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Astronomy Events in Northern California

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Eastbay Astronomical Society Calendar
From: Kenneth Lum

 

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Events of Week of 10/15/2018 and Beyond

Monday, 10/15/18
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Exploring novel probes and methods for cosmology

There are still many unknowns that cosmological observations might help unveiling. Among these, the value for the sum of neutrino masses and the force driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe are some of the most interesting challenges. In this talk I will discuss a fairly new probe, the cosmic voids, and a novel method, an emulator with simulations on the fly, to extract cosmological parameters and understand the nature of neutrinos and dark energy. First, I will discuss how voids can be used as cosmological tools and in particular to extract the neutrino masses. Second, I will present a theoretical framework to describe the matter density profile around voids and the void bias, which allows to understand the void evolution, provides the structure of fitting formulae for data analysis and gives insights on the RSD analysis with voids. Finally, I will talk about the design of the new emulator we are developing. It will generate the galaxy-galaxy power spectrum in redshift space by combining fast quasi-nbody simulations (FastPM), Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling, and variance cancellation techniques to produce accurate ensemble averaged galaxy power spectra without invoking a large bill of computer hours.

Speaker: Elena Massara, CCA

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/exploring-novel-probes-and-methods-cosmology

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 10/15/18  12:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Revealing Young Planet Population from ALMA Large Program-DSHARP

Despite thousands of planets have been discovered, these planets are billions of years old and we know little about their formation processes. To understand planet formation, we need to study young planets which are still growing in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, we would like to know both the properties of each young planet and the demographics of the young planets as a single population. ALMA Large Program-DSHARP has provided us unprecedented images of 20 protoplanetary disks, each with the resolution that is the same as the famous HL Tau ALMA image. A variety of disk features have been revealed and many of them are consistent with features induced by young planets in disks. To explore the potential planet population that is responsible to these disk features, we have systematically carried out planet-disk interaction simulations including both gas and dust components. We have laid out the procedure to constrain the planet properties using disk features, and studied the potential planets in DSHARP disks. I will highlight some of the findings, including one system with remarkable agreements between the observation and theory. Finally, I will present the demographics of the derived young planet population from the DSHARP sample, compare it with the demographics of known exoplanets, and discuss its implications to the planet formation theory.

Speaker: Zhaohuan Zhu, Univ of Nevada, Las Vegas

Website: http://w.astro.berkeley.edu/tac/seminar/abstracts/zhu.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 10/15/18
04:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Sapp Center for Science Teaching and Learning
Stanford University
Room 111
Stanford, CA 94305

'No Belles' - Stanford

No Belles is a dramatic production about women scientists and the Nobel prize. Portal Theatre is a theater company based in Portland, OR, whose play "No Belles" focuses on the lives of women scientists who won Nobel Prizes and some who did not. It was performed at the Fall 2017 ACS meeting in Washington, DC, and the CA Section WCC have arranged for it to be shown in the San Francisco Bay Area to benefit and inspire young women STEM students, in particular, and be accessible to all students aspiring to become the scientists of tomorrow.

See weblink for more information about the play and tickets.

Website: https://events.stanford.edu/events/801/80102/

Cost:  Free, registration required

==================================

Monday, 10/15/18
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Alamo Drafthouse New Mission Theater
2250 Mission St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Andy Weir: From Silicon Valley to Mars

With two massive bestsellers in The Martian and Artemis, Andy Weir might be the current king of sci-fi. But only recently, Weir was a Silicon Valley programmer shopping a manuscript about an astronaut marooned on Mars. Failing to find a book deal, he published it on his website, crowdsourcing its accuracy with scientists. When readership grew, he released it on Kindle for 99 cents, the lowest price allowed. In three months it sold 35,000 copies, and Random House and Hollywood came calling. Tonight, he shares his thoughts about life and science with Inquiring Minds podcaster Kishore Hari. Book sales and signing to follow. Ticket price includes screening of "The Martian".

