Austria

                                                                                                                                    Großglockner
 

Austria (Österreich in German) is situated in central Europe, and has a total area of about 83,870 square kilometres.  It is bordered to the north by Germany and the Czech Republic, by Slovakia and Hungary to the east, by Slovenia and Italy to the south, and by Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west.  For further details on the country, see the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austria.

 

The western and central parts of the country are in the Alpine region and are very mountainous, with over two-thirds of the country above an altitude of 500 metres, and much above 1000 metres. 

 

Austria can be divided into three geographic areas:

 

The Pannonian Plain, in the far eastern part of the country, which extends eastwards into Hungary.  This is a low-lying area through which the River Danube flows east on its course to the Black Sea.

 

The Bohemian Forest (Böhmerwald in German) is a granite plateau on the northern flank of the Danube Valley on the border with the Czech Republic.  The highest and most prominent summit in the Austrian part of the range is the Plöckenstein on the Austro-Czech border.  This has a height of 1378m and prominence of c.518 metres.

 

The Austrian Alps consist of three ranges, which are an eastern continuation of the same ranges in Switzerland and Italy:

 

·        The Austrian Northern Limestone Alps, the northern flank of which borders Germany.  The main mountain groups in the range in Austria, moving from west to east are Vorarlberg, Lechtaler, Allgäuer, Ammergauer, Wettersteingebirge, Mieminger Gebirge, Karwendel, Reite, Mangfall Gebirge, Chiemgauer, Steinernes Meer, Salzkammergut, Totes Gebirge, Eisenwurzen and the Alpine foothills of the Wienerwald.  Further details of these ranges can be obtained via the hyperlinks hereThe highest Austrian mountain in the range is the Parseierspitze (3036m) in the Lechtaler Alpen.  This has a prominence of 1243 metres.

 

·        The Austrian Central Alps, composed principally of volcanic rocks, in which are most of the highest mountains in Austria, bordering on the Swiss and Italian frontiers on their western and southern edges.  The main mountain groups in Austria, moving from west to east, are Sesvenna, Silvretta, Rätikon, Verwall, Samnaun, Öztaler, Stubaier, Tux, Zillertaler, Kitzbühler, Hohe Tauern, Niedere Tauern, Lavantaller, Hochwesel, Fischbacher and Grazer Bergland.  Further details of these ranges can be obtained via the hyperlinks hereThe highest mountain in the range is the Großglockner (3,798m) in the Hohe Tauern. 

 

·        The Austrian Southern Limestone Alps, the southern flank of which borders on Italy and Slovenia.  The main mountain groups in Austria, moving from west to east, are Karnischer, Gailtaler, Karawanken, Steiner and Bachergebirge.  further details of these ranges can be obtained via the hyperlinks hereThe highest Austrian mountain in the range is Hohe Warte (2780m).  This has a prominence of 1144 metres.       

 

The highest mountain in Austria is the Großglockner (3,798m) in the Hohe Tauern range in south-central Austria.  As well as being the country’s highest peak, it is also the second most prominent peak in all of the Alps, with a prominence of 2,428m. 

 

There are 242 peaks in the country over 3000 metres, with at least 150 metres of prominence.  There are twelve mountains in Austria over 1,500m of prominence and fifty-eight over 600m of prominence.

 

Willy Kreuzer's website (http://www.dreitausender.at/index.php) is a very useful on the 3000m summits, and for other Austrian mountain lists.  The website is in German. 

 

All the Austrian summits of at least 600m of topographical prominence can be found on Eberhard Jurgalski’s Table of Alpine Summits at  http://www.sol.co.uk/v/viewfinder/ALPSOVER589m.html .

 

Free online maps for Austria can be found at http://www.austrianmap.at/amap/index.php?SKN=1&XPX=637&YPX=492

 

The lists downloadable below are, however, the first specifically devoted to Austrian summits using a prominence criterion.  Some also have a height criterion. 
 
Lists uploaded here:
 
  • Austrian 2500m Peaks - e-booklet version
  • Austrian 3000m Peaks - e-booklet version
  • Hills of the Wienerwald
  • Mountains & Hills of the Salzkammergut - e-booklet version
Please note that, to save space, the print-booklet versions originally downloadable on this webpage have been removed.  If you would like a print-booklet version, please contact the web-master (e-mail address on the home page).
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Mark Trengove,
17 Mar 2013, 08:01
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Mark Trengove,
17 Mar 2013, 07:59
Ċ
Mark Trengove,
13 Feb 2009, 13:06
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