with NASA Astronaut Megan McArthur
Astronaut McArthur shares her stories from Space Shuttle Atlantis and the last Hubble mission. Enjoy dinner and a private screening of our IMAX movie Hubble introduced by Astronaut McArthur. Afterward, join our Astronaut on the rooftop terrace under the stars for space-themed treats, Q & A, and photo opportunities
Tickets
Friday, 11/04/11
06:30 PM - 10:00 PM


Cost:
$39.99 Adult, $19.99 Children, discount for member


============================


Fri. 11/4 7PM The Telescope Makers’ Workshop


Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450


The Telescope Makers’ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914


============================
Fri. + Sat. 11/4-5


San Jose Astronomical Association star parties


0Next At Houge Park:
San Jose


Two Star Parties
On One Weekend!
SJAA star party Nov 4, 7-10PM
Bay Area Science Fair Nov 5, 7-10PM


============================
Saturday, 11/05/11
09:30 AM - 01:00 PM


The Tech Museum of Innovation
201 South Market St
San Jose, CA 95113


Teacher Open House with Astronaut Megan McArthur


Join us for an extraordinary morning with NASA Astronaut Megan McArthur! Astronaut McArthur will introduce a screening of the IMAX movie Hubble, followed by a Q&A session detailing her experiences with Hubble. Learn more about the space-related activities available for you in the museum, and in your classroom from NASA.
Reservations required at (408) 294-8324
Saturday, 11/05/11
09:30 AM - 01:00 PM


Cost:
Free


=============================


Fri. 11/4 and Sat. 11/5


Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300


EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/


Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open


==================================


Fri. 11/4 and Sat. 11/5


Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300


Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).


ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.


==================================


Fri. 11/4 9PM


Foothill Community College


12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills


Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.


On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.


The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.


Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!


Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.


==================================
Sat. 11/5 10AM


Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA


Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.


Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.


=============================


Sat. 11/5


College of San Mateo, Building 36
1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA 94402


Family Science and Astronomy Festival


In conjunction with Bay Area Science Festival, College of San Mateo and San Mateo County Astronomical Society presentFamily Science and Astronomy Festival Saturday, Nov. 5, 2:00 - 11:00 pm. Enjoy science and astronomy activities for the whole family. Events are free to the public. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5, and Beethoven Lot 2 by CSM Theatre.




Photos: John Fiske & Ed Pieret, SMCAS Keynote speaker Alex Filippenko Jazz Under The Stars


Schedule of events:
College of San Mateo, Building 36, 1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard, San Mateo, CA 94402
2:00 pm: Planetarium show
2:30 to 4:30 pm: Science demonstrations by CSM science faculty (Biology, Geology, and Physics)
4:30 to 6:30 pm: Astronomy demonstrations, hands-on workshops, and planetarium shows.


7:00 to 8:30 pm: Keynote speaker: Dr. Alex Filippenko, Professor of Astronomy, UC Berkeley
"Dark Energy and the Runaway Universe" CSM Theater (Building 3).
8:30 to 9:00 pm: Speaker reception in the Theater Lobby


9:15 to 11:00 pm: Telescope viewing of the night sky in our rooftop observatory. (Dress warmly!)


==========================


Sunday Nov. 6, 12:30PM


AT & T Park
San Francisco


Astronomer to Give Talk on What Happened to Pluto at AT&T Park During Science Festival Sunday, Nov. 6




Astronomer Andrew Fraknoi (Foothill College) will be one of the invited speakers/performers during the Family Science Discovery Day at AT&T Park, Sunday, Nov. 6th.


The all-day event is part of the first-ever Bay Area Science Festival (100 events about science in 10 days from Oct. 29 - Nov. 6, 2011).


Fraknoi will speak from the Main Stage above the dugout in the park at 12:30 pm on the topic:


"Whatever Happened to Pluto: Why It Got Kicked out of the Planet Club, and Why It Had It Coming!"


The entire day is free and open to the public. There will be many dozens of booths, activities, and exhibits on science throughout AT&T Park. (The Physics Chanteuse will also perform.)


The demotion of Pluto shocked the public and led to angry letters and even protests in some cities. But the story of how Pluto became a dwarf started back in the year 1800 when a Sicilian astronomer made a dramatic cosmic discovery. Popular lecturer and frequent radio guest Andrew Fraknoi will fill everyone in on the behind-the-scenes history of Pluto and what really led to its being kicked out of the planet club. He will also describe the newer „dwarf planets‰ Eris, Makemake, and Haumea, whose discovery contributed to Pluto‚s downfall.


Andrew Fraknoi is the Chair of the Astronomy Department at Foothill College and the former Executive Director of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He was selected as the 2007 California Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Endowment and recently won the national Gemant Prize for his work bringing the sciences into popular culture. You may have heard one of his regular appearances on Bay Area radio; he is a frequent guest on KGO and on the Forum program on KQED. He specializes in explaining astronomical ideas in everyday language. Asteroid 4859 has been named Asteroid Fraknoi to recognize his contributions to the public understanding of science (but he is quick to reassure everyone that it is a very boring asteroid, and not one that could hit the Earth.)