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/232590047606711/

Cost:  $20 Advance, $25 at door

==================================

Monday, 10/15/18  7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Exploring Our Galactic Neighborhood

It is important to know what is going on in your neighborhood, and that is also true of the immediate vicinity of our Sun in the Milky Way Galaxy. The Sun, along with our nearest stellar neighbors, is moving through giant clouds of interstellar gas and dust. Indeed, there is an interaction zone where the outward moving winds of stars push against the inward pressure of the surrounding interstellar gas. This interaction can even have important implications for the Earth and other planets. Prof. Redfield will describe what kind of astronomical objects reside in our Galactic neighborhood, how we know they are there, and why it is so important to learn all we can about the astronomical objects that share our small corner of the Galaxy.

Speaker: Seth Redfield, Wesleyan University

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/exploring-our-galactic-neighborhood

Cost:  $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 10/16/18  1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Measuring the Universe with Galaxy Clustering and Motions

I will review some recent advances in studies of large-scale structure, focusing on the latest clustering results from our VIPERS project at the ESO VLT, together with parallel development of analysis and modeling techniques. With 90,000 galaxy redshifts and multi-band photometric information, VIPERS has delivered at redshift 0.5 < z < 1.2 both cosmological measurements (as e.g. various estimates of the growth rate of structure through Redshift Space Distortions) and new insights on the evolution of galaxies within their large-scale environment at these epochs. Having the latter aspects under control allows us to investigate how well specific galaxies trace the underlying mass distribution and to reduce systematic errors in the modeling, e.g. when using RSD to test gravity. I will then conclude discussing a recent complementary result, in which forward modeling of redshift-space clustering through numerical simulations, pushing well into the non-linear regime, provides a sensitive and seemingly robust probe of General Relativity.

Speaker: Gigi Guzzo, Milan

Website: http://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/16/18
07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI Conference Center
301 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

From Cowboys to Communities: Changing the Face of Space Exploration

As humans prepare to venture once more into deep space, there is a clear need for creating new models for space exploration and expanding the roles for those who travel in space and eventually settle on other worlds, and for those on the ground whose work ensures their success.

In our first space era, astronaut heroes thrilled us with their daring exploits in the high-flying rocket-ships they rode all the way to the moon and back. Women were not invited to go along, but many were integral to the effort, an invisible space community that we’re just beginning to value and recognize, a revised and more comprehensive history that includes Hidden Figures, Rocket Girls, the Mercury 13, and more.

It’s been six decades since we first left Earth. The heyday of the space cowboy has come and gone, and the face of space exploration is overdue for a makeover. As humans prepare to venture once more into deep space, the need is clear to create new models for space exploration and to expand the roles, not only for those who travel in space and eventually settle on other worlds, but also for the ground-based scientists and technicians who are so vital to the success of any off-Earth mission.

Speaker: Dr. Jan Millsapps

Pre-registration advised

Website: https://seti.org/event/cowboys-communities-changing-face-space-exploration

Cost:  Free

==================================

Wednesday, 10/17/18  7:00 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Making the Largest-Ever 3D Maps of our Universe

The last century has seen a revolution in our understanding of the universe and our place in it. We now know that the universe is about 13.8 billion years old and is only about 5% normal matter - the stuff we’re made up of, like protons, neutrons, electrons. Uncovering the nature of the other 95%, the mysterious dark matter and even more mysterious dark energy, is one of the most important questions in fundamental physics today.

Dr. Dillon will talk about a new technique being developed at Berkeley, with collaborators around the world, using radio telescopes to make huge 3D maps of hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, to test our cosmological theories. He will explain the observational challenges being  faced and the reason why we’re building a giant array of 350 dishes, each one almost 50 feet across, in the middle of the South African desert. He will discuss how we know what we know about cosmology today and how we use radio telescopes to map out the ancient hydrogen and see the impact that the very first stars, galaxies, black holes, and maybe even dark matter had on it.

Speaker: Josh Dillon, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Wednesday, 10/17/18
07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

Tower Hall
San Jose State University
Morris Dailey Auditorium
San Jose, CA 95112

'No Belles' - San Jose

No Belles is a dramatic production about women scientists and the Nobel prize. Portal Theatre is a theater company based in Portland, OR, whose play "No Belles" focuses on the lives of women scientists who won Nobel Prizes and some who did not. It was performed at the Fall 2017 ACS meeting in Washington, DC, and the CA Section WCC have arranged for it to be shown in the San Francisco Bay Area to benefit and inspire young women STEM students, in particular, and be accessible to all students aspiring to become the scientists of tomorrow.

