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Astronomy Events in Northern California

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EAS What's Up page with Moon phases and "Bright Planet Notes"

The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse


Eastbay Astronomical Society Calendar
From: Kenneth Lum

 

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Events of Week of 01/16/2017 and Beyond
 
Tuesday, 01/17/17  12:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
1065 La Avenida
Microsoft SVC Building One Galileo Auditorium
Mountain View, CA 94043

Constraining the Evolution of a Delta Deposit on Mars from Orbit
Decades of planetary exploration have revealed widespread evidence for ancient fluvial activity on the surface of Mars, including deeply incised valleys, paleolake basins, and an extensive sedimentary rock record. Acquisition of high-resolution remote sensing data of the martian surface (e.g., images and topography) over the past 5-10 years have allowed for quantitative analysis of the large-scale sedimentary structures of martian sedimentary deposits.

In this talk, Dr. Goudge will focus on a detailed study of the stratigraphic architecture and channel deposit geometries of the Jezero crater delta deposit on Mars. Results from this study are used to reconstruct a scenario for the evolution of the Jezero crater delta and paleolake in which it formed. This delta deposit is a representative example of fluvial stratigraphy on early Mars, and these results can help to improve our understanding of ancient martian fluvial activity.

Speaker: Tim Goudge, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas, Austin

Cost:  Free

==================================

Wednesday, 01/18/17  8:00 PM

Rickshaw Stop
155 Fell St. @ Van Ness
San Francisco, CA 94102

Nerd Nite SF #80: Queer History, Gene Editing, and Gravitational Waves!

With Auld Lang Syne still reverberating in our ears, the first Nerd Nite SF of 2017 draws nigh. If your New Year’s resolution was to learn new things, meet interesting people, or kill more brain cells with beer then we have the event for you! A historian weaves a queer biography, a scientist (to the best of our knowledge, of the sane variety) manipulates genomes, and a physicist demonstrates how to listen to gravity waves. Come out for three fascinating talks, plus music, drinks, food, and your fellow nerds. Be there and be square!

“Queer Compulsions: Race, Nation, and Sexuality in the Affairs of Yone Noguchi” by Amy Sueyoshi

In the 1890s Japanese Immigrant poet Yone Noguchi - better known today as the father of acclaimed artist Isamu Noguchi - wrote torrid letters of love to Bohemian Club founder Charles Warren Stoddard, as he impregnated Leonie Gilmour and proposed marriage to Alabama’s first historian Ethel Armes who was likely a lesbian. How could same-sex sexuality, infidelity, and interracial love exist openly and acceptably at the turn of the century in the midst of anti-miscegenation and sodomy laws?

“Gene Editing: Approaching the Age of GATTACA” by Ashley Libby

Our DNA controls our lives more than we realize. It not only influences our appearance and how our bodies function, but it can also cause things to go wrong. Many diseases are genetically linked to your DNA. Now imagine being able to change that. Envision a doctor telling you that they can simply “cut out” the gene that causes a disease. While this might seems like a scene out of a science fiction novel, it is closer to reality with the discovery of a gene-editing tool called CRISPR. What is CRISPR? Why are scientists so excited about it? How would we use it? Is it really safe? Come learn about the rapidly developing field of gene editing, what genes scientists want to delete, and what we should watch out for.

“Gravity Waves, Interference, and Quantum Mechanics: Opening up new windows to the large and small world” by Holger Müller

We can actually “hear” cosmic gravitational waves - ripples in spacetime created by neutron star binary systems, black holes, and echoes from the birth of the universe, and more - with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. Holger will show with a live demo how we can use a modified laser pointer to generate audio and visualizations using laser interferometry, and will play audio from the real LIGO, while explaining what it all means.

Website: https://sf.nerdnite.com/2017/01/12/nerd-nite-sf-80-queer-history-gene-editing-and-gravitational-waves/

Cost:  $8

==================================

Thursday, 01/19/17
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

The Formation and Evolution of Binary Stars

I will present four mini-lectures. (1) Eclipsing binaries (EBs) have historically been utilized to measure the fundamental stellar relations and distances to nearby galaxies. In the current era of time-domain astronomy, I will demonstrate how increasingly larger samples of EBs provide invaluable insight into the formation, environments, and evolution of binary stars. (2) Binaries identified via eclipses, spectroscopy, interferometry, and adaptive optics each give a unique perspective of companion star properties. By combining the various surveys, a complete but complex picture of the binary star formation process begins to emerge. (3) The statistical distributions of binary stars serve as initial conditions in population synthesis studies. I will highlight the implications for the predicted rates and properties of Type Ia supernovae, compact object mergers, and sources of gravitational waves. (4) Finally, I will discuss a recently approved multi-band photometric monitoring survey of the Triangulum Galaxy M33, which, over its one square degree coverage, will rival the sensitivity and cadence of LSST. The M33 survey is designed to discover exotic types of EBs, variables, and transients pertinent to our understanding of star / planet formation, Type Ib/c supernovae, reionization, and the cosmological distance scale.

