Calendar

Astronomy Events in Northern California

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EAS CALENDAR


   From: Kenneth Lum
________________________________________________________________________

Events of Week of 3/2/2015 and Beyond

==================================

Monday, 03/02/15
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Building 048, Madrone Conference Room
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

A Survey of Optical Cluster Surveys
Galaxy clusters, as the largest peaks in the cosmic density field, play an important role in astrophysics and cosmology.  As the most dramatic features of large-scale structure, the abundance of clusters provides a key opportunity to test our understanding of structure formation and cosmic expansion history.  In recent years, observational astrophysics has been revolutionized by large surveys, yielding large optical cluster catalogs allowing for precision tracking of the growth of structure.  I look at the past (Sloan Digital Sky Survey), present (Dark Energy Survey), and future (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope) of large surveys in the context of optical clusters and luminous red galaxies. In particular, I will discuss several of the challenges for achieving the required calibration uniformity and galaxy detection efficiency for precise photometric redshift measurements and mass estimation made possible by the redMaPPer cluster finder and redMaGiC red galaxy selection algorithm.

Speaker: Eli Rykoff, SLAC

Cost:
Free

==================================

Monday, 03/02/15
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

Sutardja Dai Hall
UC Berkeley
Banatao Auditorium
Berkeley, CA 94720

Deciphering the Good-Turing Enigma: Estimating Probabilities of Unlikely and Unseen Events
In their legendary WW-II effort to decipher the enigma code, I.J. Good and Alan Turing derived an equally enigmatic estimator for the probabilities of unlikely and even unseen events. It estimates the probability of events by considering not just the number of times they appeared in the sample, but also how many times other, possibly unrelated, events were observed. Though not well understood for over half a century, the Good-Turing estimator has proved invaluable in practice and is used in a variety of applications, including natural-language processing, bioinformatics and ecology. We will review the estimator, its early heuristic explanations, rigorous proofs of its efficacy that emerged over the past few years, the best possible performance of any estimator, and some unexpected implications.

Speaker: Alon Orlitsky, UC San Diego

Cost:
Free

==================================

Tuesday, March 03 2015 - 12:00 pm, PST

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

It's Life Jim, but Not as We Know It: The Prospects of Life in Titan's Seas

Jason Barnes
University of Idaho

The prerequisites for life are thought to be: (1) a liquid solvent; (2) chemical building blocks; and (3) an energy source. Life like we have on the Earth uses water for its solvent and organic molecules for its building blocks. Hence searches for Earth-like life can focus on habitable zones around stars where liquid water can be stable on planetary surfaces.

But is water the only solvent in which life can exist? Though more exotic solvents (like ammonia, liquid nitrogen, or supercritical carbon dioxide) may exist in extrasolar systems, the only surface liquids outside of Earth that we know about today occur on Saturn's smoggy moon Titan.

Dr Barnes will describe these seas, their chemistry, and hydrology, with an eye toward whether they could serve as possible abodes for life. Recent Cassini discoveries show evaporitic bathtub rings and 'salt' flats around seas, which indicate that at least some materials do dissolve in the lakes. He will also discuss new Cassini RADAR evidence for compositional variations between the seas, and VIMS observations that may show the first sea-surface waves ever seen outside of Earth.

==================================

Wednesday, 03/04/15  07:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Sentinel Mission: Finding the Asteroid Headed for Earth
Asteroids, which hit our planet at least twice each year, are the only natural disaster for which we have a technological solution. We are all living with the threat of a three-minute experience that could transform our lives and our planet forever. On Feb. 15, 2013, for example, an asteroid impact on Chelyabinsk, Russia, sent more than 1,700 people to seek medical attention, damaged more than over 7,200 buildings and cost the city more than $33 million dollars (1 billion rubles) in property damage.

Scientists have found 10,000 Near-Earth Objects, yet there are an estimated one million in our inner solar system, and the vast majority of the threatening ones are still undiscovered.  In this non-technical talk, Dr. Lu will describe the threat, and discuss the Sentinel Mission, an orbiting telescope to detect and track asteroids that cross Earth's orbit.

Speaker: Edward Tsang "Ed" Lu, former NASA Astronaut, CEO Sentinel Mission

Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Wednesday, 03/04/15
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Lafayette Library and Learning Center
Community Hall Building
3491 Mt. Diablo Blvd
Lafayette, CA 94549

The Martian: The Future of Manned Missions to Mars
New York Times bestselling author of "The Martian", Andy Weir, joins Dr. Pascal Lee, Chairman of the Mars Institute, to discuss the science, both fact and fiction, of this sci-fi thriller. Don't miss this far reaching conversation moderated by NASA Scientist, Dr. Margaret Race.

See weblink for registration and box meal information.

