Somalia updates

Islam and Somalia.

21. SW broadcasting to Somalia

 

21. Idaacad SW raadiyo u Soomaaliya.

       SW Radio broadcasts to Somalia.
      
       Radio Listening.
       Maqlid u raadiyo.
 
 

 

 

Short Wave Radio broadcast to Somalia. 

Hirarka gaagaaban raadiyo idaacad u Soomaaliya.

 

Short Wave radio allows the people of Somalia to listen from anywhere, the city, the village or in the bush. 

 

The Somali language.

Somali is a Cushitic language and in 2009 it is spoken by 17 million people (17,000,000) worldwide.

Somali is the official language for 9 million people in Somalia and Somaliland.

Somali is used by 6 million people in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Finland, Italy, Kenya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and Yemen.

Outside Somalia, Somaliland and the large Somali speaking community countries mentioned above there are 2 million people in the other countries of the world (Africa, Middle East, Europe, America, Australia etc) who speak the Somali language.

(This is a minimum figure judgement based on the differing opinions from UCLA Language Materials Project and Wikipedia).

SOMALIA MAP, Somali Language Map is the yellow region. 

                Thanks to UCLA Language Materials Project *.                 

 

SW Short Wave Radio broadcasts to Somalia.

22 April 2009.

 

International Short Wave broadcast season A09 is in effect from 29 March 2009 to 24 October 2009.

Internationally Short wave broadcasting frequencies are coordinated to avoid interference between broadcasters with the United Nations (UN) International Telecommunications Union (ITU). The following short wave broadcast times and frequencies for the BBC and VOA are in effect from 29 March 2009 to 24 October 2009.

 

 

Short Wave Radio broadcasts in Somali to Somalia from England.

 

Soomaaliya, Soomaaliya halkani waa radio BBC, London.

Barnaamijyada Idaacadda BBC Soomaaliga.

British Broadcasting Corporation BBC Somali radio programs.

 

 

The first BBC world service short wave broadcast from England to Somalia in the Somali language was on the 18 July 1957.

The British Broadcasting Company was started in 1922 and became the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1927.

In 2009 BBC broadcasts in 32 languages to 182 million people worldwide.

The first BBC broadcasts to Africa on Short Wave Radio were from transmitters in England.

In 2009 Short Wave radio transmitters in England can be used in an emergency however normally BBC programs for Africa are relayed (broadcast) by using Short Wave transmitters located in or near Africa.

 

The BBC broadcasts from studios in London, England to Somalia in Somali on SW Short Wave radio 4 times every day for a total of 2 hours each day at these times and on these frequencies:

 

30 minute BBC broadcast every Saturday to Friday (Sabti-Jimco) in the Somali afternoon from 1300-1330 local Somalia time (1100–1130 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  6.005 MHz (49 metre band) and

  9.630 MHz (31 metre band) and

15.360 MHz (19 metre band).

 

45 minute BBC broadcast every Saturday to Friday (Sabti-Jimco) in the Somali afternoon 1615-1700 local Somalia time (1415–1500 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

11.860 MHz (25 metre band) and

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) and

21.490 MHz (13 metre band) 

 

1 hour BBC broadcast every Thursday to Friday (Khamiis-Jimco) in the Somalia afternoon 1600-1700 local Somalia time (1400–1500 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

11.860 MHz (25 metre band) and

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) and

17.740 MHz (16 metre band) and

21.490 MHz (13 metre band).

 

30 minute BBC broadcast every Saturday to Friday (Sabti-Jimco) in the Somali evening 2000-2030 local Somalia time (1800–1830 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  6.005 MHz (49 metre band) relayed from Seychelles 250 kW and

  9.630 MHz (31 metre band) relayed from Seychelles 250 kW and

15.360 MHz (19 metre band).

 

 

Short Wave Radio broadcasts in English to Somalia from England.

 

Barnaamijyada Idaacadda BBC Ingiriis.

British Broadcasting Corporation BBC Somali radio programs.

 

 

The BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) broadcasts in English from studios in London, England to East Africa on SW Short Wave radio for 19 hours a day using Short Wave radio transmitter relay stations near or in Africa.

Short Wave radio transmitters in England can be used to broadcast directly to Africa in an emergency.

 

BBC in English for Somalia and East Africa can be heard every day on these times and frequencies:

 

2 hour BBC broadcast from 0200–0400 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

6.005 MHz (49 metre band).

0200-0300 UTC relayed from a 250 kW BBC Short Wave transmitter in Mahe, Seychelles Indian Ocean relay station.

0300-0400 UTC relayed from a 250 kW BBC Short Wave transmitter in English Bay, Ascension Island Atlantic Ocean relay station.

