Calendar

Astronomy Events in Northern California

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PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OCT 22 - 1:52-4:32pm
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EAS CALENDAR


   From: Kenneth Lum
________________________________________________________________________
Events of Week of 3/23/2015 and Beyond

Monday, 03/23/15
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Berkeley Repertory Theater
2025 Adisson St
Berkeley, CA 94704

Science at the Theater: Five Big Questions

Join five Berkeley Lab scientists as they try to persuade a live audience why their big science questions are among the most important to answer. You then vote for your favorite, helping local high schools win prizes.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday, March 24 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

The Dynamics of the Yellowstone Hydrothermal System
Shaul Horowitz
US Geological Survey, Menlo Park

The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features. Some of the recent advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying the dynamics of geyser eruptions, and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake.

==================================

Tuesday, 03/24/15
01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

Lawrence Hall of Science
1 Centennial Drive
Berkeley, CA 94720

Volts & Jolts
The Lawrence Hall of Science homeschool classes engage students in experimenting, developing ideas, and working together as they learn and build new skills.

Use electric meters, magnets, and coils of wire as you discover how generators and motors work. This is a great introduction into concepts of electrical engineering for any homeschool student.

Registration is now open here.

Contact:
Lawrence Hall of Science
Email: lhssocial@gmail.com
Phone: 5106425132

Website: http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/visit/camps_and_classes/homeschool_classes

Cost:
$25 ($20 for members)

==================================

Tuesday, 3/24/2015  7:15PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

General Meeting
Doors open at 6:45.

Speaker:  Marni Berendsen

Topic:   The Real Story of the Man in the Moon

==================================

Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 7:30 pm

Kavli Auditorium
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, California 94025-7015

Jupiter in a Bottle: Extreme States of Matter in the Laboratory

Siegfried Glenzer,

Description:
Normally we think of hydrogen as a gas. But elsewhere in the universe, hydrogen under extreme pressure can exist in more exotic states. In the center of Jupiter, hydrogen becomes liquid or even solid. In the center of the sun, hydrogen is a plasma that burns itself up by nuclear fusion. Very hot, dense hydrogen can eject particles that we see as cosmic rays. At SLAC, we are now studying these extreme states of matter in the laboratory. We apply enormous pressures to hydrogen samples and use our X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, to take split-second photographs of the states that result. This lecture will describe these experiments. The information we are gathering has potential applications to astrophysics, controlled fusion and generation of proton beams for cancer therapy.

About the Speaker:
Siegfried Glenzer is the leader of the program on high energy density science at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He joined SLAC as a distinguished scientist in 2013 to build a new program exploring matter in extreme conditions using high-power lasers and the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's X-ray laser.

Glenzer did his undergraduate and graduate study at the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, where he received his PhD in 1994. He then went to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow and, in time, became the laboratory's group leader for plasma physics. At Livermore, he led the first inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility. He has been a visiting lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley and an Alexander von Humboldt senior fellow at the University of Rostock and the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Glenzer is a fellow of the American Physical Society and was awarded the society’s 2003 John Dawson Award for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research. In 2014, he received the Ernest O. Lawrence Award of the U. S. Department of Energy.

Registration is required. Live stream begins on March 24 at 7:30 p.m

https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/community/public-lectures.aspx

==================================

Wednesday, 03/25/15  07:00 PM

Science on Tap
The Crepe Place
1134 Soquel Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

NASA's Kepler Mission: Exotic Solar Systems on the Path to Earth-Like Planets

Humans have long wondered what other planetary systems are like, and if potentially Earth-like planets exist around other stars. NASA's Kepler Mission is a space telescope that was designed to answer these questions.  From four years of Kepler data we can now confidently say that the average planetary system looks nothing like our own.  Nature often makes compact planetary systems where several planets orbit closer in that Mercury's distance, where our planetary system is entirely empty. Within the startling diversity in planetary systems, Kepler data can be combed to understand how common Earth-size planets really are. I will discuss a variety of recent estimates that all point to tens of billions of Earth-sized planets in our Milky Way, and discuss the fraction of these that may be temperate enough to potentially support life.