See weblink for more information about the play and tickets.

Website: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3612199

Cost:  Free, registration required

==================================

Thursday, 10/18/18
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Learning about Black Hole and Galaxy Co-evolution using the “COSMOS”

Observations indicate that supermassive black holes (SMBHs, 10**6-10**9 Msun) dwell at the centers of most local galaxies. Scaling relations between SMBH mass and several large-scale properties of the host galaxies point to a co-ordindated growth of galaxies and their central engines over cosmic time: they "co-evolve". Who is the leading actor on the the cosmic stage: the black hole or the galaxy? Is black hole activity triggering star-formation or suppressing it? Viceversa, does the galaxy control the black hole growth? How long their relationship has been going on? Observational works to address these questions give controversial results. In this talk I will present my work focusing on SMBH growth mechanisms, accretion and mergers, to understand these processes, and their signatures at high redshift and for faint sources. I will use the extraordinarily rich multiwavelength dataset of the Cosmic Evolutionary Survey (COSMOS), focusing on the highest energy data available, the X-ray ones. These data provide us with a unique and powerful tool to find and study obscured accreting SMBHs in the distant Universe.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/learning-about-black-hole-and-galaxy-co-evolution-using-cosmos

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/18/18  4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Dynamics of the Local Group in the Era of Precision Astrometry

Speaker: Gurtina Besla​, Arizona

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/18/18
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Extraterrestrial Nightlife

Explore the mysteries beyond our solar system with a night dedicated to the search for extraterrestrials. Join experts from the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View for fascinating talks on exoplanets and life beyond Earth.

Meet members of the Kepler, K2, and TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) missions and learn how coronagraph telescopes help them capture images of exoplanets.

Travel back through time and space with VR experiences presented by Underground Engine, a collective of artists, scientists, and technologists. Meet researchers from the UC Berkeley SETI Research Center and METI who are actively leading the search for extraterrestrial intelligence with interstellar communications and messaging.

No space-themed NightLife would be complete without a visit to the planetarium, where you’ll catch an extra-special screening of “Waiting for Contact,” a live planetarium show exploring the what-ifs of finding extraterrestrial life.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/extraterrestrial-nightlife

Cost:  $15 General, $12 Members

==================================

Thursday, 10/18/18
06:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Michaels at Shoreline
2960 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA 94043

Tales from the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Protection System Development' (or, 'Try Not to Panic When Your Heatshield Material Disappears’)

In 2012, the entry vehicle for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was the largest and heaviest vehicle flown to another planet, designed to be able to withstand the largest heat fluxes in the Martian atmosphere ever attempted. The heatshield material that had been successfully used for all previous Mars missions had been baselined in the design, but during the development and qualification testing demonstrated catastrophic and unexplained failures. With only 10 months remaining before the original launch date, the TPS team led by NASA Ames designed and implemented a first-ever tiled, ablative heatshield. Highlights from MSL of the testing difficulties and innovations required to execute a new heatshield design will be presented, along with a sneak peak of the Mars 2020 mission.

Speaker: Helen H Hwant, NASA Ames

Please RSVP by Oct. 11, because prices will go up after that day!

Website: http://aiaa-sf.org/event/dinner-meeting-with-helen-hwang/

Cost:  $35 General, $25 Members, $15 Students

==================================

Friday, 10/19/18  7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

The Basics of Astrophotography, Part III: USB Camera Planetary, Solar and Lunar Imaging

The presentation will give an introduction to USB camera based planetary, solar and lunar imaging. Amateurs realized the potential of digital video astronomy for 'Lucky Imaging' when the first simple PC webcams entered the consumer market. Quickly an ecosystem evolved, many individuals contributed and turned the devices made for web video chats into astronomical cameras. What followed was amazing software development also by amateurs and free for all that turned video clips into high quality planetary images. We are going to learn how the technology evolved into using industrial computer vision cameras and now dedicated high end cameras made for astronomy. The presentation will show how we as amateurs can produce planetary, lunar and solar images and time lapse animations of astounding quality.

