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Astronomy Events in Northern California


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Eastbay Astronomical Society Calendar
From: Kenneth Lum

 

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Events of Week of 02/11/2019 and Beyond

Monday, 02/11/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

The Connection between Large Scale Structure and the Cosmic Microwave Background

Cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons were initially released at recombination, less than half a million years after the big bang. In the nearly 14 billion years since, they have been scattered and lensed by intervening structure, imprinting a complex pattern of additional intensity and polarization anisotropies onto maps of the microwave sky. These CMB maps therefore contain a wealth of information about the large scale structure (LSS) of the universe. I will first review the main physical effects through which LSS affects the CMB and the many outstanding questions in cosmology and galaxy formation that we will be able to answer in the coming decade with CMB observations. I will then describe the crucial step of building realistic computational models that incorporate these effects, based on existing theoretical models and observations, directly into the analysis pipelines for upcoming CMB experiments such as the Simons Observatory and CMB-S4. Along the way I will emphasize synergies between CMB experiments and galaxy surveys such as DESI and LSST. I will end with the computational and modeling challenges that lie ahead for making the most of LSS data at multiple wavelengths.
Speaker: Marcelo Alvarez, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/connection-between-large-scale-structure-and-cosmic-microwave-background

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 02/11/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Importance of Small-Scale Structure in the CGM and its Impact on Galaxy Evolution
Theoretical Astrophysics Seminar

Speaker: Cameron Hummels, Caltech

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 02/11/19
03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LHC accelerator: from design to operation and future plans (High Luminosity LHC project and FCC)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27 km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994 after 10 years of prototyping of the main accelerator components, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2010. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time.

Since the start-up of the machine, there has been two successful physics runs with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments at 7 and 8 TeV centre of mass energy for the Run 1 (2010-2012) and at 13 TeV for the Run 2 (2015-2018).

A full exploitation of the LHC including an upgrade of the accelerator and detectors (High Luminosity LHC) is defined for the next two decades. An intensive program of R&D was launched to achieve the High Luminosity challenges: superconducting high field magnets, superconducting RF compact cavities, collimators, superconducting lines, radiation hard power converters …

CERN is also initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project post-LHC centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres (FCC: Future Circular Colliders).

The colloquium will recall the main LHC technical developments. Then the R&D program and the plans for the full exploitation of the LHC will be discussed and finally the FCC study will be presented.

Speaker: Frederick Bordry, CERN

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/lhc-accelerator-design-operation-and-future-plans-high-luminosity-lhc-project-and-fcc

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 02/11/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

New Approaches to Looking for E.T.

For six decades, a tiny group of scientists has probed the cosmos for evidence of aliens. Is this an endless quest, or could we soon learn of other beings in the nearby universe? We’ll discuss the latest efforts to uncover the extraterrestrials, as well as some disturbing ideas that could change the way we hunt for cosmic company. Also, what happens if we do detect someone or something out there? Would that radically change our own society, or merely be an interesting story for a week or two?

Speaker: Seth Shostak, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/new-approaches-to-looking-for-et

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 02/12/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Cross-correlations at all scales: correlating optical and CMB surveys to probe physics at very large and very small scales

CMB surveys are correlated with optical imaging surveys as a result of secondary anisotropies and foreground emission. In this talk, I will illustrate with two examples how we can exploit these correlations to probe physics across a huge range of length scales. First, by cross-correlating galaxy surveys with measurements of gravitational lensing of the CMB, we can tighten cosmological constraints from galaxy surveys and improve their robustness to systematic errors. Second, and somewhat surprisingly, correlations between optical surveys and CMB surveys can provide insight into the outskirts of planetary systems, potentially enabling the first direct detection of Oort clouds and improving our chances of detecting Planet 9.

Speaker: Eric Baxter, Penn State Univ.

Website: http://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 02/13/19
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Probing Physics of Inflation and Neutrino properties with CMB measurements from the BICEP/Keck Array and South Pole Telescope
Speaker: Kimmy Wu, Kavli INstitute for Cosmological Physics

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/panofsky-candidate-talk-probing-physics-inflation-and-neutrino-properties-cmb-measurements

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 02/13/19
07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

The Future of NASA Space Telescopes - What to Look for in the Next Generation

What should we expect from the next generation of space telescopes? What key scientific questions will they help answer? Do we have the technology we need to operate them in 20-30 years?

To address these issues, NASA selected four large space mission concepts to study and consider as possible future Large Strategic Science Missions. Of the NASA astrophysics division missions, these tend to be the most expensive, but also have the greatest capacity.

Three of those space telescopes got the attention of the SETI Institute because of their potential to answer the question, “Are We Alone?”

• The Origins Space Telescope (Origins) is a large cooled infrared space telescope with higher sensitivity and better angular resolution than any prior observatory accessing similar wavelengths. Among its many science objectives covering the first stars to life, Origins could help scientists understand the abundance and availability of water for habitable planets, and could look forbiosignatures on potentially habitable worlds transiting low-mass stars.