For more information about the Bay Area Science Festival, see: http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/


================================

Astronomy Programs for the Public are Featured in
the First Bay Area Science Festival

Science organizations throughout the Northern California area have joined to
produce the first-ever Bay Area Science Festival -- 100 science events for the
public in 10 days (from Oct. 29 through Nov. 6th.)
See: http://www.bayareascience.org for the amazingly full program.

Many astronomy organizations and individual astronomers are participating,
particularly during a Bay Area Star Party on Saturday evening, Nov. 5th. Here
are some highlights of astronomy during this Festival:

Oct 26. Alex Filippenko on "Dark Energy and the Runaway Universe"

Join award-winning Berkeley Professor Alex Filippenko as he explains the
discoveries that won the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. In this free talk, you
can learn about the evidence that shows the expansion of the universe is
speeding up and what scientists think might be behind it.

Wednesday, October 26th, 6:15-7:30 PM
Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Public Library, 100 Larkin St, San Francisco,
94102

For more, see:
http://www.bayareascience.org/10/26/dark-energy-and-the-runaway-universe/
________________________________________________

Nov 2. Jill Tarter on "Contact: The Reel and the Real"  Humanity‚s Search
for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence

A film and talk with Dr. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute
Wednesday evening, Nov. 2, at 6 - 9:30 pm

McKenna Theater at San Francisco State University,
Holloway Avenue and Tapia Drive, San Francisco, CA 94132
For a map and parking links, see: http://www.sfsu.edu/~sfsumap/

Seats for this free program are available on a first come, first served basis!

Join astronomer Jill Tarter, whose work and life was a key model for the character Jodie Foster plays in the film Contact, for a very special evening of science fiction and cutting-edge science. We will screen the full-length feature film about the discovery of intelligent life among the stars, and then hear Dr. Tarter discuss her ongoing work at the SETI Institute to find radio signals from alien civilizations. After her film and the talk, there will be time for questions from the audience.

For more information, see:
http://www.bayareascience.org/11/02/are-we-alone-a-special-screening-of-contact-\
with-jill-tarter/
________________________________________________

Nov 4. Seth Shostak on a panel on "Hollywood Science"

The SETI Institute's outreach scientist (and winner of the ASP's Klumpke-Roberts Prize for astronomy popularization), Seth Shostak, will be part of a panel of producers, directors, and science advisors for television and film, discussing how science fiction can be used (and misused) to educate the public about science ideas. Seth will be joined by "Battlestar Galactica" science advisor Kevin Grazier, SciFi Channel's Jamie Paglia, and Pixar Studio's Tony DeRose for a wide-ranging discussion. The free program, open to the public, will be held Friday, Nov. 4th from 5 to 7 pm in the Pier 39 Theater at the Aquarium of the Bay.

For more information, see:
http://www.bayareascience.org/11/04/science-hollywood/
________________________________________________
Nov 5. Bay Area Star Party, Saturday

On Saturday evening, Nov. 5th, over 20 science institutions with astronomy programs will join with amateur clubs who are AANC members to sponsor a Bay-Area-wide star party, with telescopes and astronomy-related family activities open free of charge to everyone from Santa Cruz to Marin Counties. This is a chance to bring friends, neighbors, and colleagues to take a look through a telescope (Jupiter will be nicely placed for viewing) and learn about the excitement of astronomy.

For more information about all the star party locations, see:
http://www.astrosociety.org/events/starparty.html

Many locations will be welcoming additional telescopes, so contact the local
organizers if you'd like to join in.
 
As part of the Bay Area Science Festival (Oct. 29 - Nov. 6), we are throwing a regional "star party" at over 20 different sites on Nov. 5.  Colleges, schools, observatories and science centers around the Bay Area will be open, and both professional and amateur astronomers will be on hand to offer telescope viewing and observing tips.  If the sky is cloudy, many sites will still offer indoor astronomy activities.  Some institutions will also have astronomy talks and events that evening, regardless of the weather.  The sites are listed below.  Please invite friends, colleagues, students, neighbors, and even your in-laws to join us for a stellar evening.

Other sites may be added. Check out the full details of what's happening at each site at: http://www.astrosociety.org/events/starparty.html

Participating Institutions:
 
California State University, East Bay (in Hayward)
Chabot College (in Hayward)
Chabot Space & Science Center (in Oakland)
The College of San Mateo (and the San Mateo Astronomical Society)
DeAnza College Planetarium (in Cupertino)
Deer Valley High School Planetarium (in Antioch)
Diablo Valley College (in Pleasant Hill)
Evergreen Valley College (in San Jose)
Foothill College and the Peninsula Astronomical Society (in Los Altos Hills)
Hartnell College Planetarium (in Salinas)
Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley
The Lick Observatory (on Mount Hamilton, San Jose)
Mount Diablo Astronomical Society (in Walnut Creek)
Mount Tamalpais State Park Programs, the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers and Wonderfest (on Mt. Tampalpais in Marin)
The National Lunar Science Institute & the SETI Institute (at Foothill College, see above)
Newark Junior High School
San Francisco State University
San Jose Astronomical Association
San Jose State University
Sonoma State University (in Rohnert Park)
University of California, Berkeley Space Sciences Lab & Astronomy Dept. (in San Leandro)
University of California, Santa Cruz Astronomy Department
 