Website: http://calacs.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/03-04-2015-Science-Cafe-Future-of-Manned-Missions-to-Mars-.pdf

Cost:
Free

==================================

Wednesday, 03/04/15
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Stanford University
Cubberley Auditorium
485 Lausen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Echoes Of Art And Science: Creative Explorations Of The Universe

From the dawn of the Space Age in the 1960s that led to the Apollo Landing on the Moon to the cosmological discoveries captured visually by space observatories and satellites, advances in our understanding of the universe have stimulated the imaginations and curiosities of people from around the globe. Beyond furthering our extraterrestrial knowledge, these scientific endeavors have led to profound cultural reverberations that transcend national and disciplinary boundaries. Presented by leading physicist Professor Peter Michelson and world-renowned artist Professor Liu Kuo-sung, this lecture will discuss the cultural implications of space exploration, specifically delving into its influence on artistic creation in China and beyond. This lecture will be moderated by Professor Xiaoneng Yang.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Thursday, 03/05/15
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
Stanford University
Room 201
Stanford, CA 94305

From black holes to superconductors (part 2 of 2)
The Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics announces the second mini-course by Stanford physics faculty on recent fundamental advances in theoretical physics. The winter quarter's lectures will be by Professor Sean Hartnoll.

Black holes have the remarkable property of irreversibility: if you fall into a black hole you can't get out (classically). This immediately suggested a connection with the other famous irreversibility in physics: the law of increase of entropy. Since the 70s, this connection between black holes and thermodynamic systems has been fleshed out in increasing detail and has lead to surprising conclusions. I will give an introduction to a recent body of work showing how black holes can in fact be used to shed light on exotic materials of interest in condensed matter physics, including the still-not-understood high temperature superconductors.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Friday, 03/06/15  08:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
College of San Mateo
Building 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Living with the Stars

We are quite literally not who we were years, weeks, or even days before. The stuff that makes our body is being replaced all the time, from the chemicals in our cells to the very cells themselves. What lasts is not our literal substance but rather a pattern that is renewed with elements captured from the surrounding biosphere. The newly integrated material that replaced what was lost connects our body directly to animals and plants that contribute to our food and to the bacteria within us that help digest it. All of these depend on the energy of light released in the nuclear furnace deep inside the Sun combined with the carbon dioxide that cycles through the Earth's atmosphere, originating in volcanic eruptions and being released in the burning of fossil fuels made from beings in the distant past. Mixed in with that are radioactive atoms that are caused by stellar explosions across the Galaxy and from the decay of atoms deep inside the Earth. All that makes us, and all that exists around us, is tied to the stardust released in the death throes of ancient stars and ultimately to the formation of the universe itself.

Speaker: Dr. Karel Schrijver, Lockheed Martin

Cost:
Free

==================================

Fri. 3/6/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 3/62015 and Sat. 3/7/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 3/6/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 3/7/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Tuesday, March 10 2015 - 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

Going to the Ends of the Earth to Glimpse the Beginnings of Time
Brian Keating
UC San Diego

Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons are actually sensitive gravimeters. Using the intensity and polarization properties of these primeval photons, we can measure the gravitational field of the last scattering surface, the fictitious shell formed by the universe’s first hydrogen atoms.

The last scattering surface is also a gravitational wave detector; a thin “film” of matter onto which primordial gravitational waves can be “exposed”, allowing us to peer back to the inflationary epoch when these gravitational waves themselves were produced. If inflation produced a gravitational wave background, then these gravitational waves imprint a unique “swirling” pattern called B-mode polarization.

IF B-mode polarization is proven to be primordial it will be strong evidence that inflation occurred. This is the goal of a dozen experiments planned, or currently plying southern hemisphere skies: including two experiments whose results will be discussed: BICEP2 and POLARBEAR, the first experiments to directly detect the CMB’s B-mode polarization.

Current experimental sensitivities are at the tens of nanoKelvin level, unimaginable just a decade ago when the hunt for B-modes began. Dr. Keating will discuss the fundamental science that can be revealed with such


==================================

Wednesday, 03/11/15  07:30 PM

Braun Auditorium
333 Campus Drive West
(Mudd Chemistry Building)
Stanford, CA 94305

Planck: Echoes from the Big Bang
Prof. Francois R. Bouchet of the Institut d' Astrophysique in Paris, France will give the 32nd annual Bunyan Lecture.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Wednesday, 03/11/15
07:30 PM - 08:30 PM

Marin Science Seminar
320 Nova Albion Way
Terra Linda High School Rm 207
San Rafael, CA 94903

Snacking, Gorging, and Cannibalizing: The Feeding Habits of Black Holes
Speaker: Steve Croft, UC Berkeley

Cost:
Free

==================================

Friday, 03/13/15
11:30 AM - 01:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
FKB 3rd Floor Conference Room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LSST@SLAC: Eli Rykoff
On the topic of the Dark Energy Survey and some lessons learned for the LSST.

Cost:
Free

==================================

Friday, 03/13/15  07:30 PM

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Foothill College
Room 5015
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Searching for Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background
Speaker: Sarah Kernasovskiy, Stanford

Cost:
Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Fri. 3/13/2015 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 3/13/2015 and Sat. 3/14/2015

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!
Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 3/13/2015 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our
Universe!

==================================

Sat. 3/14/2015 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free.

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.





==================================

------------------------------------
END EAS CALENDAR





Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jul 18, 2012, 10:03 AM
Ċ
Alan Gould,
Jun 21, 2013, 4:06 PM
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