Talks

Are you a graduate student interested in giving a CU-Prime talk? Fill out our Speaker Application Form!

Upcoming Talks:
 Feb. 15th
 Cold Quantum Gasses - Ed Marti
 March 1st
 Biophysics - Laura Maguire
 March 15th
 TBA
 April 12th
 Physics Education Research - Jessica Hoehn
 April 26th
 Nanoscale Thermal Transport - Josh Knobloch

See below for details on upcoming talks and previous talks.

Edward Marti - Understanding Complex Systems with Cold Atoms

posted Feb 12, 2017, 5:23 PM by Adam Ellzey



Wednesday, February 15th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza

Understanding Complex Systems with Cold Atoms
Many important systems, from the weather to earthquakes to the cells in your body, feature huge numbers of intricate parts that interact on lengths scales from tiny to huge. How do physicists begin to understand these complex systems when even the most powerful computers cannot keep track of every component? In this talk, we will see how physicists build models to describe complicated phenomena and find surprising examples of 'emergence': very complex systems that act in surprisingly simple ways. As an example, we will learn how researchers at CU and other universities use ultracold atoms as a tabletop simulation of emergent quantum phenomena like magnetism and superconductivity.

Edward Marti

Kyren Bogolub - A Geophysicist's Guide to Interpreting Science and Life

posted Jan 29, 2017, 9:31 PM by Adam Ellzey

 Wednesday, February 1st at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza
A Geophysicist's Guide to Interpreting Science and Life
The Earth is a big, beautiful, and complicated place. Most people only get to appreciate a small fraction of the Earth (its surface) during a relatively short period of time (a human lifetime). Geophysics is a broad field of study that often focuses on parts of the Earth that humans have never traveled to, during time periods long before humans existed. Answering geophysical questions involves imagination and creativity, as well as critical reasoning. In this talk, you will learn about a 2nd year geophysics PhD student’s experience learning how to make responsible conclusions while dealing with uncertainty in scientific data (and in life).

Kyren Bogolub

Gabe Peterson - Parametrically coupled modes at low temperature or: What happens when you put a microwave in a refrigerator

posted Nov 28, 2016, 4:51 PM by Adam Ellzey

 Tuesday, November 29th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza
Parametrically coupled modes at low temperature or: What happens when you put a microwave in a refrigerator
Have you ever heard of a harmonic oscillator? This favorite topic of physics professors shows up just about everywhere in physics as a powerful and simple model to understand all kinds of phenomena. In this talk, I'll review some concepts about oscillators and talk about how ideas from the theory of coupled oscillators can be used to make useful and interesting electronic devices. In particular, I'll discuss some of my work at NIST using parametric interactions in superconducting circuits to control and measure microwave fields and mechanical motion with precision approaching quantum-mechanical limitations.

Gabe Peterson
Advanced Microwave Photonics Group at NIST

Catherine Klauss - Where Do Molecules Come From?: An Atom Love Story

posted Nov 9, 2016, 7:55 PM by Adam Ellzey   [ updated Nov 9, 2016, 7:56 PM ]

 Tuesday, November 15th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza
Where Do Molecules Come From?: An Atom Love Story
Atoms interact with each other in a messy, chaotic manner. Physicists at CU are attempting to study these interactions, and how they lead atoms to become molecules. Come learn how they use lasers and magnets to study this quantum phenomenon.

Catherine Klauss
Cornell Group

Andrea Carosso - Simulating Quarks and Gluons

posted Oct 25, 2016, 2:44 PM by Adam Ellzey   [ updated Oct 25, 2016, 2:46 PM ]

 Tuesday, November 1st at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor, Commons Room
Free Pizza

Simulating Quarks and Gluons
What is a quark? What is a gluon? And why are they always hidden in things like protons and neutrons? This talk will describe Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is the theory of quarks and gluons,and how computers can be used to study things about the theory that cannot be calculated by hand.