Speaker: Gert Gootschalk

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, October 20, 2018
7:45 PM to 9:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Assoc. In-Town Star Party 
Houge Park 
3972 Twilight Dr 
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 10/19/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@... or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 10/19/2018 and Sat. 10/20/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 10/19/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/20/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/20/18
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street) 
San Francisco, CA 94111

Earthquakes: How, Why - and What to Do

To mark both the 29th anniversary week of the 6.9-magnitude Loma Prieta earthquake (October 17, 1989) and Earth Science Week (October 14 - 21), join us for a morning of hands-on science activities and a lively discussion about earthquakes with science educator and author Cary Sneider (Jake and the Quake) and science education advocate Penny Noyce.  

TODAY’S SCHEDULE
Spaghetti Resonance
10:30 a.m.
Understand resonance, the phenomenon behind earthquakes, with a little help from spaghetti.

A Discussion with Cary Sneider and Penny Noyce
10:45 a.m.
Sneider and Noyce discuss Jake and the Quake, a tale of science exploration and adventure. Hear what inspired Sneider to write it after the Loma Prieta earthquake, how both Sneider and Noyce came to pursue careers in STEM education, and how to prepare for the Bay Area’s next big one. 

"Whose Fault Is It?"
11:30 a.m.
Join us for a whodunit game in which participants form the carriers, detectors, and secret source of earthquake waves, and in the process learn basic principles of seismology.

Book Signing and Activities
Noon  12:30 p.m.
Sneider will sign copies of Jake and the Quake, available for purchase.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/event-earthquakes

Cost:  Free with admission

==================================

Saturday, 10/20/18  11:00 AM

Genetics and Plant Biology Building
UC Berkeley
Room 100
Berkeley, CA 94720

A shaky anniversary: Lessons learned since the October 21, 1868 Hayward earthquake

In 1868, a destructive earthquake ruptured along the Hayward fault in the Eastern Bay Area, which was then referred to as the “Great San Francisco earthquake”. It lost that name to the much larger 1906 earthquake on the San Andreas fault across the Bay.

During the last 150 years, much research has been carried out on the rate and nature of slip and earthquakes on the Hayward fault to better understand its seismic hazard. It is now understood to have been the source of more than ten large earthquakes in the last 2000 years (spaced on average about 150 years apart!), but it also exhibits significant slow fault creep all along its surface trace, including at the Cal Memorial stadium. Modeling of space geodetic data allowed us to determine the distribution of currently locked and creeping portions of the fault zone deep in the earth, and thus better predict where exactly earthquake slip will occur in the future.

In 1868, damage was severe in Hayward, San Francisco and nearby communities and 30 lives were lost. Since then the population of the Bay Area has grown from ~260,000 to over 7 million and close to $2 trillion of residential and commercial properties are at risk from a future Hayward fault earthquake.. The bad news is that the research shows that the Hayward fault is now ready to have another earthquake of the size of the 1868 event. The good news is that much progress has been made to prepare for and improve the resilience of our communities to inevitable future earthquakes on the Hayward and other hazardous faults in the Bay Area.

Speaker: Roland Burgmann, UC Berkeley

Website: http://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/oct-20-hayward-anniversary/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/20/18
10:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Laser-Plasma Accelerators: Riding the Wave to the Next Generation X-Ray Light Sources

Particle accelerators have been revolutionizing discoveries in science, medicine, industry and national security for over a century. An estimated 30,000 particle accelerators are currently active around the world. In these machines, electromagnetic fields accelerate charged particles to velocities nearing the speed of light. Although their scientific appeal will remain evident for many decades, one limitation of the current generation of machines is their tremendous size and expense. This presentation, scientists will explore how the use of plasma may serve as a more sustainable way to reduce the size of accelerators and revolutionize applications in medicine, industry, and basic sciences.

Speaker: Felicie Albert, National Ignition Facility; Dan Burns, Los Gatos High School Teacher

Free for high school students.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/events/events-listing/science-on-saturdays/

Cost:  Free with admission

==================================

Saturday, 10/20/18
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

City Star Parties - Exploratorium
Pier 17
Green Street
San Francisco, CA 94111

City Star Party @ The ExplOratorium

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/event/san-francisco-city-star-party-53/?instance_id=1350

Cost:  Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/20/18
09:15 PM - 11:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM's very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 10/22/18
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Emission-line galaxies in the era of cosmological surveys