 

2 hour BBC broadcast from 0300–0400 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

9.750 MHz (31 metre band) from a 250 kW transmitter in the Seychelles.

 

2 hour BBC broadcast from 0300–0500 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

12.035 MHz (25 metre band) from the 250 kW BBC Short Wave transmitter in Zygi, Cyprus east Mediterranean relay station.

 

2.5 hour BBC broadcast from 0330–0600 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

11.945 MHz (25 metre band) from a 250 kW transmitter in the Seychelles.

 

3 hour BBC broadcast from 0500–0800 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) from a private company Short Wave relay transmitter in Meyerton, South Africa.

 

2 hour BBC broadcast from 0500–0700 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

17.640 MHz (16 metre band) from the relay station in Cyprus.

 

9 hour BBC broadcast from 0800–1700 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

17.640 MHz (16 metre band) from the South Africa relay station and

21.470 MHz (13 metre band) from 0800-1400 UTC from the South Africa relay station and from 1400-1700 UTC from the relay station in Cyprus

 

 

2 hour BBC broadcast from 1300–1400 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) from the relay station in Seychelles.

 

30 minutes BBC broadcast from 1500–1530 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  7.385 MHz (41 metre band) from the South Africa relay station and

11.860 MHz (25 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station and

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station.

 

45 minutes BBC broadcast from 1530–1615 UTC (Saturday) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  7.385 MHz (41 metre band) from the South Africa relay station and

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station.

 

45 minutes BBC broadcast 1615–1700 UTC (Saturday and Sunday) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  7.385 MHz (41 metre band) from the South Africa relay station and  

11.860 MHz (25 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station and

15.420 MHz (19 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station.

 

2 hours BBC broadcast 1700–1900 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

7.405 MHz (41 metre band) from the South Africa relay station.

 

45 minutes BBC broadcast 1700–1745 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

6005 MHz (49 metre band) and

9410 MHz (31 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station.

 

2.5 hour BBC broadcast 1830–2100 UTC on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

6005 MHz (49 metre band) and

9410 MHz (31 metre band) from the Seychelles relay station.


 

 


 

Short Wave Radio broadcasts in Somali to Somalia from the USA.

 

Soomaaliya, Soomaaliya halkani waa radio VOA, Washington.

Barnaamijyada Idaacadda VOA Soomaaliga.

VOA Voice of America Somali radio programs.

 

The Voice of America, started in 1942, and today broadcasts 1,000 hours of programming in 44 languages every week to 115 million people worldwide.

 

The Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts in Somali to Somalia on Short Wave 3 hours every day at these times and on these frequencies:

 

1 hour VOA broadcast every Somalia afternoon from 1500-1600 local Somalia time (1300–1400 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

12.110 MHz (25 metre band short wave) 22 April 2009 heard in Sydney signal strength 3 at 1300 UTC and signal strength 5 at 1330 UTC.

15.170 MHz (19 metre band short wave) 22 April 2009 heard in Sydney weakly using the 250kW Radio Netherlands relay station at Talata-Volondry, Madagascar.

 

30 minute VOA broadcast every Somalia evening from 1800-1830 local Somalia time (1600–1630 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha): 

  1.431 MHz Relayed by the Radio Sawa 600 kW medium wave transmitter in Djibouti and  

12.110 MHz (25 metre band short wave) and

15.430 MHz (19 metre band short wave) relayed from a 100 kW transmitter in Botswana.

 

1 hour 30 minute VOA broadcast every Somalia evening from 1830-2000 local Somalia time (1630-1800 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

12.110 MHz (25 metre band short wave) and

15.430 MHz (19 metre band short wave) relayed from a 100 kW transmitter in Botswana.

 

 

An earlier report was-

The Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts in Somali to Somalia on Short Wave 2 hours every day at these times and on these frequencies:

 

1 hour VOA broadcast every Somalia evening from 1800-1830 local Somalia time (1600–1700 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  1.431 MHz Relayed by the Radio Sawa 600 kW medium wave transmitter in Djibouti using a non directional antenna (Radio Sawa is the VOA transmitter in Djibouti that broadcasts VOA Arabic language programs to Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen. The station is on air 24 hours a day) and

13.580 MHz (22 metre band short wave) relayed from a 250 kW transmitter in Sri Lanka with a directional antenna pointed 267 degrees, that is slightly north of east from Sri Lanka towards Somalia and

15.620 MHz (19 metre band short wave) relayed from a 100 kW transmitter in Botswana with a directional antenna pointed 10 degrees, which is slightly right of north from Botswana towards Somalia.

