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Astronomy Events in Northern California

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EAS CALENDAR


   From: Kenneth Lum
________________________________________________________________________

 Events of Week of 05/25/2015 and Beyond
 
Tuesday, May 26 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Giant planet interiors studied with ab initio computer simulations
Burkhard Militzer, UCB

Dr. Militzer will briefly review the interior structure of different types of planets and discuss how it is affected by the miscibility of various planetary materials. Results from recent ab initiocomputer simulations will be presented that focus on the miscibility properties of four systems: hydrogen-helium mixtures in gas giant planets, hydrogen-water mixtures in ice giants, silicate-iron mixtures in the interiors of terrestrial planets.

Finally Dr. Militzer will discuss his recent model of Jupiter’s interior that he and his team are putting together before NASA’s Juno spacecraft inserts into orbit about this planet next year.

All SETI lectures available by video on YouTube after they are given: https://www.youtube.com/user/setiinstitute

=======================================

Tuesday, 05/26/15  01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

Lawrence Hall of Science
1 Centennial Drive
Berkeley, CA 94720

Hands-On Geology
Students become geologists as they explore Earth's layers with clay models, and investigate Earth's crust by performing tests on igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.

Homeschool classes at the Lawrence Hall of Science engage students in experimenting, developing ideas, and working together as they learn and build new skills.

Contact:
Lawrence Hall of Science
Email: lhssocial@gmail.com
Phone: 510 642 5132

Website: http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/visit/camps_and_classes/homeschool_classes
Cost:
$25 ($20 for members)

=======================================

Tuesday, 05/26/15  04:15 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Stanford University
Room 201
Stanford, CA 94305

Advanced LIGO: The Coming Dawn of Gravitational Wave Physics and Astronomy
David Reitze, Executive Director of the LIGO Laboratory at Caltech will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Cost:
Free

=======================================

Tuesday, 5/26/2015  7:15 PM - 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker:  Jeff Adkins

Topic:    Age of the universe interactive activity

=======================================

Thursday, 05/28/15
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 101/102
Stanford, CA 94305

Modeling the Physical Connection Between the Solar Interior and Atmosphere
Understanding how magnetic flux and energy emerges from the Sun's turbulent interior (where it is generated) into the solar corona is of great importance to a number of challenging, unsolved problems in solar and heliospheric physics. The solar magnetic field provides the energy for eruptive events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) --- the principle drivers of the most energetic and disruptive space weather events here at Earth --- and plays an integral role in all aspects of the solar activity cycle. Observations of the solar atmosphere allow us to explore the fundamental physics of magnetized plasmas in conditions that cannot be reproduced in terrestrial laboratories.

With the wealth of data from NASA missions such as, e.g., SOHO, SDO, STEREO, Hinode, and IRIS, it is evident that the dynamic interaction of magnetic structures observed at the Sun's photosphere and in the solar atmosphere occurs over a vast range of spatial and temporal scales.  Emerging active regions often develop magnetic connections to other regions of activity some distance away on the solar disk, and always emerge into a global coronal field whose structural complexity is a function of the solar cycle.

Yet even small-scale dynamic interactions can trigger rapid changes in the large-scale coronal field sufficient to power flares and CMEs.  These vast spatial and temporal disparities --- coupled with the physical differences between the plasma of the solar interior and atmosphere --- are the principal challenge of those attempting to model solar activity, and better predict space weather.

In this overview, I will summarize recent progress in the effort to dynamically model the Sun's upper convection zone-to-corona system over large spatial scales, and will present the initial results from a new, global radiative-MHD model of the upper convection zone-to-corona system, RADMHD2. I will discuss how physics-based numerical models of the convection zone-to-corona system can be used to guide the development and testing of data-driven and assimilative models of CME initiation and propagation.

Speaker: William P. Abbett, UC Berkeley

Cost:
Free

=======================================

Thurs. May 28, 4PM

Lockheed Martin Colloquia
3251 Hanover St
Building 202 Auditorium
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Quantum Annealing and It's Applications: Dr. Steven Adachi, Lockheed Martin

=======================================

Thurs., 05/28/15  8:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15
698 The Embarcadero
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: Sound

Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world.

