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Astronomy Events in Northern California


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Eastbay Astronomical Society Calendar
From: Kenneth Lum

 

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Events of Week of 09/09/2019 and Beyond

Monday, 09/09/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as "assembly bias," severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.

Speaker: Philip Mansfield, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/why-do-dark-matter-haloes-die-together-causes-halo-assembly-bias-galaxy-masses

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 09/09/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture Series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Mapping the Universe: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. SDSS will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art.

Speaker: Juna Kollmeier, Carnegie Institution for Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/mapping-the-universe-the-sloan-digital-sky-survey

Cost:  $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 09/10/19  1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses 

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as "assembly bias," severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.
Speaker: Phil Mansfield, Chicago

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/10/19
07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Nobel Prize: Blessing or Curse?

Scientists can spend theirentire career on a single idea, or elaborate experiment, and never find anything new. But if they make a significant breakthrough and discover what they have been looking for, they can win the ultimate prize: the Nobel Prize.

Is the Nobel Prize, and any other high-profile recognition, a valid indicator of being an excellent scientist? In their ambition to pursue the Nobel gold, are scientists deceived by galactic mirages? Does the Nobel Prize hamper scientific progress by encouraging speed and competition while punishing inclusivity, collaboration, and innovation?

To discuss these provocative ideas, we invited two astronomers whose life and career have been closely connected with the Nobel Prize. Brian Keating, Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of California, San Diego, was a member of the BICEP2, a cosmology telescope that was thought to have witnessed the Big Bang in 2014. In his book, “Losing the Nobel Prize,” Brian tells the inside story of the BICEP2's detection and the ensuing scientific drama. Alex Filippenko, Professor of Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, was the only person to have been a member of both teams that revealed the accelerating expansion of the Universe..  This groundbreaking discovery led to the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for the teams’ leaders.

The scientists will describe their experiences in the fast-paced field of cosmology and whether the idea that their research could lead to a Nobel Prize influenced their work. They’ll also share their thoughts on the pursuit of fame and the question of ethics in modern science.

Panel: Alex Filippenko, UC Berkeley; Brian Keating, UC San Diego, moderated by Seth Shostak, SETI

Website: https://seti.org/event/nobel-prize-blessing-or-curse

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Observations and modelling of gamma-ray flares in blazars

Speaker: Manuel Meyer

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observations-and-modelling-gamma-ray-flares-blazars

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: Quantum Worlds

Quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in science. (Bear in mind: theory is as good as it gets in science!) Still, physicists themselves admit that they don't fully understand the quantum world. Caltech physicist and New York Times best-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way to understand the mysteries of the quantum world ... of quantum worlds.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/quantum-worlds/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 and Sat. 09/14/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/14/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 09/14/19
01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Sean Carroll: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Space-Time

Quantum mechanics is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in physics, yet physicists themselves readily admit that they don't understand it. But Caltech physicist and New York Timesbest-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way of understanding the mysteries of the quantum world.

This event was rescheduled from July 16.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sean-carroll-quantum-worlds-and-the-emergence-of-space-time-tickets-63771484226?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost:  $22 General, $15 Member, $8 Student

==================================

Saturday,  09/14/19  7:30pm-Note change in time

Peninsual Astronomical Society
Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Rd.
Los Altos, CA

"Getting the Astronomy Right in a Novel”

NORM SPERLING

Website:  http://www.pastro.org/dnn/

==================================

Saturday, 09/14/19  8:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Exploring Pluto, Charon & the outer reaches of the solar system

In 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew past icy Pluto and Charon and sent back the first images of these objects in the furthest outskirts of our solar system. I will review what we now know about Pluto and Charon, and how the study of these bodies has evolved. I'll also discuss the images received over the New Year from the much smaller icy object Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Francis Nimmo

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/264143602/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Sunday, 09/15/19
04:30 PM - 09:00 PM

USS Hornet
707 W Hornet Ave
Alameda, CA 94501

AIAA-SF Annual Banquet celebrating 50th anniversary of Apollo 11

This year, we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 by hosting our annual banquet on the USS Hornet, the aircraft carrier that picked up the crew of Apollo 11 from the Pacific Ocean. During this event, we will have a buffet style dinner in the ship’s officers wardroom, a talk about the Apollo 11 Earth Landing System given by Anthony Smith, an engineer who was directly involved in its development, an awards session, and finally there will be a special Apollo 11 themed guided tour aboard the ship, including a special exhibit on the same theme.

This talk will consist of two main parts. The first part focuses on the pre-Apollo history, and gives a 10-year timespan overview of several milestones of the space program up to, and including, Apollo 11. The second part elaborates on the personal experiences of the speaker by means of a pre-recorded interview which was made for the Hornet Museum Archives. There will be an opportunity for Q&A at the end of the presentation.

Space is limited and prices go up after 9/8.