 

1 hour VOA broadcast every Somalia evening from 1900-1930 local Somalia time (1700 – 1800 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

13.580 MHz (22 metre band short wave) relayed from a 250 kW transmitter in Sri Lanka and

15.620 MHz (19 metre band short wave) relayed from a 100 kW transmitter in Botswana with a directional antenna pointed 10 degrees, which is slightly right of north from Botswana towards Somalia.


 

Short Wave Radio broadcasts in English to Somalia from the USA.

 

Soomaaliya, Soomaaliya halkani waa radio VOA, Washington.

Barnaamijyada Idaacadda VOA Ingiriis.

VOA Voice of America Somali radio programs.

 

Voice of America broadcasts to Somalia in English every morning and evening on short wave radio.

 

These VOA broadcasts can be heard in Somalia, Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mayotte, Reunion, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tanzania and Uganda.

 

4 hour VOA broadcast every Somalia morning from 0600-1000 local Somalia time, (0400-0800 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):  

  6.080 MHz (49 metre band) and

15.580 MHz (19 metre band).

 

7 hour VOA broadcast every Somalia afternoon from 1700-2400 local Somalia time, (1500-2200 UTC Universal time) on these frequencies (Mawjadaha):

  6.080 MHz (49 metre band) and

15.580 MHz (19 metre band) relayed from a 100 kW transmitter in Botswana.

 

Free “QSL” Radio Post card from America:  In order to receive the free VOA QSL radio post card please send your request to VOA and include:

1. The time in UTC that you listened to the VOA broadcast,

2. The date of the broadcast,

3. The frequency,

4. A short comment about the program so that VOA can check that you heard their station and not another station.

5. How good or bad was the radio reception?

 

E-mail: letters@VOA.gov

Somalia has no postal service. If you are in Somalia please give the correct postal address and name of a friend in another country and ask your QSL be sent there. Ask your friend to arrange to pass it to you. Once your reception report is verified, VOA will send you a signed QSL radio post card.


Corrections and additions of Somali broadcasts to Somalia are welcome please Email. 

 

       Radio Listening.
       Maqlid u raadiyo.

  

 

Short Wave Radio and Short Wave Listening in Sydney, Australia.

Listening to unusual and interesting radio signals on short wave radio.

 

  Updated 
23 May 2009.

 

Morse code in 2009.

 Morse code in the twenty first century.

Radio Morse code.

 

Morse code on Low Frequency (LF), Long Wave (LW), Medium Wave (MW), Short Wave (SW) and VHF (Very High Frequency) radio.

 

CW Continuous Wave (radio wave) switched on and off is Morse code on radio.

 

A long one second signal is the Morse code dash and on radio sounds like Daaa.

A short eighth of a second signal is the Morse code dot and on radio sounds like Dit.

 

MCW is a modulated CW signal (made of a radio frequency carrier signal with an audio signal) and is Morse code that can be heard on an AM receiver.

 

CW is an unmodulated CW signal (made of a radio frequency carrier with no audio signal) and is Morse code that can be heard on any receiver that has a control to select SSB (Single Side Band) or LSB (Lower Side Band) or USB (Upper Side Band) or CW (Continuous Wave) or BFO (Beat Frequency Oscillator).

 

Before a Morse code radio call sign you often hear the letters “de” meaning “This is”

d (Daaa dit dit)

e (Dit)

 

Download the complete International Morse code-

MORSE CODKA CAALMIGA AH.
All in Somalia radio course topic 09

https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic09.doc

 

 

Morse code on Low Frequency (LF) radio.

 

0.060 MHz 60 kHz JJY Hagane-yama, Japan standard time and frequency radio signal transmitting station. This time signal station provides accurate time and accurate radio frequency signals. 

The call sign JJY is transmitted in Morse code (CW) to identify the station at 15 and 45 minutes past the hour.

The call sign JJY was heard twice in Morse code on 10 May 2009 at 1515 UTC signal strength 1.

 

Morse code on Long Wave radio.

 

0.206 MHz 206 kHz BIK Bindook (102 km, 63 miles west south west from Sydney, N.S.W., Australia). This 24 hour radio beacon for aircraft broadcasts a radio carrier with a Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign BIK every 5 seconds. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0630 UTC signal strength 1.

 

0.215 MHz 215 kHz MRY, Moruya (300 km south of Sydney, N.S.W., Australia).

This 24 hour radio beacon for aircraft broadcasts a radio carrier with a Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign MRY every 5 seconds. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0608 UTC signal strength near 0 very weak.

 

0.224 MHz 224 kHz WMD West Maitland airport (160 km north of Sydney, N.S.W., Australia).

This 24 hour radio beacon for aircraft broadcasts a radio carrier with a Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign WMD every 5 seconds. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0608 UTC signal strength 1.