For more on the full Festival, see: http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/

________________________________________________

Nov 6. Family Science Festival at AT&T Park, Sunday

On Sunday, Nov. 6th, AT&T Park in San Francisco will be open to the public from
11 am to 4 pm for "Discovery Day" -- a ballpark-sized family science fair, with
activities, exhibits, and entertainment. Many astronomical and space
organizations will have booths among the 170 that will be spread out on the
field and in the concession area.

Andrew Fraknoi (Foothill College & Astronomical Society of the Pacific) will be
one of the speakers/performers on the Main Stage above the dugout. Fraknoi will
speak at 12:30 pm on "Whatever Happened to Pluto: Why It Got Kicked out of the
Planet Club." At 2:45 pm, you can hear Lynda Williams, the talented "Physics
Chanteuse," perform some of her physics and astronomy cabaret songs.

For more information, see: http://www.bayareascience.org/11/06/dd-at-att-park/

Sat. 11/5

College of San Mateo, Building 36
1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA 94402

Family Science and Astronomy Festival

In conjunction with Bay Area Science Festival, College of San Mateo and San Mateo County Astronomical Society presentFamily Science and Astronomy Festival Saturday, Nov. 5, 2:00 - 11:00 pm. Enjoy science and astronomy activities for the whole family. Events are free to the public. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5, and Beethoven Lot 2 by CSM Theatre.


    Photos: John Fiske & Ed Pieret, SMCAS                         Keynote speaker Alex Filippenko      Jazz Under The Stars

Schedule of events:
College of San Mateo, Building 36, 1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard, San Mateo, CA 94402
2:00 pm:                Planetarium show
2:30 to 4:30 pm:   Science demonstrations by CSM science faculty (Biology, Geology, and Physics)
4:30 to 6:30 pm:   Astronomy demonstrations, hands-on workshops, and planetarium shows.

7:00 to 8:30 pm: Keynote speaker: Dr. Alex Filippenko, Professor of Astronomy, UC Berkeley
                           "Dark Energy and the Runaway Universe"  CSM Theater (Building 3).
8:30 to 9:00 pm: Speaker reception in the Theater Lobby

9:15 to 11:00 pm:  Telescope viewing of the night sky in our rooftop observatory. (Dress warmly!)

==========================

Sunday Nov. 6, 12:30PM

AT & T Park
San Francisco

Astronomer to Give Talk on What Happened to Pluto at AT&T Park During Science Festival Sunday, Nov. 6


Astronomer Andrew Fraknoi (Foothill College) will be one of the invited speakers/performers during the Family Science Discovery Day at AT&T Park, Sunday, Nov. 6th.

The all-day event is part of the first-ever Bay Area Science Festival (100 events about science in 10 days from Oct. 29 - Nov. 6, 2011).

Fraknoi will speak from the Main Stage above the dugout in the park at 12:30 pm on the topic:

"Whatever Happened to Pluto: Why It Got Kicked out of the Planet Club, and Why It Had It Coming!"

The entire day is free and open to the public.  There will be many dozens of booths, activities, and exhibits on science throughout AT&T Park.  (The Physics Chanteuse will also perform.)

The demotion of Pluto shocked the public and led to angry letters and even protests in some cities.  But the story of how Pluto became a dwarf started back in the year 1800 when a Sicilian astronomer made a dramatic cosmic discovery.  Popular lecturer and frequent radio guest Andrew Fraknoi will fill everyone in on the behind-the-scenes history of Pluto and what really led to its being kicked out of the planet club.  He will also describe the newer ≥dwarf planets≈ Eris, Makemake, and Haumea, whose discovery contributed to Pluto≠s downfall.

Andrew Fraknoi is the Chair of the Astronomy Department at Foothill College and the former Executive Director of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.  He was selected as the 2007 California Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Endowment and recently won the national Gemant Prize for his work bringing the sciences into popular culture.  You may have heard one of his regular appearances on Bay Area radio; he is a frequent guest on KGO and on the Forum program on KQED. He specializes in explaining astronomical ideas in everyday language. Asteroid 4859 has been named Asteroid Fraknoi to recognize his contributions to the public understanding of science (but he is quick to reassure everyone that it is a very boring asteroid, and not one that could hit the Earth.)