• The Large UV Optical Infrared Surveyor (or LUVOIR) is a general-purpose observatory; its key science goal is to characterize a wide range of exoplanets, including those that might be habitable and orbiting a range of stellar types.

• The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is a space telescope, optimized to search for and image Earth-sized exoplanets in the habitable zones around sun-like stars, where liquid water might exist. HabEx would also have a suite of general astrophysics science capabilities.
Each of these concepts has pros and cons, as well as other technological, cost and risk challenges. These mission concepts will be described in detail in their final study reports, which will be delivered to the National Academy of Sciences for the Astro 2020 Decadal Survey later this year. It is still unknown whether the Decadal Survey will prioritize none, one or even several of these concepts, but the several hundred scientists and engineers involved in these mission concept studies for the past three years are confident that we are now capable of building these telescopes, and that the science that they can deliver will be compelling and change again our view of the cosmos, just as the Hubble Space Telescope has done for the past 3 decades.

We invited three scientists directly involved in each one of the three teams above to discuss these exciting future mission projects. During this SETI Talk, they will describe their projects, and tell us more about the challenges and the processes that could make these missions a reality:

• Prof. Courtney Dressing, astronomer and member of the LUVOIR Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) whose research aims to detect and characterize planetary systems orbiting nearby stars.

• Dr. Kimberly Ennico Smith, a NASA research astrophysicist, who is multidisciplinary in her approach to space instruments, telescopes and mission concepts. She is a member of the STDT of OST.

• Prof. Scott Gaudi, astronomer and community chair of the HabEx STDT, . Gaudi bridges the gap between theory and observations, with extensive experience in leadership roles and consensus-building, as well as experience with several exoplanet detection methods and exoplanet surveys.

Website: https://seti.org/event/future-nasa-space-telescopes-what-look-next-generation

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/14/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Mapping the lives and deaths of 10,000 nearby galaxies with MaNGA

The SDSS-IV MaNGA survey is obtaining resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies, providing new insights on key questions regarding galaxy growth, the regulation of star formation, and its eventual suppression through “quenching.” The largest integral field survey of galaxies ever conducted, MaNGA maps the spatial distribution and chemical composition of stars and gas, as well as their internal dynamics. I will highlight several recent MaNGA results including new evidence for the late-time build-up of outer stellar envelopes in massive early-type galaxies, constraints on quenching mechanisms across the “green valley,” and the role of mysterious “red geysers” in maintaining quiescence. Finally, I will describe how future MaNGA-like instruments on large telescopes like Keck hold promise for a new and potentially powerful cosmological probe: kinematic weak lensing.

Speaker: Kevin Bundy, Lick Observatory

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/mapping-lives-and-deaths-10000-nearby-galaxies-manga

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/14/19
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Galactic Center: a laboratory for the study of the physics and astrophysics of supermassive black holes

The center of the Milky Way hosts the closest supermassive black hole and nuclear star cluster to the Earth, offering us the opportunity to study the physics of supermasive black holes and their environment at a level of detail not possible elsewhere. I will discuss two major questions that are at the forefront of Galactic center research: (1) Is General Relativity the correct description of supermassive black holes? (2) How do nuclear star clusters form and evolve in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole? I will show how the long time-baseline of Galactic center observations, improved instrumental capabilities and the use of statistical methods to combine many types of data have led us to new insights into these questions. I will discuss the measurement of the relativistic red-shift from the sttar S0-2/S2 as it went through its closest approach to the supermassive black hole in 2018, as well as the results from the first chemcial-dynamical model of the Milky Way Nuclear Star Cluster

Speaker: Tuan Do, UC Los Angeles

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-02-08/colloquiumt

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 02/15/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LSST White Paper on Dark Matter
Discussion led by Arka Banerjee

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/lsst-white-paper-dark-matter

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 and Sat. 02/16/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/16/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 02/16/19 11:00 AM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Is Anybody Out There?

Are Fast Radio Bursts signals from ET? Or are they signals from magnetars? Is `Oumuamua an alien space ship? Or is it a rock from another solar system? Are we alone in the universe? Current and future SETI projects may provide an answer.Berkeley SETI Research Center chief scientist Dan Werthimer will describe the rationale for past and future searches and will show how new technologies are revolutionizing SETI.

Dan will describe the 100 million dollar Breakthrough Listen project, SETI@home, SETI on FAST (the world’s largest telescope), the new PANOSETI all-sky-all-the-time project, as well as concepts for future SETI.