Speaker: Johathan Fortney, UC Santa Cruz

Cost:
Free

==================================

Wednesday, 03/25/15
07:30 PM - 08:30 PM

Marin Science Seminar
320 Nova Albion Way
Terra Linda High School Rm 207
San Rafael, CA 94903

Extra dimensions, mini black holes and.. Pink Elephants?: Exciting times ahead at the Large Hadron Collider
Speaker: Lauren Tompkins, Stanford

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, March 27, 2015 8:15PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
In Town Star Party
Houge Park
San Jose, CA

Public Star Parties are not like other parties where people snack and drink.  Instead theses are star gazing parties where the SJAA and their members set up telescopes and let the public view the night skies at their leisure all for Free.  Members are there to assist the public and answer any questions anyone may have.  Non-members are also encouraged to bring their telescopes to share with the public.  The event lasts up to 2 hours. You are welcome to bring your own telescope (we are not be liable for your equipment) but please arrive roughly 1 hour before the start so as to have time to set up.  The general public is invited to come and view the skies.  All ages are welcomed.  See the Event Calendar for upcoming In-Town Star Parties.

==================================

Fri. 3/27/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 3/27/2015 and Sat. 3/28/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 3/27/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 3/28/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Tuesday, 03/31/15  12:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Saturn's Rings: An accessible Astrophysical Disk
Saturn's ring system is an astrophysical disk that is neither light-years away nor billions of years in the past. We can visit this disk at close range and observe a number of phenomena that also operate in disks of other kinds. As a result, we see small-scale processes that shape ring texture, connect those processes to the bodies and structures that cause them, and watch closely as the disk changes with time. We will discuss recent Cassini observations that elucidate disk processes including 1) "self-gravity wakes" and "spiral density waves," both of which were originally proposed for galaxies but are observed with exquisite precision in Saturn's rings, 2) "propeller" features caused by 100-meter to km-sized moonlets embedded in the disk; these are the first objects ever to have their orbits tracked while embedded in a disk, rather than orbiting in free space, and hold the potential of deepening our understanding of planetary migration, and 3) irregular edge shapes in the gaps opened up by larger moons (10 km and more), which may hold clues to angular momentum transport.

Speaker: Matthew Tiscareno, Cornell

Cost:
Free

==================================

Fri. 4/3/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 4/3/2015 and Sat. 4/4/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 4/3/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Saturday, 04/04/15
02:00 AM - 05:30 AM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

Total Lunar Eclipse

The observatory deck opens at 2am for the late night viewing festivities. A Lunar Eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the shadow of the Earth. Witness the stellar occurrence from our observation deck and come ready with your questions for our experts.  Bring binoculars, blankets and warm clothes.

Contact:
Website: https://14884.blackbaudhosting.com/14884/page.aspx?pid=196&tab=2&txobjid=ded66cff-b3ca-4bcd-b3d2-81cf01310e9f

Cost:
$15

==================================

Sat. 4/4/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat, April 4, 2015  7:30pm – 9:30pm

San Jose Astronomical Association General mtg.
Houge Park
San Jose, CA 95124

Guest Speaker: Mr. Brian Kruse, Astronomical Soc. of the Pacific
Topic: Science in the classroom through Project Astro

==================================

Monday, 04/06/15  07:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Celebrating 25 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope

In this presentation, Scowen will discuss the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope with respect to what it has taught us about the formation  of stars and planets in our Galactic neighborhood. The resolution of Hubble has allowed us to see things moving over the 20-25 years of its mission lifetime. We'll discuss topics ranging from both the Eagle and Trifid nebulae to protostellar systems with protoplanetary disks.  Add to that the meteoritic element that reveals a smoking gun that the Sun formed in an environment like the Eagle Nebula.

Speaker: Paul Scowen, Arizona State University

Contact:
Website: http://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/celebrating-25-years-of-the-hubble-space-telescope

Cost:
$12 General, $8 Members

==================================


------------------------------------
END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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