For more information about the Bay Area Science Festival, see: http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/
________________________________________
Monday, 11/07/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM


Commonwealth Club
595 Market Street
2nd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94105


Dava Sobel: A More Perfect Heaven
The bestselling author of Longitude and Galileo's Daughter tells the story of Nicolaus Copernicus and the revolution he inspired. By 1514, the reclusive cleric Copernicus had written an initial outline of his heliocentric theory - in which he defied common sense and received wisdom to place the sun, not the Earth, at the center of our universe. Over the next two decades Copernicus expanded his theory through hundreds of observations, while compiling in secret a book-length manuscript that tantalized mathematicians and scientists throughout Europe. Fearing ridicule, he refused to publish. More than 20 years later, a young German mathematician finally unleashed Copernicus' ideas on the world. Sobel will chronicle the conflicting personalities and extraordinary discoveries that shaped the Copernican revolution, giving us an unforgettable portrait of scientific achievement and of the persistent tensions between science and faith.
Speaker: Dava Sobel, Author, Longitude and Galileo's Daughter; Science Writer
Monday, 11/07/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM


Cost:
$20 standard, MEMBERS FREE, $7 students


==================================


Monday, 11/07/11
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM


California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118


Benjamin Dean Lecture: Sun, Maize, and the Maya Calendar: Maya Astronomy and Enduring Traditions in Mesoamerica


Mesoamerica's great pyramids excite our imagination with images of a fascinating civilization in the distant past, but they also provide a tangible link to the richness and enduring power of Maya culture as expressed by the Maya people today. The infamous year 2012 gains astronomical and cultural significance in a calendar system that connects the Maya, corn, and the zenith passage of the Sun. The presenters will share experiences from recent research trips to Guatemala and Mexico, where they gathered content through the Maya people's own voice regarding the Calendar system and their cultural practices.
Speakers: Dr. Isabel Hawkins, Astronomer, Exploratorium
Doña Maria Ávila Vera, Yucatec Maya Elder
Monday, 11/07/11
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM


Cost:
$12 General, $6 Members
================================





Monday, 11/07/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Commonwealth Club
595 Market Street
2nd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94105

Dava Sobel: A More Perfect Heaven
The bestselling author of Longitude and Galileo's Daughter tells the story of Nicolaus Copernicus and the revolution he inspired. By 1514, the reclusive cleric Copernicus had written an initial outline of his heliocentric theory - in which he defied common sense and received wisdom to place the sun, not the Earth, at the center of our universe. Over the next two decades Copernicus expanded his theory through hundreds of observations, while compiling in secret a book-length manuscript that tantalized mathematicians and scientists throughout Europe. Fearing ridicule, he refused to publish. More than 20 years later, a young German mathematician finally unleashed Copernicus' ideas on the world. Sobel will chronicle the conflicting personalities and extraordinary discoveries that shaped the Copernican revolution, giving us an unforgettable portrait of scientific achievement and of the persistent tensions between science and faith.
Speaker: Dava Sobel, Author, Longitude and Galileo's Daughter; Science Writer
Monday, 11/07/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Cost:
$20 standard, MEMBERS FREE, $7 students

==================================

Monday, 11/07/11
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Benjamin Dean Lecture: Sun, Maize, and the Maya Calendar: Maya Astronomy and Enduring Traditions in Mesoamerica

Mesoamerica's great pyramids excite our imagination with images of a fascinating civilization in the distant past, but they also provide a tangible link to the richness and enduring power of Maya culture as expressed by the Maya people today. The infamous year 2012 gains astronomical and cultural significance in a calendar system that connects the Maya, corn, and the zenith passage of the Sun. The presenters will share experiences from recent research trips to Guatemala and Mexico, where they gathered content through the Maya people's own voice regarding the Calendar system and their cultural practices.
Speakers: Dr. Isabel Hawkins, Astronomer, Exploratorium
Doña Maria Ávila Vera, Yucatec Maya Elder
Monday, 11/07/11
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Cost:
$12 General, $6 Members
================================
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 - 7:00pm

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Past Climate In Antarctica: Looking Back to Our Future
Stephen Pekar
City University of New York
Carbon dioxide levels are predicted to rise during this century to levels not seen in 25 to 50 million years. Back during this time, the Earth changed from a generally ice-free Œgreenhouse world‚ to a more much colder and heavily glaciated Œicehouse world‚. Dr. Pekar will provide an overview of Antarctic climate changes when CO2 levels were similar to what is predicted for this century and also provide some of early results from IODP Wilkes Land Expedition.

Dr. Pekar is traveling to the SETI Institute with the assistance of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Leadership Distinguished Lecturer Series.


================================

Fri. 11/11 7PM The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914

================================

Fri. 11/11 and Sat. 11/12

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

==================================

Fri. 11/11 and Sat. 11/12

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.

==================================

Fri. 11/11 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

==================================
Sat. 11/12   10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

==================================

Sat. November 12, 8PM-San Jose Astronomical Association mtg.

Hogue Park, San Jose

General Meeting - Guest speaker:
Rogelio Bernal Andreo
Deep Sky Wide Field Imaging

===================================
Sun. Nov. 13 12N-4P

SJAA Swap Meet: Noon to 4pm 11/13
In the Hall at Houge Park, San Jose
All are welcome to buy and sell your surplus astronomical equipment and other optics and electronomics
A 10% donation from sales is suggested.

===================================
Tues. 11/15 7PM Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society mtg.-My goodness! The Nobel winning inventor of the laser!

