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EAS CALENDAR

From: Kenneth Lum

Events of Week of 01/25/2016 and Beyond   
   From: Kenneth Lum


Message
________________________________________________________________________
Events of Week of 02/01/2016 and Beyond

Monday, 02/01/16
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Improving Cosmological Distance Measurements with Twin Type Ia Supernovae

Type Ia supernovae are used as "standardizable candles" for cosmological distance measurements. I will present a new method for identifying "twin" Type Ia supernovae, and I will discuss how we can use these twins to improve distance measurements. This novel approach to Type Ia supernova standardization is made possible by spectrophotometric time series observations from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). With this method, we are able to standardize supernovae to ~0.08 mag, a reduction of ~3/4 in the variance compared to commonly used techniques. We also mitigate several important supernova systematics. I will discuss both the usage of the twins method and the data requirements to implement it. I will also present SeeChange, an ongoing HST survey looking for Type Ia supernovae in the highest-redshift, most massive clusters known to date. This survey will extend the supernova Hubble Diagram out to z~1.5, and will place strong constraints on time-varying dark energy.

Speaker: Kyle Boone, UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs

Cost:
Free

==================================

Monday, 02/01/16
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Stanford University
Room 201
Stanford, CA 94305

Exploring how the universe began (mini-course lecture 1 of 2)
Speaker: Professor Leonardy Senatore

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, February 02 2016 - 12:00 pm, PST

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
Galileo Auditorium, Microsoft SVC Building One
1065 La Avenida
Mountain View, CA 94043

Exoplanet spectroscopy with diffraction primary objective telescopy
Tom Ditto, NIAC

When diffraction is employed as the primary collector modality of a telescope instead of reflection or refraction, a new set of performance capabilities emerges. A diffraction-based telescope forms a spectrogram first and an image as secondary data. The results are startling. In multiple object capability, the diffraction telescope on earth can capture 2 million spectra to R > 100,000 in a single night, better for a census of exoplanets by radial velocity than any prior art. In a space telescope in a direct observation mode, this type diffraction primary objective could reveal spectral analyses of individual exoplanets. We introduce three embodiments: THE MOST, HOMES and ADEDPT.

Tom Ditto has served as a Fellow of NASA Advanced Innovative Concepts and a P.I. in the National Science Foundation SBIR program working in holographic optics. He is also a Fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and the American Film Institute. He promises a rousing media presentation.

==================================

Wednesday, 02/03/16  07:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Life Beyond Our Solar System

In 1584, the Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno speculated that there are "innumerable globes like this one on which we live and grow."  It would be more than four centuries before the discovery of the first planets beyond our solar system lent support to Bruno's idea, but thousands of such exoplanets have now been identified. Indeed, our galaxy probably hosts billions of planetary systems. But how many of those globes are "like this one" and how can we determine whether life has taken hold there, too? In this talk, Dr. Hoehler will discuss the science of searching for life beyond our solar system, and will take us from what we know today to how we will seek evidence of inhabited worlds in the future.

Speaker: Tori Hoehler, NASA Ames

Cost:  Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Thursday, 02/04/16  11:00 AM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 103/104
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Gravitational Microlensing Surveys for Exoplanets: A Watershed
Speaker: Scot Gaudi, Ohio State Univ.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Thurs. Feb 04   4PM

Lockheed Martin Colloquia
3251 Hanover St
Building 202 Auditorium
Palo Alto, CA 94304

SCREAMING VOLCANOES

Dr. Eric Dunham, Stanford University

Volcanic eruptions are driven by pressurization of magma by exsolution of dissolved volatiles like water. Because these processes take place deep within the Earth, direct observation is impossible. Here we exploit some remarkable seismic waves from volcanoes in Alaska and Hawaii to place constraints on pre-eruptive processes and the magma plumbing system. Check out some volcano "sounds" at http://news.stanford.edu/pr/2013/pr-volcano-seismic-sound-071413.html that we think are caused by repeating earthquakes popping off up to twenty times per second!

Dr. Eric M. Dunham is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geophysics at Stanford University and an affiliated faculty member with Stanford's Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. Drawing on his background in theoretical physics, Prof. Dunham uses modeling and computation to study natural hazards like earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis. His an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in Physics (2013) and received an NSF Career award (2012) and the School of Earth Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award (2014).

==================================

Thursday, 02/04/16
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Civic Center Library
1188 South Livermore Avenue
Livermore, CA 94550

Positrons, Lasers and Robots: How Close Does Our Science Come to Asimov's Vision of the Future?

Join us for a fascinating discussion about the science behind I, Robot.  Can modern science create the world Isaac Asimov envisioned?

Speaker; Dr. Scott Wilks

This program is part of Livermore Reads Together 2016, featuring the book I, Robot by Isaac Asimov.   For more information abotu Livermore Reads Together, visit www.livermorelibrary.net.

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/05/16
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Evergreen Valley College
Visual Performance Arts (APA) Theater
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

A Planet for Goldilocks: NASA's Search for Life beyond the Solar System

Not too hot, not too cold" reads the prescription for a world that's just right for life as we know it. Finding evidence of life beyond Earth is one of the primary goals of science agencies in the United States and abroad. The goal looms closer as a result of discoveries made by NASA's Kepler Mission. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems orbiting other stars in the galaxy. Finding inhabited environments is a path of exploration that stretches decades into the future. It begins by determining if Goldilocks planets abound. Dr. Batalha will describe the latest discoveries of NASA's Kepler Mission and the possibilities for finding inhabited environments in the not-so-distant future.

