Conferences

For conferences at the interface of philosophy and neuroscience at the CIN, please consult the CIN Philosophy and Neuroscience master site.


July 24, 2012

CIN Games of the Brain Workshop:
EXPLAINING MENTAL PHENOMENA
Perspectives from the Philosophy of Mind, Psychology, and Neuroscience

Hertie Institute, Seminar Room

Organised by:
Philosophy of Neuroscience Group, CIN, University of Tübingen
Lehlstuhl for Theoretical Philosophy, Philosophisches Seminar (Prof Thomas Sattig)

Speakers:
Ken Aizawa (Centenary /Bochum)
Liz Irvine (CIN Tübingen)
Achim Stephan (Osnabrück)
Catherine Stinson (CIN Tübingen /Pittsburg HPS)
Sven Walter (Osnabrück)
Hong Yu Wong (CIN Tübingen)

9.30-11.00       Ken Aizawa (Centenary /Bochum)
                        THE AUTONOMY OF PSYCHOLOGY IN THE AGE OF NEUROSCIENCE, II
                                    Commentator: Eva Schmidt (Saarbrücken)

11.00-12.30     Catherine Stinson (CIN /Pittsburg HPS)
                        IS EXPLANATION IN PSYCHOLOGY MECHANISTIC?
                                    Commentator: Uljana Feest (TU Berlin)

12.30-1.30       LUNCH (Kasino)

1.30-3.00         Liz Irvine (CIN Tübingen)
                        PROCESS MODELS AND PLURALISM
                                    Commentator: Kirsten Volz (CIN Tübingen)

3.00-3.30         Coffee Break

3.30-5.00         Achim Stephan and Sven Walter (Osnabrück)
                        SITUATED COGNITION AND AFFECTIVITY
                                    Commentator: Mog Stapleton (Stuttgart)

5.00-6.30         Hong Yu Wong
                        PRACTICAL POSSIBILTIES: A SENSE OF BODILY AFFORDANCES
                                    Commentator: Boris Hennig (Humboldt)



June 25 - July 5, 2012

CEU Summer University

PROBLEMS OF THE SELF

Directors:  Natalie Sebanz (CEU/Donders) and Hong Yu Wong (CIN)
Faculty:  Peter Callero (Western Oregon, Sociology), Gunther Knoblich (CEU Cog Sci), Beatrice Longuenesse (NYU Philosophy), Chris Peacocke (Columbia Philosophy), Philippe Rochat (Emory, Psychology), Paul Snowdon (UCL Philosophy), Manos Tsakiris (Royal Holloway, Psychology)

CEU Cognitive Science Department, Budapest


June 15-16, 2012
Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, Tuebingen

SHOULD A SCIENCE OF COGNITION USE FIRST PERSON METHODS?


Part of the Games of the Brain workshop series:
http://www.cin.uni-tuebingen.de/events/cin-lectures.php

The workshop is intended to address questions regarding the use of subjective or first-person data in cognitive science, including contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers of science, to focus on the following sorts of questions:

- If there are scientific paradigms or areas of research in which first-person data is an ineliminable part?

- If or how first-person data differs from other scientific data (e.g. is it really private data, is it incorrigible).

- Whether there are specific problems associated with collecting first-person data, as compared with other scientific data (e.g. demand characteristics, response bias).

- How to collect first-person data, and how to interpret it, given any potential methodological problems (e.g. methods for reducing bias, experimental design, choice of measurement procedure).

- Do these methodological problems raise further questions about the way first-person states should be conceptualised (e.g. are there phenomenal facts)?

Speakers:

Uljana Feest (Philosophy, Technische Universitat, Berlin)

Liz Irvine (Philosophy of Neuroscience, CIN)

Matt Longo (Psychology, Birkbeck, London)

A. J. Marcel (Psychology, University of Hertfordshire/MRC Cambridge)

Thomas Metzinger (Philosophy, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)

Gualtiero Piccinini (Philosophy, University of Missouri, St. Louis)

Jonathan Schooler (Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara)



March 21-22, 2012

International Workshop:

VARIETIES OF ACTION EXPLANATION

Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich
Wednesday, 21.03.2012 – Thursday, 22.03.2012
in Room M 210 (second floor)/ LMU Main Building

Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1
80539 Munich

Organizers: Julia Peters (Munich), Hong Yu Wong (Tuebingen)

Speakers:

Ruediger Bittner (Bielefeld)
Cord Friebe (Bonn/Saarbruecken)
Douglas Lavin (Harvard)
Johannes Roessler (Warwick)
Nancy Snow (Marquette)
Candace Vogler (Chicago)
Hong Yu Wong (Tuebingen)

***

Program:

Wednesday, 21.03.:

09.20: Welcome/Coffee

09.30 – 11.00: Ruediger Bittner (Bielefeld): "Understanding Action,
Explaining Action, Understanding People"  [Response: tba]

11.15 – 12.45: Johannes Roessler (Warwick): "Perceptual Belief: Active and
Passive" [Response: tba]

12.45 – 14.15: Lunch

14.15 – 15.45: Douglas Lavin (Harvard): "Forms of Agency" [Response: tba]

15.45 – 16.00: Coffee

16.00 – 17.30: Cord Friebe (Bonn): "Psychoanalytic Action Explanation"
[Response: tba]


Thursday, 22.03.:

09.30 – 11.00: Nancy Snow (Marquette): "Character Traits and Actions"
[Response: tba]

11.00 – 11.30: Coffee

11.30 – 13.00: Candace Vogler (Chicago): "Learning to be good: Habit
                               and Virtue" [Response: tba]

13.00 – 14.30: Lunch

14.30 – 16.00: Hong Yu Wong (Tuebingen): "Acting with that which one
feels ‘from the inside’" [Response: tba]