Concord Police Association Facility, 5060 Avila Rd, Concord, CA 94520

General Meeting - Measuring how stars change
Doors open at 6:45.
FEATURED SPEAKER: Dr. Charles Townes, Nobel Laureate, UCB

Title: Interferometric Measurements of the Size and Behavior (including size changes) of Stars

Date: Tuesday, 11/15/2011
Time: 7:15 PM - 9:15 PM
Location: Concord Police Association Facility, 5060 Avila Rd, Concord, CA 94520

===================================

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Jupiter Picture of the Day
Mike Wong
Center for Integrative Planetary Science, UC Berkeley
The rich history of time-domain Jupiter data is of great value because it provides a whole new angle of attack, distinct from spatial-domain (imaging) data or from spectral-domain data. Time-domain Jupiter data provides a unique way to learn more about processes such as heat transport, atmospheric structure and evolution, composition, the formation of clouds and hazes, impact processes, and impactor populations. Dr. Wong will discuss three recent changes in Jupiter's atmosphere: the reddening of Oval BA (and how vortices probe the deep atmosphere), shifts in the upper tropospheric haze layer (discovered with an experimental multi-conjugate adaptive optics technique), and the 2009 and 2010 impacts discovered by amateur astronomers.


===================================

Wednesday, November 16, 2011  7PM ˆ SFAA General Meeting

Randall Museum . 199 Museum Way . San Francisco 7:00 pm Doors Open . 7:30 pm Announcements . 8:00 pm Speaker SFAA‚s General Meetings take place on the 3rd Wednesday of each month (except January)
DR. NICK KANAS Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry University of California San Francisco
PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES AFFECTING ASTRONAUTS IN SPACE
A number of psychiatric and interpersonal issues can affect astronauts in space. Professor Nick Kanas will review important psychosocial issues, describe his research with astronauts and cosmonauts who have flown on the Mir and International Space Stations, and discuss countermeasures that will improve the psychological well-being of future space travelers.
____________________________________
Dr. Kanas is an Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. For over 35 years, he has conducted research on people under stress, and he has over 200 professional publications. For over 15 years, he has been a NASA- funded principal investigator, doing psychological research with astronauts and cosmonauts. Together with Dietrich Manzey, he is the co-author of the book Space Psychology and Psychiatry (2nd ed.), which was given the 2004 International Academy
of Astronautics Life Science Book Award. In 1999, Dr. Kanas received the Aerospace Medical Association Raymond F. Longacre Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in the Psychological and Psychiatric Aspects of Aerospace Medicine. In 2008, he received the International Academy of Astronautics Life Science Award. Dr. Kanas has been a member of San Francisco Amateur Astronomers for over 30 years and is deeply interested in astronomy. This marks the third lecture he will be presenting for San Francisco Amateur Astronomers.

===================================

Thursday, 11/17/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Mori Point
Mori Point Dr
Pacificia, CA 94044

Astronomy in the Park

Join Suzanne Gurton, the Education Manager at the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Price Sheppy from Park Stewardship as we enjoy our night time National Park. We will be exploring the stars above through education, activities, and star gazing opportunities. This will be a great experience for all ages.
Gaze into the dancing heaven of stars during the Leonid meteor shower while listening to our resident chorus of frogs. We will be learning about the similarity between our amphibian friends and the lives of the stars.
RSVP required for all events. Bad weather will cancel events. You will be notified by email if the event is cancelled because of bad weather.
For all events please bring:
     Warm Clothes
     Blankets to lay on and snuggle up in
     Binoculars for looking at the moon and stars
     A flashlight
South end of Bradford Way at Mori Point Drive.
Thursday, 11/17/11
05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Cost:
Free

===================================

Thursday, 11/17/11
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Into Space Nightlife
In honor of humanity's efforts to explore the final frontier, NightLife celebrates space and space exploration this week.  Check out the live view through NASA's GLAST Optical Robotic Telescope (GORT for short), which views gamma rays, allowing scientists to discover exoplanets and answer persistent questions about supermassive black-hole systems, pulsars, and much more. Try your hand at steering through the cosmos using innovative World Wide Telescope technology. The software brings together the latest imagery with 3D-navigation and kinect technology, allowing users to navigate the Universe with gestures, rather than a controller. In the planetarium, catch a live performance called The Kepler Project at 6:30 and 7:30, which tells the story of Johannes Kepler's brilliant contributions during the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century through a combination of multimedia and live performance. Plus, catch Star Trek (2009) in the Forum Theater, a short program on the Kepler mission in the planetarium lobby, a special showing of Fragile Planet at 8:30, and intimate tours of the night sky and the Universe in the mini-planetarium dome. Music by Space Cowboys.
21 and over.
Thursday, 11/17/11
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Cost:
$12 General, $10 Members

===================================

Thursday, 11/17/11
Starts at 07:00 PM

NASA Ames Exploration Center
Moffett Field
Mountain View, CA 94035

Curious About Mars? Learn About the Mars Science Laboratory
NASA's David Blake will give a free public lecture about Mars and NASA's next mission to Mars ˆ the Mars Science Laboratory in the NASA Ames Exploration Center. Doors to the Exploration Center will open at 6 p.m., and seating is first-come, first-served.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, including the rover named Curiosity, is scheduled to launch from Kennedy Space Center on Nov. 25, 2011. Upon arriving at Mars, Curiosity will spend 23 months collecting and analyzing dozens of samples drilled from rocks or scooped from the ground as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover.