Website: http://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/feb-16-is-anybody-out-there/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 02/16/19
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

City Star Parties - Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco
Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 02/19/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Ultra-low energy calibration of xenon-based dark matter detectors

Xenon-based experiments have demonstrated world leading sensitivity in searches for medium-to-high mass WIMP dark matter interactions. Recent developments suggest that these experiments may also be sensitive to low mass WIMPs, which requires xenon detectors to be calibrated at very low energies. In this talk, I will discuss a series of efforts made by the LLNL noble liquid group to measure the ionization yield of xenon nuclear recoils that may be produced by WIMP interactions. Using a low-energy pulsed neutron beam and a compact xenon time projection chamber, we measured neutron-induced xenon recoils between 0.3keV and 6 keV, and studied the yield dependence on the drift electric field between 200V/cm and 6.3kV/cm. The impact of this result on current and future dark matter searches will be discussed.

Speaker: Jingke Xu, Lawrence Livermore National Labs

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/ultra-low-energy-calibration-xenon-based-dark-matter-detectors

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/21/19
02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: 'Out There'

NASA's recent Kepler Mission gave us good reason to believe that the Milky Way Galaxy is home to billions of habitable worlds. Of course, "habitable" does not mean inhabited, far less intelligent. In this Wonderfest presentation, science writer Michael Wall will discuss the big questions that permeate humankind's search for extraterrestrial intelligence: What are we looking for? How are we looking? How would the world respond to confirmed contact? Dr. Wall will also discuss the long view of human space travel our effort to get out there, in the flesh.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/out-there/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/21/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Pixels to physics: the promise and challenges of survey cosmology
Speaker: Hiranya Peiris, UCL

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/21/19
06:30 PM - 08:30 PM

LASER Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous
San Jose State University
Campus Village 2 Multipurpose Room
San Jose, CA 95122

February LASER Event - San Jose
Our speakers for February 21st, 2019 include -

Dr. David Deamer
Biologist and Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering
University of California, Santa Cruz
https://www.soe.ucsc.edu/people/deamer

Stardust, Cells and the Origin of Life

Description: The paradigm is that life began in salty sea water, in the ocean, perhaps in hydrothermal vents. But there is an alternative supported by experimental evidence, that life began in fresh water hot springs undergoing cycles of wetting and drying. Under these conditions, protocells can assemble from organic compounds delivered by meteoritic infall 4 billion years ago, when life first emerged on our planet.


Yolande Harris
Artist
Research Associate
University of California, Santa Cruz
http://yolandeharris.net

Melt Me Into The Ocean: learning from underwater sound

Description: How do we engage our sonic intelligence to expand our understanding and empathy towards remote environments such as the ocean? ‘Melt Me Into The Ocean’ is a series of artworks that use deep ocean recordings in site-specific installations and sound walks. The technological ability to retrieve sounds from ocean depths and listen to them in land-bound environments, raises questions as to how our sense of place might expand to integrate the submarine world into the presence of our imagination. Sound is considered as engaging a sense of relatedness that allows participants to imaginatively dive beneath the visual surface of the ocean, encouraging a sense of presence and connectedness to arise from these encounters.


Dr. Resa Kelly
Professor, Chemistry
San José State University
http://www.sjsu.edu/people/resa.kelly/

Animations for Exploring Students' Understanding of the Particulate Nature of Reactions

Description: This presentation focuses on a qualitative study performed to examine how first semester general chemistry students made sense of contrasting atomic level animations to develop their understanding of a precipitation reaction event. Findings from interviews, card sorting and model constructing exercises will be shared to examine how the animation treatment affected students’ conceptual understanding in a clinical setting and when embedded in a General Chemistry class. Our latest animation designs, informed by recent studies, will be shown.


Victoria Scott
Artist
San Francisco
http://www.victoriascott.org

The Energy Body in VR

Description: Reality is modeled in our heads and imaginations; developing thoughts, projected feelings, intuitions about unseen forces, and visualizations of space (in the past and future). No machine can create empathy, but is it possible to open ourselves to spiritual connection, emotional intimacy, and healing of body trauma using visualizations, immersive color and spatialized sound in the virtual world to create safe containers for difficult to confront feelings?

According to energy healers, our external physical bodies, are invisibly surrounded by many differently shaped fields and auras, each with distinct colors, forms and properties. For Laser, I will present two new VR projects which give viewers abstracted visualizations of these emotional energy systems; Field, an experimental, interactive art environment, and Cloud Breath, a breathing meditation app.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/320762411901977/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 02/22/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

How computers see earth: machine learning at a global scale
Speaker: Kyle Story, Descartes Labs

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/how-computers-see-earth-machine-learning-global-scale

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, February 22, 2019
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

How to find us
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 02/22/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 02/22/2019 and Sat. 02/23/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission..

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 02/22/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/23/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Monday, 02/25/19 6:00 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

Wonderfest: Can ALL Stars Host Habitable Planets?

NASA's recent Kepler Mission discovered that most stars in our Milky Way Galaxy host planets. Among those planets, Earth-size worlds are remarkably common. But the conditions for planets around their host stars vary with both distance from the star and mass of the star. Astronomer Gibor Basri will explore the issues surrounding habitability - the ability to support life - for planets and space around ALL types of stars.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/hosting-habitable-planets/

Cost: Free

==================================

END EAS CALENDAR
 
 
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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