Speaker: Maxwell Moe, Univ. of Arizona

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 01/19/17  7:00 PM

Digital Arts Research Center (DARC)
UC Santa Cruz
Room 108
Santa Cruz, CA 95064\
Directions: http://danm.ucsc.edu/contact/directions

Art, Astronomy, and Exhibitions @ LASER: LEONARDO Art/Science Evening Rendezvous

LASER @ UC Santa Cruz this month complements the exhibition "Look Back in Time: Russell Crotty and Lick Observatory”.

Featuring the Speakers:

    • Claire Max on "Adaptive Optics at Lick and Beyond"
    • Garth Illingworth on "The First Billion Years: The Dawn of Galaxies"
    • Russell Crotty on "Drawing Astronomy"
    • Tony Misch on "A Keen Delight: Lick Observatory's Historical Treasure Trove”

Please join us at 6:30 pm for refreshments.

Website:  http://us4.campaign-archive2.com/?u=71558e24284a2a79d0ac44827&id=df947e73f2&e=553db46f05

Cost:  Free (metered parking)

==================================

Thursday, 01/19/17  8:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Everything Matters: Argon
Come be in your elements with Exploratorium host and scientific raconteur Ron Hipschman. Follow tales of intrigue and invention, join in dynamic demonstrations, and uncover fascinating connections between individual elements and our collective human experience.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark/1-19-2017#matter

Cost:  Free with admission to After Dark

==================================

Friday, 01/20/17  7:00 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Using your Eyes and your Camera to get the most out of Solar Eclipses
In 2017 totality only lasts for two minutes. During that time a lot happens. I will use my own experience (both good and bad) to help the participants get the most out of the eclipse experience whether you are going to just view it with your eyes or bring your portable observatory. For those who cannot attend the material I will be presenting (and more) are in the YouTube movies linked from my website.

Speaker: Rob Hawley

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, January 20, 2017
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

SJ Astronomical Assoc. In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr, San Jose, CA

• All telescopes will be set up on the sidewalk that is between the Tennis Courts and Parking Lot.
• Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 1/20/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 1/20/2016 and Sat. 1/21/2016

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 01/20/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/21/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sunday, 01/22/17
01:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: Radioactivity

Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world.

What's going on inside the nucleus of an atom? Why does it spit out radiation? Did you know that you are exposed to radioactivity every day? Learn the facts about this somewhat controversial topic.

Talks at 1:00 and 3:00.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-radioactivity-1-22-2017

Cost:  Free with admission

==================================

Monday, January 23 2017 - 12:00 pm, PST (Note different date)

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
1065 La Avenida
Microsoft SVC Building One Galileo Auditorium
Mountain View, CA 94043

Exocomets: Now you see them, now you don’t
Barry Welsh, UC Berkeley

Minor bodies such as Kuiper Belt objects, comets, and asteroids constitute the rocky and icy debris left over from the planet building phase of our solar system. The existence of reservoirs of small rocky bodies (i.e., asteroids/planetesimals) in orbits around young stellar systems is now well established, with their presence being required by current (exo)planetary formation theories. The initial proto-planetary disks that contain the reservoir of dust and gas required to form (exo)planets are short lived (<< 1 Myr) and thus the circumstellar debris disks observed around young stars of ages 10 – 50 Myr must be being continually replenished by collision and evaporation events amongst planetesimals. In such systems, the gravitation field associated with the newly formed exoplanets can potentially enable the disruption of large numbers of these kilometer-sized icy bodies into trajectories directed towards the young central star.

Present technology does not enable us to view images of these kilometer-sized infalling bodies, but the evaporation of gaseous products liberated from exocomets that occurs close to a star can potentially cause small disruptions in the ambient circumstellar disk plasma. For circumstellar disks that are viewed “edge-on” this evaporating material may be directly observed through transient (night-to-night and hour-to-hour) gas absorption features seen at rapidly changing velocities. Using high resolution spectrographs mounted to large aperture ground-based telescopes, we have discovered 15 young stars that harbor swarms of exocomets. In this lecture we briefly describe the physical attributes of comets in our own solar system and the instrumental observing techniques to detect the presence of evaporating exocomets present around stars with ages in the 10 – 100 Myr range. We note that this work has particular relevance to the dramatic fluctuations in the flux recorded towards “Tabby’s star” by the NASA Kepler Mission, that may be explained through the piling up of swarms of exocomets in front of the central star.