Thursday, 11/17/11
Starts at 07:00 PM

Cost:
Free

====================================

Friday, 11/18/11
Starts at 07:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Telescope Making
Amateur telescope making, why, how and where.  With members of the Chabot Science Center's Telescope Maker's Workshop.

Cost:
Free

====================================

Fri. 11/18 7PM The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914

================================

Fri. 11/18 and Sat. 11/19

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

==================================

Fri. 11/18 and Sat. 11/19

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.

==================================

Saturday, 11/19/11
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

UC Berkeley
Genetics & Plant Biology Building
Berkeley, CA 94720

Speaker: Genevieve Graves, UC Berkeley
Room 100
Saturday, 11/19/11
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

From Gas into Galaxies: Just Add Gravity!
Galaxies, like our own Milky Way, are not eternal or changeless. They are born in the early universe out of massive clouds of gas. In their early years, they experience rapid growth, forming lots of new stars out of the matter that streams in to feed them. As teenagers, they collide with other galaxies, setting off massive new bursts of star formation and growing large black holes at their centers. From there, they settle down into a sustainable mode, forming stars reliably (to pay the mortgage!) and only occasionally having a run-in with another galaxy. Finally, in their old age, they retire from the star-formation business and relax, coasting out the rest of time with their dwindling supply of stars. This talk will trace the life-cycle of galaxies, large and small, from the early universe to the present. Come learn about the origins and the ultimate fate of this "island universe" we call the Milky Way!


Cost:
Free
===================================

Saturday, 11/19/11
Starts at 02:00 PM

NASA Ames Exploration Center
Moffett Field
Mountain View, CA 94035

Mars Expert David Des Marais to Share Insights about Red Planet
NASA's David Des Marais will share insights about Mars ˆ what we know now and what we expect to learn from the Mars Science Laboratory Mission ˆ during a free public lecture Nov. 19, 2011. Attendees will also have an opportunity to learn about Mars-related citizen science programs.

Mars is the one other planet in the solar system that apparently had a climate most similar to that of Earth. Mars has a core, mantle and crust, and it has preserved an ancient geological record that has no parallel on Earth. An early hydrological cycle sustained precipitation, streams and lakes. Later in Mars' history, volcanism, impacts, groundwater and ice interacted at least locally. Liquid water participated in the chemical weathering of rocks and also created distinctive environments that potentially sustained life.

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will investigate a landing site in Gale crater to determine whether it ever hosted an environment capable of supporting microbial life. A 5 km-high mound on the floor of the crater consists of layered sedimentary rocks having diverse minerals (sulfates and clays) that formed in the presence of liquid water. This rock sequence was deposited over an extended time period in diverse potentially habitable environments.

Saturday, 11/19/11
Starts at 02:00 PM

Cost:
Free

===================================

Sat. 11/19 San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Star Parties At Crestview Park, San Carlos

Sunset:  4:56pm

Star Parties At Crestview Park
Come out and bring the kids for a mind expanding look at the universe

The City of San Carlos Parks and Recreation Department and the San
Mateo County Astronomical Society has open Star Parties twice a
month. These events are held in Crestview Park, San Carlos California.

Note that inclement weather
(clouds, excessive wind and showers) will cause the event to be
canceled without notice.

For more information call Bob Black, (650)592-2166, or send an email
to SMCAS@live.com or call Ed Pieret at (650)862-9602.

Reasons to Attend
If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a
real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.
If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a
telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.
If you think you might have an interest in astronomy come and talk to
experienced amateur astronomers.

Cautions
Dress warmly and wear a hat.
Visitors should park on the street and walk into the park so your
headlights don't affect the observer's dark adaptation.
Only park in the parking lot if you are arriving before dark and plan
to stay until the end of the event.
You shouldn't need lights but if you feel you do, only bring a small
flashlight with the lens covered using red cellophane or red balloon.
Please respect the telescopes and ask permission from the owner if
you wish to touch.
Parents, please watch your children.
The park is residential, and adjacent to homes and backyards, please
keep noise to a minimum.
Schedule
Time

Astronomers arrive to set up at around sunset. Observing starts at
about one hour after sunset and continues for two to three hours.

==================================

Saturday, November 19, 2011 7:30 PM East Bay Astronomical Society mtg.