 

0.239 MHz 239 kHz WOL Wollongong airport (77 km (47 miles) south southwest of Sydney, N.S.W., Australia).

This 24 hour radio beacon for aircraft broadcasts a radio carrier with a Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign WOL every 5 seconds. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0600 UTC signal strength 1.

 

0.281 MHz 281 kHz CN Camden airport (60km south west of Sydney, N.S.W., Australia).

The Camden Terminal information for aircraft 24 hour radio beacon has voice weather information and Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign CN every 5 seconds.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0545 UTC signal strength 3.

 

 

Morse code on Medium Wave MW (Medium Frequency MF) radio.

 

0.347 MHz 347 kHz T RIC Richmond airport, Royal Australian Air Force RAAF base, Northwest Sydney, Australia. The Richmond Terminal information for aircraft 24 hour radio beacon has voice weather information and Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign T RIC every 5 seconds.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0540 UTC signal strength 9.

 

0.365 MHz 365 kHz WLM Williamtown airport, Newcastle airport, Royal Australian Air Force RAAF base, N.S.W, Australia.

The Williamtown Terminal information for aircraft 24 hour radio beacon has voice weather information and Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign WLM every 25 seconds.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0515 UTC signal strength 7.

 

0.416 MHz 416 kHz BK (BTK, BKE, BEEKE, BEEK, 7K, 7EK, 7KE) Bankstown airport, Western Sydney, N.S.W., Australia. The Bankstown Terminal information for aircraft 24 hour “BK” radio beacon has voice weather information and a faulty Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting a different call sign every 5 seconds (BTK, BKE, BEEKE, BEEK, 7K, 7EK, 7KE) including some International Morse codes that do not exist. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0456 UTC signal strength 9 with a loud tone on the radio carrier.

 

0.428 MHz 428 kHz GLF Mascot airport, Kingsford Smith airport, Sydney airport, Southern Sydney, N.S.W., Australia. The Sydney Terminal information for aircraft 24 hour radio beacon has voice weather information including the time and Modulated Morse code (MCW) identification transmitting the call sign GLF every 5 seconds.

 

1.724 MHz 1724 kHz GA metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting the call sign GA in Morse code every 2 seconds.
10 May 2009 at 1204 UTC with signal strength 4.

Synchronised with the signal that is using the same call sign on 1.726 MHz.
GA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0338 UTC.

 

1.726 MHz 1726 kHz GA metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting the call sign GA in Morse code every 2 seconds.
10 May 2009 at 1204 UTC with signal strength 4.

Synchronised with the signal that is using the same call sign on 1.724 MHz.
GA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0338 UTC.

 

1.750 MHz 1750 kHz WR2 metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign WR2 in Morse code followed by a 2-second carriers.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2008 at 1215 UTC with signal strength 7.
GA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0338 UTC.

 

1.768 MHz 1768 kHz 2AFXY Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes the call sign 2AFXY followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2050 UTC with signal strength 8.

 

1.781 MHz 1781 kHz 2AEEF Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 3 minutes the call sign 2AEEF in Morse code followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2009 at 1146 UTC with signal strength 9.
2AEEF is within 300 km of Sydney
as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0338 UTC under signal strength 8 noise.

 

1.783 MHz 1783 kHz 2ADQR Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2ADQR followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
10 May 2009 at 1157 UTC with signal strength 9 and fading.
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by several extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0345 UTC.

 

1.783 MHz 1783 kHz 2AHBD Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 5 minutes the call sign 2AHBD in Morse code followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
15 May 2009 at 1807 UTC with signal strength 8.
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by several extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0345 UTC.

 

1.784 MHz 1784 kHz 2AFHI Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 5 minutes the call sign 2AFHI followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

15 May 2009 at 1804 UTC with signal strength 6.
Possibly near maximum daytime radio propagation distance from Sydney as indicated by extremely weak unidentified Morse code signals on 18 May 2009 at 0356 UTC.

 

1.798 MHz 1798 kHz 2AHAD Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AHAD followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
17 May 2009 at 2010 UTC with signal strength 6.
2AHAD is within 300 km of Sydney
as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0358 UTC of constant signal strength under the S8 noise level.

 

1.800 MHz 1800 kHz 2AFLM Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFLM followed by one 2-second duration carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.
18 May 2009 at 2055 UTC with signal strength 8.

2AFLM is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0520 UTC.

1.803 MHz 1803 kHz 4BHI Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting in Morse code every 4 minutes the call sign 4BHI followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

30 April 2009 at 0630 UTC with signal strength 8.
4BHI is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0131 UTC heard at constant strength under S8 noise.

