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Astronomy Events in Northern California

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EAS CALENDAR


   From: Kenneth Lum
________________________________________________________________________

Events of Week of 4/20/2015 and Beyond

Monday, 04/20/15
08:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Entangled Photons: Einstein's Spooky Action in Quantum Communication and Teleportation
Prof. Anton Zeilinger of the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences will give the annual Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lecture.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday, April 21 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Paleoenvironmnetal Reconstruction and the Identification of Habitable Conditions on Ancient Earth and Mars Using Clay Minerals
Tom Bristow
SETI Institute

==================================

Tuesday, 04/21/15
04:15 PM - 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Stanford University
Room 201
Stanford, CA 94305

Quantum Entanglement in Higher Dimensions
The 2015 Robert Hofstadter Memorial lecturer, Prof. Anton Zeilinger of the Univ. of Vienna & the Austrian Academy of Sciences, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday, 04/21/15 6:00 PM

Stanford University
Cubberley Auditorium
485 Lausen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Imagining the Universe: Andrei Linde - 'Universe or Multiverse

Cosmological observations show that the universe is very uniform on the maximally large scale accessible to our telescopes. The best theoretical explanation of this uniformity is provided by the inflationary theory. Rather paradoxically, this theory also predicts that on a very large scale, much greater than what we can see now, the world may look totally different. Instead of being a single spherically symmetric balloon, our universe may look like a "multiverse", a collection of many different exponentially large balloons ("universes") with different laws of physics operating in each of them. The new cosmological paradigm, supported by recent developments in string theory, changes the standard views on the origin and the global structure of the universe and on our own place in the world.

Speaker: Andrei Linde, Stanford

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday April 21 2015 7PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Presidio, Observation Post / Building 211
211 Lincoln Boulevard
San Francisco, CA

“The Dark Side of the Universe” by Norbert Werner, Ph.D, Kavli Institute / Stanford University

Most of the Universe is unseen: 95% of its contents consist of dark matter and dark energy, which we do not yet understand. But even when it comes to the 5% “normal” matter, we can only see the tip of the tip of the iceberg. My talk will focus on this unseen “Dark Side of the Universe” and will show how the unseen dark energy, dark matter, and the invisible super massive black holes sculpt the observed Universe.
“I am an astrophysicist at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University. You can also often find me at the Japanese Space Agency (ISAS/JAXA) near Tokyo where, next to my everyday research, I am helping to prepare the initial observing program for the upcoming Japanese-US Astro-H satellite. Before I came to sunny California I did my PhD at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, in the rainy but magically beautiful city of Utrecht in the Netherlands. I spent my undergraduate years at the Safarik University in Kosice in my home country Slovakia.”

==================================

Wednesday, 04/22/15
01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

Redwoods A/B
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Recent advances in reflective hard x-ray / soft gamma-ray optics and the prospects for future astrophysical missions
Over the last forty years, reflective x-ray telescopes have enabled detailed observations of the 0.1-10 keV x-ray sky and dramatically improved our knowledge of astrophysical processes, cosmology and fundamental physics.   Focusing optics overcome intrinsic limitations of other techniques (e.g., absorptive collimation), and their use above 10 keV should revolutionize our understanding of the hard Xxray Universe.  The early science results from NASA's NuSTAR, the first satellite to provide true-focusing from up to 78 keV, show the promise of extending this technology above 100 keV.

In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in multilayer x-ray optics that have demonstrated excellent performance at energies beyond 600 keV.  After presenting results from our active research program at Lawrence Livermore, I will describe how reflective multilayer-coated mirrors could be used for a future satellite mission that could provide sub arc-minute imaging beyond 0.5 MeV.

Speaker: Michael Pivovafoff, Lawrence Livermore National Labs

Cost:
Free

==================================

Thursday, 04/23/15
12:00 AM - 03:00 AM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Lyrids Meteor Shower
Hang out on the hill and watch as the Lyrids Meteor Shower makes it annual trip through our atmosphere and light up the night sky. Our astronomers are on hand to answer questions.

*Visibility is subject to weather conditions.

Contact:
Website: Click to Visit

Cost:
$5

==================================

Thursday, 04/23/15  07:00 PM

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series
345 Middlefield Road
USGS Conference Room A, Bldg 3
Menlo Park, CA 94025

A Sight 'Fearfully Grand' Eruptions of Lassen Peak, California, 1914 to 1917

    • A summary of the eruptions and their effects
    • Illustrated with historical photographs
Speaker: Michael Clynne, USGS

Cost:
Free

==================================

Thurs, April 23, 2015 • 8 p.m.