Upcoming Event:
EAS General Meeting

Date and Time:
Saturday, November 19, 2011

Location:
Chabot Space &
Science Center,
Hauben Resource
Center Room,
2nd Floor, Dellums Bldg

Speaker:
Joseph Bartolick
Scientist
Lawrence Livermore National Labs

Subject:
Amateur Solar Observation - What to See and How to See It


==================================

Fri. 11/18 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

==================================
Sat. 11/19   10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

==================================
Monday, 11/21/11
Starts at 04:15 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Cosmology and large Structures
Speaker: Steve Allen, SLAC Kavli Institute
Monday, 11/21/11
Starts at 04:15 PM

Cost:
Free

=================================

Friday, 11/25/11
Starts at 06:30 AM

NASA Ames Exploration Center
Moffett Field
Mountain View, CA 94035

Public Invited to Watch as NASA Begins Journey Back to Mars
Curiosity, NASA's next Mars rover, is scheduled to launch from Kennedy Space Center in FL at 7:21 a.m. PST. Members of the public are invited to the NASA Ames Exploration Center to view the live, televised launch on the large, immersive theater screen.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to deliver a large, mobile laboratory ˆ the rover Curiosity ˆ to Mars. The public is invited to view the live, televised launch in the NASA Ames Exploration Center. The launch window opens at 7:21 a.m. PST, and the Exploration Center will open at 6:30 a.m. The launch will be preceded with brief comments from NASA scientist, Tori Hoehler who will share information about the upcoming mission.

Curiosity has 10 science instruments to search for evidence about whether Mars has had environments favorable for microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. Ames scientist, Dr. David Blake, is the principal investigator for the instrument called CheMin, an X-ray diffraction and fluorescence instrument designed to identify and quantify the minerals in rocks and soils, and to measure bulk composition. Other Ames Scientists, Dr. David Des Marais and Dr. Robert Haberle are also members of the Mars Science Laboratory science teams.

Cost:
Free

=================================

Fri. 11/25 7PM The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914

================================

Fri. 11/25 and Sat. 11/26

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

==================================

Fri. 11/25 and Sat. 11/26

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.
==================================

Sat. 11/26 San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Star Parties At Crestview Park, San Carlos

Sunset:  4:53pm

Star Parties At Crestview Park
Come out and bring the kids for a mind expanding look at the universe

The City of San Carlos Parks and Recreation Department and the San
Mateo County Astronomical Society has open Star Parties twice a
month. These events are held in Crestview Park, San Carlos California.

Note that inclement weather
(clouds, excessive wind and showers) will cause the event to be
canceled without notice.

For more information call Bob Black, (650)592-2166, or send an email
to SMCAS@live.com or call Ed Pieret at (650)862-9602.

Reasons to Attend
If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a
real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.
If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a
telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.
If you think you might have an interest in astronomy come and talk to
experienced amateur astronomers.

Cautions
Dress warmly and wear a hat.
Visitors should park on the street and walk into the park so your
headlights don't affect the observer's dark adaptation.
Only park in the parking lot if you are arriving before dark and plan
to stay until the end of the event.
You shouldn't need lights but if you feel you do, only bring a small
flashlight with the lens covered using red cellophane or red balloon.
Please respect the telescopes and ask permission from the owner if
you wish to touch.
Parents, please watch your children.
The park is residential, and adjacent to homes and backyards, please
keep noise to a minimum.
Schedule
Time

Astronomers arrive to set up at around sunset. Observing starts at
about one hour after sunset and continues for two to three hours.

=================================

Fri. 11/25 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

==================================
Sat. 11/26  10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

=================================

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 12:00pm

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Inefficient Collisions, Hit-and-Runs, and Splats

Erik Asphaug
Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz

In pairwise accretion -- that is, the formation of bigger planets hierarchically from smaller ones -- the typical encounter speeds are comparable to the escape velocities of the dominant bodies, and the colliding bodies are of comparable size. This is a far cry from the two most commonly considered regimes: hypervelocity bullets hitting a much larger target (a.k.a. impact cratering), and the perfect mergers (sometimes with a disruption threshold) assumed in nearly every N-body simulation of planetesimal/planetary growth. The best studied case is the Moon's formation by a giant impact. Direct modeling of pairwise accretion -- which is not always accretionary -- has led to several new models that will be presented: (1) the origin of chondrules by relatively slow collisions between similar-sized molten planetesimals (Asphaug et al. 2011), (2) the origin of the lunar farside highlands by a low-velocity 'big splat' (Jutzi and Asphaug 2011), and (3) the stripping of mantles from asteroids and planets (for instance Mercury) when they almost but not quite accrete with a larger body (Asphaug 2010).

=================================


Wednesday, 11/30/11
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Stanford University
School of Education, 485 Lausen Mall
Cubberley Auditorium
Stanford, CA 94305

Mathematics and Magic Tricks: A Look behind the Veil
The way that a magic trick works can be just as amazing as the trick itself.  I will illustrate with performance-level magic, whose workings involve a look at combinatorics, number theory, and higher algebra.  This talk is aimed at a broad public audience; no prior 'mathemagical' knowledge required.
Speaker: Professor Persi Diaconis

Cost:
Free

==================================

Thursday, 12/01/11
04:15 PM - 05:45 PM


Stanford University
Lane History Corner (Bldg 200)
Room 217
Stanford, CA 94305

Visual Evidence in Scientific Practice
An account of visual evidence is provided and its changing roles in different domains of science are examined. The various roles are discussed in the context of molecular biology, biochemistry, and particle physics.
Speaker: Otávio Bueno, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami

Cost:
Free

==================================
Fri. December 2nd, 2011  7:30PM for pizza- San Mateo County Astronomical Society mtg.