 

1.804 MHz 1804 kHz 2AFMN Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting in Morse code every 4 minutes the call sign 2AFMN followed by a 2-second carrier.

This sequence of Morse code identification and carrier are sent 3 times.

2AFMN is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0135 UTC with signal under S8 noise.

 

1.805 MHz 1805 kHz 3TFA Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3TFA followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
29 April 2009 at 0757 UTC with signal strength 5.
3TFA is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 17 May 2009 at 0415 UTC.

 

1.809 MHz 1809 kHz 3ADST Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3ADST followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
30 April 2009 at 0757 UTC with signal strength 5.
3ADST
is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0430 UTC under S8 noise.

 

1.818.6 MHz 1818.6 kHz 2 alternating carrier signals each second.

One carrier on 1.818.5 MHz 1818.5 kHz the other carrier on 1.818.7 MHz 1818.7 kHz.

23 May 2009 at 1255 UTC still continuing at 1400 UTC with signal strength 5.

(Not 1.818 MHz 1818 kHz 2 alternating carriers or 1.818.5 MHz 1818.5 kHz 2 alternating carriers or 1.819 MHz 1819 kHz 2 alternating carriers  )

 

1.820 MHz 1820 kHz 2AFQR Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFQR followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
15 May 2009 at 2007 UTC with signal strength 5.
2AFQR
is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0435 UTC.

 

1.821.5 MHz 1821.5 kHz VK3AMD Amateur Radio Station, Hughesdale, Victoria, Australia.
Allan Doble (ham radio call sign VK3AMD) was using Morse code sending “CQ three times (meaning: this is an invitation to anyone who would like to have a conversation with me) de VK3AMD K” on 17 May 2009 at 2010 UTC signal strength 9 plus 30dB and at 2053 UTC signal strength 9 plus 20dB.

(Not 1821 kHz VK3AMD or 1822 kHz VK3AMD).

 

1.822 MHz 1822 kHz 2AHAL Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AHAL followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier were transmitted 3 times.
30 April 2009 at 0755 UTC with signal strength 5.
Sydney daylight reception of 2AHAL on 17 May 2009 at 0637 UTC was signal strength 4 estimated.

2AFQR is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0442 UTC.

 

1.823 MHz 1823 kHz K9DX Amateur Radio Station, Barrington, Illinois, USA. John was heard calling CQ (general call inviting anyone to have a two way conversation on radio) using Morse code (CW) on 10 May 2009 at 0953 UTC with signal strength 7.

 I sent John this email “I heard you this evening in Sydney, Australia. I am using a 160m half wave dipole antenna in my home 6 km north of the Sydney harbour bridge.

Here is a reception report of your transmission. 

K9DX, amateur radio station in the USA replied to my Email reception report on 12 May 2009:

K9DX said "I was running a power of 1.5 kW (1500 Watts) to a 9 element vertical steerable antenna array pointed west (away from Australia). If I had switched the antenna towards your direction then the signal would have been a couple signal strength units higher. 

12 May 2009 reply sent by Sam Voron VK2BVS in Australia:

Your antenna is fantastic. 

I would never have imagined that such a system were behind the CQ call that I heard.

Well done!!!

I put the photo of your antenna (below) on this web page so that others can go to your web page and see more.

13 May 2009 reply sent by John Battin K9DX in the USA:

Beautiful, Thanks.

 

In Australia John had a strong signal from the USA on the 1.8 MHz (160 metre band).

Here is a photo of the antenna used by John when I heard his CQ (general call inviting anyone who would like to have a conversation) using Morse code. 

I love John's antenna and I say that every ham radio operator should have one!

Aircraft view of crop circles made by amateur radio operators to remove crops and install antennas. These are the 9 antennas used by John Battin (Ham radio call sign K9DX) on a wavelength of 160 metres to acheive world wide communications from the USA using Morse code in 2009.

See more K9DX photos: http://nidxa.org/memberWWW/k9dx_antennas.htm

 

1.824 MHz 1824 kHz 2AFRS

Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2AFRS followed by three 2-second carriers.
The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.
13 May 2009 at 0528 UTC with signal strength 5.
2AFRS
is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0449 UTC under S8 noise.

 

1.825 MHz 1825 kHz 2ABXY Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 2ABXY followed by three 2-second carriers.
The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

2ABXY is within 300 km of Sydney as indicated by daytime reception on 18 May 2009 at 0430 UTC with signal strength under S8 noise.

1.837 MHz 1837 kHz 2AHAQ Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting in Morse code the call sign 2AHAQ followed by a 2-second carrier.
29 April 2009 at 0746 UTC with signal strength 6.

2AFQR is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0505 UTC.