Exploratorium
Pier 15
698 The Embarcadero
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: The Universe

We tend to think of "home" as the building in which we live, or the town or city where we reside. Voyage to the edge of the known universe, and gain some perspective on the tiny planet we call home. See some of the amazing ways the universe is structured, and learn how it's evolved.

Website: http://exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-universe-april-23-2015

Cost:
Free with admission

==================================

Fri. 4/24/2015

San Jose Astronomical Association
In-Town Public Star Party
Houge Park
San Jose, CA


Public Star Parties are not like other parties where people snack and drink. Instead theses are star gazing parties where the SJAA and their members set up telescopes and let the public view the night skies at their leisure all for Free. Members are there to assist the public and answer any questions anyone may have. Non-members are also encouraged to bring their telescopes to share with the public. The event lasts up to 2 hours. You are welcome to bring your own telescope (we are not be liable for your equipment) but please arrive roughly 1 hour before the start so as to have time to set up. The general public is invited to come and view the skies. All ages are welcomed.

==================================

Fri. 4/24/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 4/24/2015 and Sat. 4/25/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 4/24/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 4/25/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 04/25/15
08:00 PM - 10:00 PM

College of San Mateo
Building 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars
See the first quarter moon, Jupiter, and more thru our telescopes, while listening to KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly and come by anytime between 8:00 & 10:00 pm.  Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Sunday, April 26, 2015 • 11:00 a.m., 2:00 p.m., and 3:30 p.m.

Exploratorium
Pier 15
698 The Embarcadero
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: The Universe

We tend to think of "home" as the building in which we live, or the town or city where we reside. Voyage to the edge of the known universe, and gain some perspective on the tiny planet we call home. See some of the amazing ways the universe is structured, and learn how it's evolved.

Website: http://exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-universe-april-26-2015

Cost:
Free with admission

==================================


Tuesday, April 28 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Shape dynamics: a relational view of the Universe
Henrique Gomes
Perimeter Institute

Shape Dynamics is a new theory of gravity which removes the notion of local relativistic time from the guiding principles of gravity in the universe. It is a very promising approach which has been shown to be equivalent to Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, without being embedded in time. It is inspired by adherence to Mach's Principle, which is violated by Einstein's theory.

Shape Dynamics provides new tools in the quest for a theory that describes quantum gravity.

In the first part of the talk Dr. Gomes will review some of the Machian motivations for shape dynamics and sketch its construction.
In the second half, Dr. Gomes will talk about recent developments on black holes in this formulation, and discuss some positive aspects of its ongoing quantization program.

==================================

Tuesday, 4/28/2015   7:15 PM - 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

General Meeting
Doors open at 6:45.

Speaker:   Chris Ford

Topic:   Amateur Astrograph Telescope Designs

==================================

Friday, 05/01/15  08:00 PM

College of San Mateo
Building 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Globular Clusters of the Milky Way

Much of Graeme Smith's research centers around properties of red giant stars within the Milky Way galaxy: their physical evolution, their chromospheric activity and mass loss, and what they can tell us about the chemical enrichment history of the Galaxy. Much of this later work has been directed towards the study of abundance differences among stars within globular clusters. These ancient stellar systems formed at a time when the process of chemical enrichment was just commencing within the Milky Way galaxy. Striking differences in the abundances of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen exist among stars within the same globular cluster. Understanding the origin of these differences can provide information about the early environment in the halo of the Galaxy, within which the globular clusters formed, as well as processes such as deep mixing that occur within the interiors of cluster red giants.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Fri. 5/1/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 5/1/2015 and Sat. 5/2/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 5/1/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 5/2/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 05/02/15  08:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

An Introduction to Deep Sky Video Astronomy
Video astronomy is no longer just for the planets, the moon and the sun. Today's astro-video cameras can easily reach down to 18th magnitude or lower and bring up dramatic color views of galaxies, nebulae, star clusters and many other deep sky objects. No longer do you need to stare at a faint fuzzy image of a distant galaxy in your eyepiece. With a video camera costing less than a good eyepiece, you can view dust lanes and globular clusters on the screen of your TV with ease.

I will show you images taken from my back yard in Livermore, as well as, images taken at CalStar and GSSP of a variety of DSOs using several different cameras and scopes. I will review and show you many of the available video cameras and their different features from a $35 DIY camera to a $1800 top of the line camera. I will discuss the advantages of video, show the equipment needed to get started and provide an in-door demonstration with a camera and small scope.

Hopefully, you will learn why so many are now turning to video to re-energize their interest in astronomy and you will see how video is a great tool for public outreach. You will even learn how to use video astronomy as an easy and inexpensive way to get started in astrophotography.

Speaker: Curtis Macchioni

Cost:
Free

==================================



------------------------------------
END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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