College of San Mateo
1700 W. Hillsdale Boulevard, San Mateo, CA
The CSM Planetarium  Bldg 36, Parking Lot 5  

SPEAKERS:              Dr. Aparna Venkatesan                   

                                Assistant Professor of Astronomy

                                University of San Francisco                                        

TOPIC:                      The First Stars in the Universe                    

TIME:                         8:00pm  December 2nd
WHERE:                    The CSM Planetarium  Bldg 36, Parking Lot 5  
.                                 Free and open to the public                                           

Modern cosmological observations imply that the first stars in the universe were unique objects that strongly influenced their environment, despite their brief existence. This talk will present the current data and theoretical ideas on these stars, and how future telescopes can detect them

Speaker Biography:

Dr. Venkatesan graduated from the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago in 2000; and received her bachelor's degree from Cornell University's Astronomy Department in 1993 .

Dr. Venkatesan's research interests are primarily in theoretical cosmology, including studies of the first stars and quasars in the universe, the evolution of cosmic star formation and related observational signatures, the physics and chemistry of gas in the early universe, the cosmic microwave background, and dark matter. She is currently working on the cosmic synthesis of the biogenic elements at early times in the universe (with Dr. Lynn Rothschild, NASA-Ames), and on projects related to helium reionization and its effects on the intergalactic medium with collaborators Prof. Michael Shull (CU-Boulder) and Dr. Andrew Benson (Caltech).

She joined USF's physics department in Fall 2006 to help expand the astronomy and astrophysics program. Through the introduction of new astronomy and astrophysics courses over the last few years, and the upgrading of USF's observing facilities, they now have new two undergraduate minors (astronomy, and astrophysics) starting in Fall 2009.

Before moving to the Bay Area, she held an NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy at the University of Colorado at Boulder

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Friday, 12/02/11
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

November Star Party
Star Party at Hogue Park
Friday, 12/02/11
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Cost:
Free

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Fri. 12/2 7PM The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

The Telescope Makers‚ Workshop is held every Friday night from 7pm - 10pm,
excluding major holidays (e.g. Christmas Day and New Year's Day) that fall on
Fridays. The Workshop is always closed on Memorial Day Weekend. Attendance every
Friday night is not mandatory, and members work at their own pace.
The Workshop meets at Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd.,
Oakland. Contact us for more specific details:
Contact: E-mail Richard Ozer (rozer@pacbell.net) or (510) 406-1914

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Fri. 12/2 and Sat. 12/3

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information:
http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -
10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and
see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun,
moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.
(weather permitting)
12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open

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Fri. 12/2 and Sat. 12/3

Chabot Space and Science Center
Skies!
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Dinner, a Movie, and the Universe at Chabot Space Center
06:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland
Join us for Chabot's unique evening social rendezvous.
Start your night off with dinner and drinks, then cozy up in the planetarium as
you're whisked to the edge of the universe and cap off the evening with
telescope viewing featuring breathtaking views of the cosmos. Dinner: Buy
advance tickets to ensure your dinner reservation. Purchase dinner separately at
the cafe ($15).

ADVANCED TICKETS
A Movie and the Universe: Admission to Chabot includes all access to our
interactive exhibitions, a film in the MegaDome theater AND a show in the
Digital Planetarium. Purchase your advanced tickets online or call the Box
Office at (510) 336-7373.
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Saturday, 12/03/11
08:00 PM - 10:00 PM

College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd
Planetarium (Bldg 36)
San Mateo, CA 94402
USA

Jazz under the Stars
Visit our roof top observatory to see the first quarter moon and Jupiter thru telescopes.
Dress warmly and come by anytime between 8 and 10 pm.

"Jazz" night is Saturday Dec. 3 from 8-10 PM. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5.

No food or drinks in the observatory. Children are welcome and need to be attended at all times.
Saturday, 12/03/11
08:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Cost:
Free

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Fri. 12/2 9PM

Foothill Community College

12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from
9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through
the observatory's new computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the
moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. The choice
of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are
currently in the sky.

On clear, dark, moonless nights, the telescopes give visitors views into the
deeper reaches of space. Star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies provide
dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.

The public viewing programs at Foothill are free of charge and are open to
guests of all ages. Please note that the observatory is closed when the weather
is cloudy. Also note that visitor parking permits are available from the
machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the parking lots for $2.00.

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Sat. 12/3  10AM

Foothill Community College
12345 Moody Rd.
Los Altos Hills, CA

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear
Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday
morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface
features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.
Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd. exit. The observatory is next to
parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are
available from the machines in the
parking lots for $ 2.00.

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