***

Attendance is free of charge.
For questions, please contact julia.peters[at]lrz.uni-muenchen.de

The workshop is supported by the Center of Advanced Studies, LMU and the
Munich Competence Center for Ethics (MKE)



Feb 20, 2012

CIN Workshop: Intuition and Heuristics in Decision Making

LOCATION:
CIN Rationality Quarter, Room B.0.171, TTR Building, Paul Ehrlich Str. 17

DATE:
Feb 20, 2012 (Monday)

TIME:
10:30 - 12:30


PROGRAM:

10:30 - 11:30
Thea Zander and Kirsten Volz (CIN Neural Basis of Intuition)
"On the scent of intuitive coherence judgements: exploring similarities and differences in the underlying processes of intuition and implicit memory"


11:30 - 12:30
Liz Irvine (CIN Philosophy of Neuroscience)
"What Exactly is a Process Model? Levels and Mechanisms in Psychology"

The notion of a process model is often used in psychology, particularly in decision-making research, and is taken to refer to a model that is psychologically plausible or realistic. It is contrasted with ‘as-if’ models that merely account for input-output relations. On the face of it the distinction is a clear one, but it is in fact unclear what exactly a (good) process model is. This question is largely motivated by recent criticisms, and subsequent modeling advances, of the ‘fast and ‘frugal’ approach models proposed by Gigerenzer and the ABC group. Using Marr’s and Craver’s levels of explanation, I will suggest that these criticisms/advances illustrate the use of (at least two) different notions of a process model in the decision-making literature. These different types of process models have different core properties, are defended in different ways, and demand different types of testing. This may explain at least some of the disagreement surrounding the heuristics program, and is likely to generalize to other debates in cognitive science. I may also (very briefly) defend what I think is the most interesting/productive way of building process models in cognitive science.



July 5, 2011

Does Neuroscience make Philosophy Irrelevant?
Workshop on the Philosophy of Neuroscience

10.00 am - 12.00 pm

CIN Seminar Room
Centre for Integrative Neuroscience
Paul-Ehrlich-Str. 17
72076 Tübingen, Germany

Speakers: 

Liz Irvine (Edinburgh)
Evaluating ‘mental’ concepts: The role of scientific practice

Anders Nes (CSMN Oslo)
Can there be entirely unconscious agents? The case of decorticated rats and cats




June 6-7, 2011

Inaugural Graduiertenkolleg Workshop:


RATIONAL AGENCY

Theme of Day 1: Modes of Rationality

Theme of Day 2: Mechanisms of Control

featuring Michael Bratman (Stanford), Marcel Brass (Gent), Henry Brighton (MPI Human Development), Stephen Butterfill (Warwick), Sabine Döring (Tübingen), Thomas Goschke (TU Dresden), Axel Lindner (HIH), Kirsten Volz (CIN), Hong Yu Wong (CIN) and others

at the Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, Tübingen



May 27, 2011

Birkbeck-CSMN (Oslo)

HORNSBY FEST:

Celebrating Jen Hornsby’s Philosophy: Action, Mind, Language, and Gender

Friday May 27th, 9.30-5.00, Birkbeck Main Bldg Rm 421

Professor Jennifer Hornsby has been a major force in British philosophy since the 1970s. This conference aims to reflect on and celebrate her contribution to philosophy over the years, and provide the first systematic overview of Prof Hornsby’s corpus.

Jen will respond informally to the speakers:

    Prof John McDowell (Pittsburg)
    Dr Helen Steward (Leeds) - 'Actions as Processes'
    Dr Adrian Haddock (Stirling)
    Prof Julian Dodd (Manchester)
    Prof Rae Langton (MIT)

For further details see the CSMN site for this event.



FEB 4, 2011 CenSes Workshop:

THE BODY: SENSATION AND REPRESENTATION

Chancellor's Hall
Senate House
University of London


What role does the body and our awareness of it play in perception and
action? In this workshop, we will be asking foundational questions
about the nature of bodily awareness and bodily representations, and
exploring how they relate to pain and touch. The workshop brings
together philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists in an
interdisciplinary investigation of these questions. This is the second
of a series of CenSes workshops presenting cutting edge research on
our sense modalities. The next workshop will be in April 15, 2011, on
predictive coding.


9.15-9.45 Registration/coffee

9.45-10
The Body: Sensation and Representation - an introduction
Patrick Haggard (ICN, UCL) and Hong Yu Wong (CIN, Tübingen)

10-11.30
Frederique de Vignemont (CNRS/Jean Nicod)
Multimodal bodily experiences

Commentator: Tamar Makin (Oxford)

11.30-1
Giadomenico Iannetti (UCL)
The pain matrix reloaded

Commentator: David Bain (Glasgow)


1-2 LUNCH (own arrangements)


2-3.30
Morten Kringelbach and Tipu Aziz (Oxford)
Sing the mind-body electric: deep brain stimulation for chronic pain

Commentator: Lucy O'Brien (UCL)

3.30-4
COFFEE BREAK

4-5.30
M. G. F. Martin (UCL/Berkeley)
Appearance & Solidity: A Sense of Body in the World

Commentator: Manos Tsarkiris (Royal Holloway)

5.30-6.30
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
led by Chris Frith (UCL/Aarhus), Patrick Haggard (ICN, UCL) and Hong Yu Wong (CIN, Tübingen)



For details of the conference
    Consciousness and The Will: Celebrating the Work of Brian O'Shaughnessy
    June 17-19, 2010
    Institute of Philosophy, University of London
click here.
 
For a podcast of the talks at this conference click here.
 
Sadly, Brian O'Shaughnessy passed away on 7 July 2010. An obituary by Michael Martin has appeared in the Guardian.