Dr. Natalie Batalha is a world renowned research astronomer in the Space Sciences Division of NASA Ames Research Center and the Kepler Mission Scientist, and working on the transit photometry – which is an emerging technology for finding exoplanets. Dr. Batalha started her career as a stellar spectroscopist studying young, sun-like stars. She holds a doctorate in astrophysics from UC Santa Cruz, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Parking & campus map: Free parking after 6:00 PM in parking lot #6 for this event.

Website:  http://evc-cit.info/astronews/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/05/16  08:00 PM

San Mateo County Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo
Building 36, Plsnetarium
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Are We Truly Alone? The Search for Life in the Universe

Each recent report of liquid water existing elsewhere in the solar system has reverberated through the international press and excited the imagination of humankind. We have come to realize that where there is liquid water on Earth, virtually no matter what the physical conditions, there is life. Dr. Lynn Rothschild, an evolutionary biologist known for her work on life in extreme environments and a founder of the field of astrobiology, tells us about intriguing new data.

Dr. Lynn Rothschild, NASA Ames Research Center

Website:  http://www.smcas.net/events/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Fri. 2/5/2016 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri.2/5/2016 and Sat. 2/6/2016

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 2/5/2016 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 2/6/2016 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 02/06/16
01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Civic Center Library
1188 South Livermore Avenue
Livermore, CA 94550

Students' Robotics Fair at Livermore Public Library

Celebrate Livermore Reads Together and Livermore Science and Engineering Month.  Join us at the Students' Robotics Fair at the Civic Center Library, co-sponsored by the Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District (LVJUSD).

Students from LVJUSD will demonstrate robotics projects they created.

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/08/16
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Stanford University
Room 201
Stanford, CA 94305

Exploring how the universe began (mini-course lecture 2 of 2)
Speaker: Professor Leonardy Senatore

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, February 09 2016 - 12:00 pm, PST

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
Galileo Auditorium, Microsoft SVC Building One
1065 La Avenida
Mountain View, CA 94043

Geology After Pluto

Jeff Moore
NASA Ames Research Center

Jeff Moore is the lead of the New Horizons Geology Team. He will talk about the discoveries made by the New Horizons mission on the fascinating fly by of the dwarf planet Pluto.

==================================

Thurs. 02/11/2016  4PM

Lockheed Martin Colloquia
3251 Hanover St
Building 202 Auditorium
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Prospecting for Habitable Planets

Dr. Jon Jenkins, NASA Ames Research Center

NASA's Kepler Mission was launched in March 2009 as NASA's first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, that range of distances for which liquid water would pool on the surface of a rocky planet. Kepler has discovered over 1000 planets and over 4600 candidates, many of them as small as the Earth. Today, Kepler's amazing success seems to be a fait accompli to those unfamiliar with her history. But twenty years ago, there were no planets known outside our solar system, and few people believed it was possible to detect tiny Earth-size planets orbiting other stars. Motivating NASA to select Kepler for launch required a confluence of the right detector technology, advances in signal processing and algorithms, and the power of super computing.

Jon Jenkins is a research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center where he conducts research on data processing and dectection algorithms for discovering transiting extrasolar planets. He is the co-investigator for data processing for the Kepler Mission, and for NASA's  TESS Mission slated for launch in 2017 to identify Earth's nearest neighbors for follow up and characterization. Dr. Jenkins received his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering, his Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Mathematics, his Master of Science degree in Electrical Engeineering and his PH.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia.

==================================

Friday, February 12  7:00pm

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park, San Jose, CA

In-Town Star Party

Description
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 2/12/2016 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri.2/12/2016 and Sat. 2/13/2016

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 2/12/2016 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 2/13/2016 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Friday February 19, 2016  7:30 pm
(Please note the date change)

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Room 5015
Foothill College

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022


"The Evolution of Planetary Landscapes from Callisto to Helene"
by Orkan M. Umurhan

Landform evolution modelling has become an important tool in interpreting the landscapes of the icy satellites of the solar system.  In this talk, I will discuss the methods that are applied to this purpose and describe its application to several interesting icy satellite bodies, including Titan, Triton, Callisto and Helene.  The talk will conclude with a preview of landform evolution modelling results applied to Pluto.

Dr. Umurhan’s research focuses on evolutionary processes both on planetary surfaces and in protoplanetary disks. He has published on a number of topics including astrophysical flows and turbulence, fundamentals of shear flow instabilities, geomorphology and landform evolution and its modelling. Dr. Umurhan joined the New Horizons Geology and Geophysics Investigation Team in June of 2013. His main role on this mission has been in providing mathematical modelling framework for the various geophysical scenarios of interest and appropriate to the Pluto system.  Dr. Umurhan regularly writes blogposts for NASA about New Horizons and he is also a co-author on a graduate level textbook on fluid dynamics for physicists due to come out this spring.




==================================




END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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