Andrea Carosso
High Energy Physics Group

Adam Lamson and Chris Edelmaier - What happens when you smash together a physicist and a biologist?

posted Oct 13, 2016, 1:44 PM by Adam Ellzey   [ updated Oct 13, 2016, 2:11 PM ]

 Tuesday, October 18th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza
What happens when you smash together a physicist and a biologist?
Physicists and biologists are mortal enemies right? Wrong! No discipline is ever truly strict in terms of what might fall under it’s auspices. Biophysics, however, is on a completely different level when it comes to interdisciplinarity. Modern biophysics has come toencapsulate the sciences of biology, chemistry, optical physics, soft matter physics, computational physics, statistical mechanics, and genetics, to name but a few. This led a couple of young disillusioned particle physicists to find a field ripe with questions waiting to be explained using common physics techniques. Harnessing the power of supercomputers, they have answered biological problems through the use of physics as well as shed light on physics problems through the use of biology. After all you cannot really have one without the other.

Adam Lamson and Chris Edelmaier
Biophysics Group

Mathis Habich - A Fluid of Quarks and Gluons

posted Oct 13, 2016, 1:35 PM by Adam Ellzey

 Tuesday, October 4th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor, Commons Room
Free Pizza
 A Fluid of Quarks and Gluons
The advent of particle colliders, such as the LHC at CERN or RHIC in Brookhaven, allow us to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions. By colliding highly accelerated ions, those machines create the so-called quark--gluon plasma which can tell us more about the fundamental forces of nature, the structure of matter itself, and the early universe.
In this talk, we will learn about colliders and the stunning features of this plasma that emerges from the collision of two "solid' ions, including recent results on proton+proton collisions at the LHC.

Mathis Habich
Romatschke Group


Tyko Shoji - Harder, Better, Faster, Steadier... Ultra-Low-Noise Mode-Locked-Lasers

posted Oct 13, 2016, 1:23 PM by Adam Ellzey   [ updated Oct 13, 2016, 1:28 PM ]

 Tuesday, September 20th at 5pm
Gamow Tower, 11th floor, Commons Room
Free Pizza
Harder, Better, Faster, Steadier... Ultra-Low-Noise Mode-Locked-Lasers
How are the shortest pulses of light created? What are they used for? What limits the stability of short-pulse lasers and how can we improve them? In this talk, Tyko will review the fundamental theory behind the operation of stable mode-locked lasers and present on recent work in achieving extremely low-noise pulse trains at a high repetition rate.

Tyko Shoji
Schibli Lab


AJ Johnson - Chocolate, Fondue, and Particle Physics: Life at the Large Hadron Collider

posted Apr 26, 2016, 2:12 PM by Adam Ellzey


Wednesday, April 27th at 5:00 pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza

Chocolate, Fondue, and Particle Physics: Life at the Large Hadron Collider
The Large Hadron Collider, located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, is the biggest particle collider in the world. Thanks to the efforts of thousands of scientists, engineers, grad students, and undergrads, the experiments on the LHC have already opened the door into an exciting new era of particle physics. But what do all these people actually do all day? How do we go from proton collisions to papers? Come learn about a day in the life of a grad student at CERN.

AJ Johnson
High Energy Physics Group


John Gray - A Particle Accelerator in Reverse: Manipulating Molecules with Electric Fields

posted Apr 8, 2016, 1:09 PM by Adam Ellzey

Wednesday, April 13th at 5:00 pm
Gamow Tower, 11th Floor,
Commons Room
Free Pizza

A Particle Accelerator in Reverse: Manipulating Molecules with Electric Fields
Producing and controlling cold molecules is essential to studying the collisions between atoms and molecules that give rise to chemistry. Cold molecules relevant to the chemistry of interstellar space, the atmosphere, and combustion are usually produced in molecular beams, which shoot molecules at over 400 m/s. This talk will discuss how we use electric fields to slow molecules from such high speeds down to rest and trap them.

John Gray
Lewandowski Group


1-10 of 23