1.910 MHz 1910 kHz SK5 metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign SK5 followed by three 3-second carriers.
10 May 2008 at 0958 UTC with signal strength 9.
No Sydney sunset reception of SK5 on 17 May 2009 at 0705 UTC

 

2.000 MHz 2000 kHz KQ8 metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign KQ8 followed by three 3-second carriers.
10 May 2008 at 1232 UTC with signal strength 7.
No Sydney sunset reception of KQ8 on 17 May 2009 at 0720 UTC.

 

2.032 MHz 2032 kHz TR2 metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting once every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign TR2 followed by three 3-second carriers.
10 May 2008 at 1328 UTC with signal strength 0 to 2.
When I first heard this station it was good but with changing radio conditions it took 1 more hour until I was able to identify the call sign.

You can enjoy working on the Internet while you listen to the radio to identify such weak signals.
No Sydney sunset reception of TR2 on 17 May 2009 at 0724 UTC.

 

2.164.5 MHz 2164.5 kHz D9 metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 3 minutes in Morse code the call sign D9 followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 time.

23 May 2009 at 1320 UTC signal strength 7 with fading. Very slight frequency shift noted on the carrier suggested battery voltage level might be slightly low.

2.240 MHz 2240 kHz 4MWZ Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 4MWZ followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 time.

18 May 2009 at 2043 UTC fading out and at 0738 UTC signal strength 0 to 2.

4MWZ is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by sunrise fade out on 18 May 2009 at 2043 UTC.

18 May 2009 at 0738 UTC the signal strength was 0 to 2 and an occasional slight frequency shift indicates power supply voltage may be low.

 

2.267 MHz 2267 kHz 3NSH Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3NSH followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2124 UTC with signal strength 2.

3NSH is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0650 UTC.

 

2.291 MHz 2291 kHz 3MZS Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3MZS followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2110 UTC with signal strength 0 to 2 and at 0720 UTC signal strength 0 to 2.

 

2.423 MHz 2423 kHz X10 ocean beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign X10 followed by a 2-second carrier.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2000 UTC with signal strength 2.

No Sydney sunset reception of X10 on 18 May 2009 at 0708 UTC.

 

2.453 MHz 2453 kHz “5” Ocean beacon transmitting “de 5” (This is call sign 5) three times in Morse code every 5 minutes.
15 May 2009 at 1952 UTC signal strength 7.
No Sydney sunset reception of “5” on 17 May 2009 at 0730 UTC.

 

2.478 MHz 2478 kHz CA5 Ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign CA5 followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2118 UTC with signal strength 5.

No Sydney sunset reception of CA5 on 18 May 2009.

 

2.488 MHz 2488 kHz CS9 ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign CS9 followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2117 UTC with signal strength 5 to 7 and at 0643 UTC signal strength 3 to 6.

 

2.514 MHz 2514 kHz CG8 (CGN, CGN8, CGGN) metrological ocean weather beacon
transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code the call sign CG8 followed by three 3-second carriers.
10 May 2008 at 1356 UTC with signal strength 7.
Sometimes the Morse identification would be faulty and instead of sending CG8 it sent CGN, CGN8 or CGGN.
No Sydney early evening reception of CG8 on 17 May 2009 at 0744 UTC.

 

2.578.3 MHz 2578.3 kHz CN1 Australia metrological ocean weather beacon transmitting every 4 minutes in Morse code the call sign 3NSH followed by three 2-second carriers.

The sequence of Morse code and carrier are transmitted 3 times.

18 May 2009 at 2124 UTC signal strength 2.

3NSH is over 200 km from Sydney as indicated by no daytime signal on 18 May 2009 at 0650 UTC.

(Not 2578 kHz CN1 or 2578.5 kHz CN1 or 2579 kHz CN1).

 

2.844 MHz 2844 kHz KM0 Ocean beacon transmitting every 5 minutes in Morse code “KM0” three times.
15 May 2009 at 1955 UTC with signal strength 6.
Sydney early evening reception of KM0 on 17 May 2009 at 0754 UTC with a weak signal
.

No Sydney afternoon reception of KM0 on 18 May 2009 at 0515 UTC.

 

 

Morse code on Short Wave.

 

3.699 MHz 3699 kHz VK2WI, amateur radio station in Dural, Northern Sydney, N.S.W., 
Australia.
Amateur Radio New South Wales, Australia is a 24 hour automatic Morse code transmitting station for anyone who wants to learn Morse code. The speed of the Morse code transmission changes from slow (5 words per minute) to higher speeds. The call sign VK2WI in CW (Morse code) is transmitted every 2 minutes. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0100 UTC signal strength 9.