Cosmological surveys in the next decade will contain multiwavelength information of billions of galaxies. The challenges ahead are to distinguishing between different cosmological scenarios and/or gravity models and track accurately the build-up and formation history of galaxies. In this scenario, the role of galaxy formation is enhanced by the varied selection criteria of future surveys. Most future ground surveys, such as DESI, 4MOST, PFS and J-PAS, and space missions like Euclid and WFIRST are designed to target the so-called emission-line galaxies (ELGs). ELGs are abundant at high redshifts, and their distances can be precisely measured by identifying narrow strong emission lines in their spectra. However, there is still much to learn about their physical properties and the way they trace the matter distribution of the Universe. In this talk I will review recent progress characterizing the properties of different populations of ELGs over a broad redshift range. I will discuss galaxy formation effects that are crucial for modeling their clustering, especially in redshift space. Capturing these effects could thus result in tighter cosmological constraints and, ultimately, an optimal exploitation of future cosmological surveys.

Speaker: Alvaro Orsi (Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon - CEFCA)
:
Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/emission-line-galaxies-era-cosmological-surveys

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 10/22/18  12:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Observational constraints on the structure of gamma-ray burst jets and lessons from GW170817 

Motivated by GW170817 we examine observational constraints on the angular structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets. First, the relatively narrow observed distribution of the early X-ray afterglow to prompt gamma-ray energy ratio implies that at any angle that gamma-rays are emitted the Lorentz factor must be large. Specifically, the Lorentz factor of gamma-ray emitting material cannot drop rapidly with angle, and must be Gamma(theta)>50 even if there are angles for which the gamma-ray emitted energy is lower by three orders of magnitude compared to the jet core. Second, jets with an angular structure of the gamma-ray emission that over-produce events with a gamma-ray luminosity below the peak of the observed luminosity function are ruled-out.. This eliminates models in which the gamma-ray energy angular distribution isn't sufficiently steep and the Lorentz factor distribution isn't sufficiently shallow. Furthermore, models with a steep structure (e.g. Gaussian) which are detected away from the jet core generate afterglow light-curves that were never observed. Thus even if the jet kinetic energy distribution drops continuously with latitude, efficient gamma-ray emission seems to be restricted to material with Gamma>50 and is most likely confined to a narrow region around the core. Comparing GRB170817 with the regular population of short GRBs (sGRBs), we show that an order unity fraction of NS mergers result in sGRB jets that breakout of the surrounding ejecta, that their luminosity function must be intrinsically peaked and that sGRB jets are typically narrow with opening angles ~ 0.1 rad. Finally, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to examine models for the structure and efficiency of the prompt emission in off-axis sGRBs. We find that only a small fraction, 0.01-0.1, of NS mergers detectable by LIGO/VIRGO in GWs is expected to be also detected in prompt gamma-rays, and GW170817-like events are very rare.

Speaker: Paz Beniamini, George Washington Univ.

Website: http://w.astro.berkeley.edu/tac/seminar/abstracts/beniamini.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 10/22/18  7:00 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

Wonderfest: Opening NASA's Mission Control

From the iconic mission control center in Houston that guided astronauts to the Moon, to the control centers for robotic explorers that extend our senses to the solar system and beyond, mission controlserves as the nerve center for decisions, planning, science, command, and control for our journeys into space. Centers of technical excellence, and also symbols of our explorations, mission control has evolved with time, technology, and new missions.. Of course, cathode ray tubes have given way to flat screens and touch screens. But has mission operations fundamentally changed from the glory days of Apollo? The closed world of mission control is starting to open, with open data and open-source software projects that allow anyone - citizen scientists and engineers - to participate.

Speaker: Jay Trimble, NASA Ames

Website: http://wonderfest.org/opening-nasas-mission-control-oct-22/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/23/18
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 102/103
Physics and Astrophysics Building
Stanford University
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Two Astrophysics Lectures
Debris Disks and the Mystery of AU Mic

Speaker: Eugene Chiang, UC Berkeley

Black hole jets in galaxy clusters as common origins of highest-energy particles

Speaker: Ke Fang, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/chiang-debris-disks-and-mystery-au-mic-fang-black-hole-jets-galaxy-clusters-common-origins

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/23/18
04:30 PM - 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Visiting Newton's Atelier before the Principia, 1679-1684
Stanford Physics/Applied Physics Colloquium

