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Astronomy Events in Northern California

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EAS CALENDAR


From: Kenneth Lum

Events of Week of 08/31/2015 and Beyond


Tuesday, September 01 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler: Reaching Towards the Habitable Zone

Christopher Burke
SETI Institute

==================================

Tuesday, 09/01/15 7:00 PM

Science Buzz Cafe
189 H Street
Aqus Cafe
Petaluma, CA 94952

Mars the Planet: New Evidence of Life on Mars?
Speaker: Craig Kodros, Archaeological Explorer

Cost:
$5

==================================

Thursday, 09/03/15
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15
698 The Embarcadero
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Figuring

Math is the language, tool, and way of thinking that we all use-sometimes without even realizing it-to study quantity, structure, relationships between things, pattern, and change. Before Euler came along and invented all the notations we think of as mathematical symbols, math was mostly done with words and, occasionally, pictures. At the Exploratorium, we mostly do math with exhibits-and we're always inventing new ones. Tonight, we'll roll out some of our newest, showing you math isn't all like that high school algebra class. In doing so, we'll show you some of the simplicity, beauty, and elegance that make your mathematically inclined friends foam at the mouth and reveal some surprising ways that you can see mathematics everywhere.

Cost:
$15 General, $10 Members

==================================

Friday, 09/04/15
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Evergreen Valley College
Lecture Hall - S140, Sequoia Building
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

Free Public Astronomy Talk: How events in the skies have affected history
Key events in history have been tied (by coincidence) to astronomical events, such as comets, eclipses, and other unusual sightings in the sky. Come explore how humans have interpreted astronomy and linked it to major events in history. We will be discussing some examples of astronomical events influencing historical events.

Speaker: Professor Eric Narveson, Evergreen Valley College

There will be a free public stargazing event at the Montgomery Hill Observatory after the talk during 8 pm - 10 pm.

Parking: Free Parking in parking lot #6 for this event.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Friday, 09/04/15
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Evergreen Valley College
Lecture Hall - S140, Sequoia Building
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

How events in the skies have affected history: A Free Public Astronomy Talk

Key events in history have been tied (by coincidence) to astronomical events, such as comets, eclipses, and other unusual sightings in the sky. Come explore how humans have interpreted astronomy and linked it to major events in history. We will be discussing some examples of astronomical events influencing historical events.

Speaker: Professor Eric Narveson

Cost:
free

==================================

Friday, September 4, 2015 7PM

San Mateo County Astronomical Society
CSM Planetarium, Science Building (Bldg. 36)
College of San Mateo
1700 W. Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA

speaker Dr. Phil Marshall, Cosmologist, SLAC

Weighing Galaxies

We live in a galaxy of about a hundred billion stars: the Milky Way. How much does that weigh? Strong gravitational lenses have become an important astronomical tool; they allow us to make accurate measurements of galaxy masses, they provide a magnified view of the distant universe, and they allow us to constrain cosmological parameters.    Dr. Marshall will show how we are mapping out where the Dark Matter is, both in our local group of galaxies and further out in the depths of space. It turns that galaxies are much heavier than they look - but what could that mean for our understanding of how stars form, and what Dark Matter is?

Dr. Marshall is a research scientist at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and a member of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC). His main research interest is observational cosmology using strong gravitational lensing: weighing galaxies, measuring distances and the expansion rate of the Universe and mapping out where the mass in the Universe is. He is involved in a number of surveys to find new lenses, using both ground-based and space telescopes - including designing the strong lensing science analysis for LSST — The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope being built in Chile.

He feels communicating their science is an important part of every scientist’s job: he tries hard to reach as wide an audience as possible, in a variety of ways. He is particularly interested in talking to people about how science works: the process of enquiry, using models to understand the world, coping with uncertainty, and how knowledge grows.

Phil earned his BA and MS in Physics from the University of Cambridge in 2000, and earned his PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 2003. Since then he has worked on galaxy structure and evolution, and cosmology, in Postdoctoral Research positions at SLAC, the University of California Santa Barbara, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), and at the University of Oxford.

==================================

Fri. 09/04/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 09/04/2015 and Sat. 09/05/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/04/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/05/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Tuesday, September 08 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Direct imaging of extrasolar planets and the discovery of a young Jupiter

Bruce Machintosh
Stanford University

Be among the first to learn about an exciting new exoplanet discovery—a Jupiter-like planet called “51 Eri b” that orbits a star a 100 light years away in the constellation of Eridanus.

Using a powerful new imaging device, astronomers have espied a Jupiter-like exoplanet 100 light-years distant in the constellation of Eridanus.  Unlike most planets found around other stars, 51 Eri b has been seen directly.  The instrument employed to make the discovery has also made a spectroscopic analysis of the light reflected from the planet, and has detected gases similar to those in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

Because GPI not only images exoplanets but also spreads their light for chemical analysis, astronomers can search for such common gases as water and methane in their atmospheres. Researchers had expected to see methane in directly-imaged exoplanets based on the temperature and chemistry of these worlds, but had failed to detect these molecules in large quantities using earlier instruments.  However, the observations of 51 Eri b made with GPI have clearly revealed a methane-dominated atmosphere similar to that of Jupiter.

An extraordinarily complex instrument the size of a small car, GPI is attached to one of the world’s biggest telescopes – the 8-meter Gemini South instrument in Chile.  It began its survey of stars last year.

The host star, 51 Eri, is very young, a mere 20 million years old, and is slightly hotter than the Sun. The exoplanet 51 Eri b, whose mass is estimated to be roughly twice that of Jupiter, appears to orbit its host star at a distance 13 times greater than the Earth-Sun distance.  If placed in our own solar system, 51 Eri b’s orbit would lie between those of Saturn and Neptune.

==================================

Wednesday, 09/09/15
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Dishdash Middle Eastern Grill
181 Ranch Drive
Milpitas, CA 94063

Spaceport Development, Technologies, Services and Customers

What is a modern spaceport built for today and tomorrow?  Join spaceport development expert Ethan Chew of the Global Aerospace Regional Development Network (GARDN) for a presentation of the emerging models and technologies involved in the development of spaceport localities, services and customers. Learn about successful spaceports in development and how they help grow the economy with services such as payloading, launch, component 3D printing, computing, supply chains, shipping, rapid construction, materials reuse, market estimation, technology development and investment programs. For more information about GARDN, seehttp://gardnet.org/.

Website: http://spacesociety-sv.org/events.html

Cost:
Free

==================================

Fri. 09/11/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 09/11/2015 and Sat. 09/12/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/11/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/12/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.


==================================

Saturday, 09/12/15  07:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Galileo Rm
2nd Floor Spees Bldg
Oakland, CA 94619

Observing the high-energy universe - astronomy in the Antarctic
Speaker: Dr. Nathan Whitehorn, Postdoc Fellow, UC Berkeley, Dept of Physics

Cost:
Free

==================================

------------------------------------
END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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