==================================

Monday, 01/23/17  2:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Yang-MIlls glueballs as closed bosonic strings

Speaker: Sergei Dubovsky, NYU/UC Davis

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 01/24/17
04:30 PM - 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

The Direct Detection of Gravitational Waves: Observation of the Mergers of Black Hole Binaries
Speaker: Rai Weiss, MIT

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 01/24/17
07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

Cubberley Community Theatre
4000 Middlefield Road
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Famed Geologist Walter Alvarez: A Most Improbable Journey
One in a million doesn’t even come close.

Not when we’re talking about the odds that you would happen to be alive today, on this particular planet, hurtling through space. Almost 14 billion years of cosmic history, more than 4 billion years of Earth history, and a couple million years of human history, has led to you.

This panoramic viewpoint has captured the imagination of historians and scientists alike, and together they’ve created a new field "big history"that studies the entire known past of our universe to give context to our very existence.

Famed geologist Alvarez is best known for the impact theory explaining dinosaur extinction. His unique expertise and infectious curiosity gives us a new appreciation for the incredible occurrences from the Big Bang and beyond that have led to our improbable place in the universe.

Website: http://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2017-01-24/walter-alvarez-most-improbable-journey

Cost:  $12-$22

==================================

Tuesday, 01/24/17
07:15 PM - 09:15 PM

Mount Diable Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Interactive workshop building your own equatorial sundial
Speaker: Jeff Adkins, Mount Diable Astronomical Society

Cost:  Free

==================================

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 7:30pm

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall Auditorium Rm#200
Stanford University, CA

Greetings from Stanford University's Astronomy Program:

We are happy to announce our 34th Annual Bunyan lecture will be presented on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 7:30pm by Prof. Rainer Weiss.    Please come and hear about his exciting work with gravitational waves.  Below is our link to our department's announcement with all details.  Please share with your colleagues.  The lecture is free and open to the public.

https://physics.stanford.edu/events/bunyan-lecture-2017

Professor Rainer Weiss (MIT and member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration) will present a talk entitled, "Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves."  It will cover some of the history of gravitational waves, a description of the LIGO instruments, data analysis techniques, measurement results and the prospects for the future. We believe many people will be interested in his lecture. 

Here is a link to the LIGO Scientific Collaboration: http://ligo.org/index.php

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - See more at: http://ligo.org/about.php#sthash.l0qtqHEo.dpuf Some information you might find interesting regarding our speaker and his work:
For your convenience below are links to Stanford's searchable map and Marguerite bus schedule.  If you drive, we recommend parking at the Oval and a short walk to Hewlett Teaching Center room 200. You could also ride Caltrain to Palo Alto and take The "P" Palm Drive Marguerite bus to the Oval (7:10pm from Caltrain stop will arrive at the Oval at 7:20pm).
https://transportation.stanford.edu/maps-resources-access/map
https://transportation.stanford.edu/marguerite/p#marguerite--schedule-anchor

We are happy to also inform you that we have recently uploaded several archived Bunyan lectures (including Carl Sagan's 1993 lecture) onto the Physics YouTube website that you might find interesting.
https://www.youtube.com/user/StanfordPhysics

We hope to see you there on 1/25/17 @ 7:30pm!

==================================

Wednesday, 01/25/17
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

The Monster Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy

Improvements in technology allow astronomers to use large telescopes to track the properties of stars in places where gravity overwhelms everything. By measuring the rapid orbits of stars near the center of our galaxy, Dr. Ghez and her colleagues have made the case for a supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. Ghez will report on her pioneering measurements and the unexpected results she and her team have found. Their work provides insight into how black holes grow and the role they play in their host galaxies.

Ghez is one of the world’s leading experts in observational astrophysics and heads UCLA’s Galactic Center Group. She has received numerous honors and awards including the Crafoord Prize in Astronomy, making her the first woman to receive a Crafoord in any field. Other honors include the Bakerian Medal from the Royal Society of London, a MacArthur Fellowship, and election to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. Ghez is committed to the communicating science to the general public and inspiring young girls to enter the field. Her work can be found in many public outlets, including TED Talks, NOVA’s Monster of the Milky Way, and Discovery’s Swallowed by a Black Hole.

Speaker: Andrea Ghez, UC Los Angeles

The free lecture series is sponsored by the Foothill College Astronomy Program, NASA Ames Research Center, SETI Institute and Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

Cost:  Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Thursday, 01/26/17
08:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: Radioactivity

Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world.

What's going on inside the nucleus of an atom? Why does it spit out radiation? Did you know that you are exposed to radioactivity every day? Learn the facts about this somewhat controversial topic.

Part of After Dark, which runs from 6:00 to 10:00.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark/1-26-2017

Cost:  Free with admission

==================================

Fri. 1/27/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 1/27/2017 and Sat. 1/28/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 01/27/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/28/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

END EAS CALENDAR

Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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