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/aiaa-banquet-2019/

Cost:  $19.00 - $49.00

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

A 2020s Vision of CMB Lensing

The field of CMB lensing is somewhere akin to where measurements of the primary CMB itself were 15 years ago; we have detected it's there and measured some scales to moderate significance, but the exciting era of deep precision measurements is just on the horizon. Over the coming decade, CMB lensing (the distortion of the CMB photons by gravitational lensing due to the matter along the CMB photon's paths) will precisely probe the distribution of matter in the universe out to high red shifts. It will also allow us to remove lensing B-mode polarization, which will be crucial to potentially detecting primordial gravitational waves from the Big Bang. However, perhaps surprisingly given the important role CMB lensing will play, how to fully extract all of the lensing information from precision CMB data is an open question, as the lensing reconstruction is a difficult high-dimensional non-linear problem. In this talk, I'll provide a review of CMB lensing science aimed at non-experts. I'll also describe the methods we have been developing to perform this optimal extraction, which are rooted in Bayesian statistics, machine learning, and modern optimization and sampling algorithms.

Speaker: Marius Millea, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/2020s-vision-cmb-lensing

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: From the Weak Scale to the Planck Scale

While supersymmetry remains an interesting and important extension of the Standard Model of particle interactions, it experimental verification remains elusive. There are many motivations for supersymmetry, many of which center on the notion of Grand Unification. However, motivations for supersymmetry do not necessarily point to weak scale supersymmetry. I will review the prospects for weak scale supersymmetry concentrating on the opportunity for the discovery of supersymmetric dark matter. I will also look at the possibility of that the scale of supersymmetry is much higher (above the inflationary scale) and perhaps as high as the Planck scale.

Speaker: Keith Olive, University of Minnesota

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190916/supersymmetry-and-dark-matter-from-the-weak-scale-to-the-planck-scale

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

TBA
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Technosignatures: What Are They, And How Might We Find Them?: Jill Tarter at the Berkeley Forum

Arthur C. Clarke's third law states that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." Since 1960, SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence) researchers have been searching for that ‘magic’ in the form of radio, and now optical, electromagnetic signals.. These searches need to continue and grow utilizing the exponentially increasing capabilities of computing, but within the SETI field, we’ve always reserved the right to get smarter. In 2014, Karl Schroeder (Canadian futurist and science fiction author) suggested a variant of the Third Law; Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from Nature. What opportunities does this increased scope of the Third Law offer to our own 21 st century search for life beyond Earth? As we design and implement the next generations of ground and space based observatories, some of whose primary goals are the imaging of exoplanets and the spectroscopic analysis of their atmospheres, we should consider how we might distinguish between the byproducts of microbes and mathematicians. We are vigorously discussing/debating the right instruments to develop and fly to find biosignatures - how can we find the technosignatures of the mathematicians?

Speaker: Jill Tarter, SETI , emeritus

See weblink to register

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astrobiologist-and-astronomer-jill-tarter-at-the-berkeley-forum-tickets-71448304803?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/17/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Planning for JWST Observations

Speaker: Becky Canning, KIPAC

TBA

Speaker: Regina Caputo, NASA Goddard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/canning-planning-jwst-observations-caputo-tbd

Cost:  Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/18/19  7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exoplanets Across the Sky: the View from TESS

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA space mission that is tasked with tracking the brightness variations of stars across nearly the entire 360 degree expanse of the sky, in its two year planned mission. In operation for the past year, it has already made numerous new discoveries, including comets, supernovae, and exoplanets. TESS is finding small, rocky planets around stars that are bright enough to view with binoculars, or even the naked eye. These are prime targets for future studies of exoplanetary composition and atmospheres. In this talk I will present some of the many TESS discoveries to date and discuss ongoing efforts to conduct follow-up studies from the ground.

Speaker: Ann Marie Cody, NASA Ames and SETI

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019  7:00 p.m.
Show & Tell starts at 7:30 pm

Tri-Valley Stargazers
Unitarian Universalist Church
1893 N. Vasco Rd.,
Livermore, CA

Speaker: Kenji Ozawa

Spacecraft Thermal Control

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park 
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 and Sat. 09/21/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/21/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, September 21, 2019  7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Galileo Room
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Join us for dinner with the speaker beforehand at 5:30 PM at Hunan Yuan Restaurant!
4100 Redwood Road, #11

Origin of the Elements: A Story of Stellar Nucleosynthesis
by Molly Wakeling, UC Berkeley

ABOUT THE TALK:
Where do we come from? A fundamental question of the human species. We might not know the answer, but we do know how the atoms that make up us, the sun, the planets, and the stars were made. Many schoolchildren know that the sun is a star made of hydrogen and helium gas – much like the early universe. But where did that original hydrogen and helium come from? And what about the rest of the periodic table of elements?

The story of our chemical makeup is the story of nucleosynthesis. Big Bang nucleosynthesis generated the seeds of hydrogen and helium within the first 20 minutes of the universe’s existence. Long after that, the first stars formed, where a process slightly more complicated than you might think produces some of the heavier elements. Stars can only produce atoms up to iron, however – the rest require far more energetic processes.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Saturday, 09/21/19  7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Movie Night on Mt. Tam: The Martian

2015 film starring Matt Damon depicts the struggles of an astronaut left behind on Mars as he awaits rescue. Post-screening discussion by Jeffrey Silverman of Science VS Cinema

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost:  Free

==================================

Saturday, September 21
Sunset: 7:09 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon.  Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free.  All ages are welcome.  If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share!  Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset..  In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled.  Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice. 

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================



END EAS CALENDAR
 
 
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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