Speaker: Prof. Michael Nauenberg of UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/visiting-newtons-atelier-principia-1679-1684

Cost:  Free

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Tues. 10/23/2018  7:15 PM - 9:05 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker:  Professor Bradac, UC Davis

Topic:  Early Galaxy Formation

Website: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=86507

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Wednesday, 10/24/18
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

Bechtel Engineering Center Sibley Auditorium
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

From the Accelerating Universe to Accelerating Science

Twenty years ago, astronomers were astonished to learn from observations of exploding stars that cosmic expansion is speeding up. We attribute this to a mysterious “dark energy” that pervades the universe and makes up 70% of it. Scientists are working in many ways to learn more about the nature of dark energy, but our reservoir of ignorance is deep. This talk will summarize the present state of knowledge and look ahead to new ways to use infrared observations of supernovae to improve our grip on dark energy. Accelerating scientific discovery is a mission of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Professor Kirshner will illustrate some of the ways we do that at Berkeley and beyond.

Speaker: Robert Kirshner, Harvard

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/pubaff.html?event_ID=120232&date=2018-10-24

Cost:  Free

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Thursday, 10/25/18  8:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street) 
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Science Fiction

Alternatives to our current reality begin with imagination. Explore creative visions of tomorrow, reflect on imagined futures past, and encounter science fiction turned fact at Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman.

Part of After Dark, 6:00 pm - 10:00 PM

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark/october-25-2018#

Cost:  $17.95 advance, $19.95 at the door

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Friday, 10/26/18
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Observational constraints on the structure of gamma-ray burst jets and lessons from GW170817

Motivated by GW170817 we examine observational constraints on the angular structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets. First, the relatively narrow observed distribution of the early X-ray afterglow to prompt gamma-ray energy ratio implies that at any angle that gamma-rays are emitted the Lorentz factor must be large. Specifically, the Lorentz factor of gamma-ray emitting material cannot drop rapidly with angle, and must be Gamma(theta)>50 even if there are angles for which the gamma-ray emitted energy is lower by three orders of magnitude compared to the jet core. Second, jets with an angular structure of the gamma-ray emission that over-produce events with a gamma-ray luminosity below the peak of the observed luminosity function are ruled-out.. This eliminates models in which the gamma-ray energy angular distribution isn't sufficiently steep and the Lorentz factor distribution isn't sufficiently shallow. Furthermore, models with a steep structure (e.g. Gaussian) which are detected away from the jet core generate afterglow light-curves that were never observed. Thus even if the jet kinetic energy distribution drops continuously with latitude, efficient gamma-ray emission seems to be restricted to material with Gamma>50 and is most likely confined to a narrow region around the core. Comparing GRB170817 with the regular population of short GRBs (sGRBs), we show that an order unity fraction of NS mergers result in sGRB jets that breakout of the surrounding ejecta, that their luminosity function must be intrinsically peaked and that sGRB jets are typically narrow with opening angles ~ 0.1 rad. Finally, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to examine models for the structure and efficiency of the prompt emission in off-axis sGRBs. We find that only a small fraction, 0.01-0.1, of NS mergers detectable by LIGO/VIRGO in GWs is expected to be also detected in prompt gamma-rays, and GW170817-like events are very rare.

Speaker: Paz Beniamini (George Washington University)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observational-constraints-structure-gamma-ray-burst-jets-and-lessons-gw170817

Cost:  Free

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Friday, 10/26/18
06:30 PM - 08:00 PM

Scarlet City Espresso Bar
3960 Adeline Street
Emeryville, CA 94608

Grounds for Science: Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation

Awesome cutting-edge science talks with UC Berkeley graduate students, science trivia, locally roasted coffee, pinball, and more! Join Micah Brush (Physics) and Wren Suess (Astronomy) to find out how we are trying to learn the cosmic secrets of dark matter and galaxy formation.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/grounds-for-science/

Cost:  Free

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Fri. 10/26/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@... or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 10/26/2018 and Sat. 10/27/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 10/26/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 10/27/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/27/18
01:30 PM - 03:00 PM