What is sound? How high a pitch can you hear? Can you measure the speed of sound with a yardstick? Can two sounds add up to no sound? Explore these questions and more in this resonant presentation.

Website: http://exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science/may-28-2015

Cost:
Free with admission

=======================================

Fri. 5/29/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 5/29/2015 and Sat. 5/30/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 5/29/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 5/30/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 05/30/15  08:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Cracking Globular Clusters
The 160 spherical oceans of stars we call globular clusters (GCs) need aperture, good seeing and dark skies to resolve detail. But once observed to their core CG's can reveal a exquisitely rich sea of red giant and fuel spent stars that do not take us back to the big bang but rather show us time in its extreme. Michael's talk will spell out the general properties GC's and which ones to observe/image for detail. He will also cover GC formation with some N-particle animation and the role GCs play in the new field of galactic archeology.

Speaker: Michael Packer

Cost:
Free

==================================

Monday, 06/01/15
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Pleasure of Smashing Things: Dark Matter Searches at the LHC

The era of precision cosmology revealed that 80% of the total amount of matter in the universe is dark. Cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, galactic rotation curves, and gravitational lensing each provide strong evidence for the existence of dark matter. It is crucial to our understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe after the big bang and has been sought for decades. One promising candidate, motivated by both particle and astrophysics, is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). A production mechanism for WIMPs is through p-p collisions at the LHC. A motivated signature for dark matter, large amounts of missing energy, poses a unique set of challenges to the experiments. I will present an overview of searches for dark matter performed using data from Run 1 with the ATLAS and CMS experiments, prospects for future collider searches, as well as how these searches complement other detection techniques.

Speaker: Regina Caputo, UC Santa Cruz

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday, June 02 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Atmospheric Tides and the Diurnal Cycle on Earth and Other Planets

Curt Covey, Lawrence Livermore Lab

The latest standardized database of Earth climate model output features 24 high-time-frequency fields including surface pressure, allowing for the first time a direct global comparison of simulations and surface observations of atmospheric tides. The comparison reveals surprising agreement, raising the possibility of models "getting the right answer for the wrong reasons" and leading to general considerations of middle atmosphere phenomena on Earth and other worlds, e.g. superrotation on Venus and Titan. Also, since Earth atmospheric tides contribute to near-surface processes like the sea breeze, our studies lead naturally to inspection of the diurnal cycle of precipitation and the boundary layer.

==================================

Thurs., June 4, 4PM

Lockheed Martin Colloquia
3251 Hanover St
Building 202 Auditorium
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Roadmaps for Transitioning All 50 U.S. States and 139 Countries to Wind, Water and Solar Power For All Purposes: Dr. Mark Jacobson, Stanford University

==================================

Fri., June 5, 2015,  7PM

San Mateo County Astronomical Society
CSM Planetarium, Science Building (Bldg. 36)
College of San Mateo
1700 W. Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, CA

Astronomical Tourism

Kenneth Lum and Tom Stephany

==================================

Fri. 06/05/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 06/05/2015 and Sat. 06/06/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 06/05/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 06/06/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Monday, 06/08/15  7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Exposing the Hidden Colors of the Infrared Universe

The Spitzer Space Telescope was launched into space in 2003 and has been studying everything from asteroids in our solar system to the most remote galaxies at the edge of the observable universe including taking pictures of the disk, or plane, of our Milky Way galaxy in infrared light. Our galaxy is a flat spiral disk; our solar system sits in the outer one-third of the Milky Way, in one of its spiral arms. When we look toward the center of our galaxy, we see a crowded, dusty region jam-packed with stars. Visible-light telescopes cannot look as far into this region because the amount of dust increases with distance, blocking visible starlight. Infrared light, however, travels through the dust and allows Spitzer to view past the galaxy's center.

In this talk, Robert Hurt will talk about the science legacy of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope by explaining what hidden stories it has shed light upon over the past decade of operation. He spends much of his time rendering some of the most amazing astronomical datasets into images that everyone can view and to help understand what is going on in some of the most distant parts of the galaxy.

Website: http://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/exposing-the-hidden-colors-of-the-infrared-universe

Cost:
$12 General, $8 Members

==================================

------------------------------------
END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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