 

4.209.5 MHz 4209.5 kHz TAH Istanbul Radio, Turkey (Istanbul Turk Radyo) coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 1951 UTC signal strength 8 sending the radio call sign TAH once on Morse code followed by 3 synchronizing signals.

This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

(Not 4209 kHz TAH or 4210 kHz TAH).

 

4.210.5 MHz 4210.5 kHz UFL Vladivostok Radio, Russia Pacific Ocean coastal radio station
ship to shore communications.
On 18 May 2009 at 1424 UTC sending “de UFL” on Morse code every 18 seconds followed by synchronizing signals at signal strength 7.

(Not 4210 kHz UFL or 4211 kHz UFL).

 

4.212 MHz 4212 kHz XSQ Guangzhou Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 1950 UTC signal strength 9 sending the radio call sign XSQ once on Morse code followed by 3 synchronizing signals. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

4.215 MHz 4215 kHz XSG Shanghai Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 16 May 2009 at 1945 UTC signal strength 9 sending the radio call sign XSG in Morse code once followed by 3 synchronizing signals. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

4219 MHz 4219 kHz TAH Istanbul Radio, Turkey (Istanbul Turk Radyo) coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 2004 UTC signal strength 8 sending the radio call sign TAH once on Morse code followed by 3 synchronizing signals. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

4.225 MHz 4225 kHz 7NPE with VVV test signal and "7NPE" Morse code identification on 22 May 2009 at 1350 UTC signal strength-7. This station was not heard for many days earlier during which time a wideband signal was occuping the frequency. It was earlier reported as 7NWI as follows: 

4.225 MHz 4225 kHz 7NWI (4225 kHz 7NPE) unknown station.
Heard on 16 May 2009 at 2042 UTC signal strength-3 sending Morse code “VVV de 7NWI”
three times.
W I and PE can be confused at high Morse code speed.
W is dit-daaa-daaa.
i is dit-dit.
P is dit-daaa-daaa-dit.
E is dit.

 

4.326 MHz 4326 kHz “R” Russia navy base (Russian Naval Base).
Frequency marker heard on 17 May 2009 at 2000 UTC signal strength 1 sending the Morse code letter “R” continuously at a speed around 5 words per minute (5wpm). A “beep” was also heard every 6 seconds.

 

4.331 MHz 4331 kHz 4XZ Haifa Radio, Israel navy coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 16 May 2009 at 2020 UTC signal strength 6 sending Morse code messages with call sign identification “VVV de 4XZ” repeated before continuing with the message. Morse code speed was around 15 words a minute. I initially thought the call sign was 4X7 (4331 kHz 4X7). On 17 May 2009 between 1430 UTC to 2030 UTC 4XZ was heard several times.

 

4.238 MHz 4238 kHz VTP Visakhapatnam Naval Wireless Station, India navy coastal radio station ship to shore communications.
Repeating in Morse code the message VVV (3 times) VTP4/6/7/8 (3 times) on 17 May 2009 at 1350 UTC with signal strength 8.

In Morse code slash (/) is daaa dit dit daaa dit.

 

4.534 MHz 4534 kHz UWM2 unknown station (radio prefix UW is Ukraine).

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 1946 UTC signal strength 9 sending “ZKT5 (3 times) de (means this is) UMW2 (3 times)”. This Morse code format is repeated continuously. Station ZKT5 is unknown (radio prefix ZK is New Zealand).

 

4.554 MHz 4554 kHz UWM2 unknown station (radio prefix UW is Ukraine).

Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2022 UTC signal strength 3 sending “de UMW2” (three times) “K” (over) on Morse code (CW). This Morse code format is repeated continuously.

 

4.717.4 MHz 4717.4 kHz Morse code letters sent once in groups of 5.

22 May 2009 at 2025 UTC signal strength 7 to 8.

(Not 4.717 MHz 4717 kHz 5 letter groups or 4.717.5 MHz 4717.5 kHz 5 letter groups or 4.718 MHz 4718 kHz 5 letter groups)

 

5.000 MHz 5000 kHz BPM Shaanxi Astronomical Observatory, China Academy of Sciences, Shaanxi, China. This is the Chinese National Time Service Centre providing accurate time by broadcasting a “beep” every second. Heard on 12 May 2009 at 1059 UTC with fair signal strength using MCW to identify the call sign “BPM” at one minute before and 29 minutes past each hour.

 

6318 MHz 6318 kHz KLB Seattle Marine Radio, Seattle, Washington State, USA coastal radio station
ship to shore communications.
Heard on 18 May 2009 at 1415 UTC signal strength 7 sending in Morse code the call sign “KLB” (once) followed by 3 synchronizing signals.