Sunset Branch SF Public Library
1305 8th Ave
At Irving
San Francisco, CA 94122

The Universe Story: From the Big Bang to Today

Join local author Betty-Ann Kissilove in a group reading of Great Ball of Fire! A Poetic Telling of the Universe Story. For readers from 8 to 80, this beautifully illustrated book tells in verse the story of our universe, from the Big Bang to the formation and emergence of life on Earth in the seas & on land, reptiles, birds, mammals and the first humans, repeated extinctions, and the rise of humans. Experience the awe and wonder of science, as we gain perspective on our origins and place in the universe, journeying through the 13.8 billion years from the Big Bang to the present - for we too are parts of this unfolding story. The book’s website is: greatballoffirethebook.com.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/the-universe-story-from-the-big-bang-to-today/

Cost:  Free

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Saturday, 10/27/18
02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Berkeley Public Library
2090 Kittredge
Berkeley, CA 94704

Extremophiles: Grasping an Understanding of Life in the Universe

Are we alone in the Universe? How did we get here? What does a giraffe have in common with a mosquito? What makes extremophiles extreme? Who’s to say? Join us for an exciting discussion of these and many other questions around understanding the survival of life in the Universe with Dr. Felisa Wolfe-Simon. Currently working with wild fermentation, she is a noted biochemist, astrobiologist, former NASA fellow and Department of Energy researcher as well as professional musician.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/extremophiles-grasping-an-understanding-of-life-in-the-universe/

Cost:  Free

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Saturday, 10/27/18
07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Black holier than thou!

I will explain how supermassive black holes are the root cause of a wide range of phenomena seen in galaxies and I will point out examples of these things that you can see with your own telescope.

Speaker: Martin Gaskell, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/254769234/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Sunday, October 28, 2018
12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Houge Park 
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

This very low-key, flea market-like event. You can make your underused astronomy gear available to the local astronomy community, and make a couple bucks while you're at it. If you are looking for gear, come by and see what's available.

The swap meet will be held from 12 noon until about 3pm, depending on how quickly things slow down.

Details are posted at the link below. http://www.sjaa.net/swap-meet/

And finally, remember that this is a service to the local astronomy community.

Donations of 10% of sales to the SJAA are suggested.

Website:  https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/243776874/

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Sunday, 10/28/18
01:00 PM - 04:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street) 
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: Science Fiction Turned Fact

Science fiction has predicted many things. Some have come true (think touch screens, submarines, bionic limbs), others, not so much - or at least, not yet. If you’ve ever wondered where your flying car or rocket belt is, or why you don’t yet have a robot servant, find out at Full-Spectrum Science.

Presentations at 1:00 and 3:00.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/fss/10-28-18

Cost:  Free with Admission to the Exploratorium

==================================

Sunday, 10/28/18
02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Alameda Free Library
1550 Oak St
Alameda, CA 94501
Wonderfest: Precision Physics in Search of the Dark Sector

The so-called “fine-structure constant” is a deeply important number in physics. It describes the strength of the electromagnetic force between fundamental particles. This means, among countless other things, that it gauges the interaction between all the atoms and molecules in our bodies. Of the fine-structure constant, physicist Max Born said, “The explanation of this number must be the central problem of natural philosophy.” Modern measurements of the fine-structure constant reach a precision of 0.2 parts per billion. This allows us to test the celebrated Standard Model of Particle Physics at unprecedented levels. It also allows us to look for new particles and forces arising from the “dark sector”, the enormous world of undiscovered particles that makes up dark matter and dark energy. Our speaker is Dr. Holger Müller, Associate Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/precision-physics-in-search-of-the-dark-sector/

Cost:  Free

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Messages in this topic (1)
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________________________________________________________________________
2. Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace
   Posted by: "Ken Lum" lum40@comcast.net p253a457s2001
   Date: Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:57 am ((PDT))

Sat Oct 20, 2018
11:00 am - 11:00 pm

College of San Mateo
1700 W. Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA 94402  

Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace

A day of learning and fun for young and young at heart, for every age from 2 to 92, with planetarium shows, science workshops, astronomical observations, Makerspace activities, keynote speaker, fire technology and public safety demos, and more.

The events culminate in a key note lecture at 7:30PM in the Bay View Dining Room by Ron Hipschman, host and lecturer for the Exploratorium. The title of Ron's talk is "Science Fiction - Science Fact”.

Website: https://calendar.collegeofsanmateo.edu/events/index.php?com=detail&eID=21537

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END EAS CALENDAR

Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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