This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

6.325.5 MHz 6325.5 kHz VZG420 Townsville Radio, Queensland, Australia coastal radio station
ship to shore communications.
Heard on 17 May 2009 at 1952 UTC signal strength 2 sending the Morse code message “CQ de VZG420” every 3 minutes followed by synchronous signals for digital communications.

This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

Heard on 18 May 2009 at 2109 UTC signal strength 9.

(Not 6325 kHz VZG420 or 6326 kHz VZG420).

 

8.417.5 MHz 8417.5 kHz XSV Tianjin Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore 
communications.
Heard on 17 May 2009 at 2024 UTC signal strength 8 sending the radio call sign XSV once on Morse code followed by 4 synchronizing signals. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

(Not 8417 kHz XSV or 8418 kHz XSV).

 

8.418 MHz 8418 kHz IAR Roma Radio (Rome Radio), Italy coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 15 May 2009 at 1754 UTC signal strength 6 sending the radio call sign IAR once on Morse code (CW) followed by synchronizing signals for digital radio communications. This Morse code and digital transmission format is repeated continuously

 

8.421 MHz 8421 kHz WLO Mobile Radio, city of Mobile, Alabama, USA coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1026 UTC signal strength 5 regularly sending the radio call sign WLO on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals for SITOR, AMTOR, PACTOR and PACTOR II digital radio communications.

 

8.422 MHz 8422 kHz NRV Guam Island, central Pacific Ocean, United States Coast Guard USCG coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1022 UTC signal strength 9 sending the radio call sign NRV on Morse code once followed by three synchronizing signals. This Morse code identification and digital sequence is repeated.

 

8.423 MHz 8423 kHz UFL Vladivostok Radio, Russia Pacific Ocean coastal radio station
ship to shore communications.
On 17 May 2009 at 2026 UTC sending “de UFL” on Morse code every 18 seconds with signal strength 4.

 

8.424 MHz 8424 kHz SVO Olympia Radio, Greece coastal radio station ship to shore communications remotely controlled from Athens, Greece.

Heard on 15 May 2009 at 1745 UTC signal strength 5 sending on Morse code “de SVO” followed by a 2-second long carrier. This Morse code and carrier format is repeated continuously

 

8.425.5 MHz 8425.5 kHz XSG Shanghai Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1038 UTC signal strength 7 regularly sending the radio call sign XSG on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals.

(Not 8425 kHz XSG or 8426 kHz XSG).

 

8.427.5 MHz 8427.5 kHz A9M Hamala Radio, Bahrain coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 15 May 2009 at 1748 UTC signal strength 3 sending on Morse code “de A9M tlx” (tlx means Telex, Telex by HF radio) followed by synchronizing signals for digital radio communications. This Morse code and digital transmission format is repeated continuously.  

(Not 8427 kHz A9M or 8428 kHz A9M).

 

8.431 MHz 8431 kHz TAH Istanbul Radio, Turkey coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 9 May 2009 at 2152 UTC signal strength 3 regularly sending the radio call sign TAS on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals.

 

8431.5 kHz UAT Moscow Radio, Russia coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2043 UTC signal strength 7 sending on Morse code “de UAT” followed by synchronizing signals for digital radio communications. This Morse code and digital transmission format is repeated continuously.

(Not 8431 kHz UAT or 8432 kHz UAT).

 

8.433 MHz 8.433 kHz XSG Shanghai Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0907 UTC signal strength 7 regularly sending the radio call sign XSG on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals.

 

8.434 MHz 8434 kHz TAH Istanbul Radio, Turkey coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 2154 UTC signal strength 3 regularly sending the radio call sign TAH on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals.

 

8.435 MHz 8435 kHz XSQ Guangzhou Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1032 UTC signal strength 5 sending the radio call sign XSQ once on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

8.436 MHz 8436 kHz VZG420 Townsville Radio, Queensland, Australia coastal radio station
ship to shore communications.
Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1032 UTC signal strength 5 sending the Morse code message “CQ de VZG420” every 5 minutes followed by synchronous signals for digital communications. This Morse code and digital sequence is repeated continuously.

 

8.484 MHz 8484 kHz HLG Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLG (call sign HLG sent 3 times) QSX (means listening on) 8 MHz K (means go ahead or over). Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1017 UTC signal strength 5 to 7. 

 

8.636 MHz 8636 kHz HLW, Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLW (call sign HLW sent 3 times) QSX (means listening on) 8 MHz K (means go ahead or over). Heard on 8 May 2009 at 1010 UTC signal strength 7. 

 

9.112 MHz 9112 kHz Morse code letters sent once in groups of 5.

Heard on MCW on 8 May 2009 at 1015 UTC signal strength 9. This is the same transmitter (reported to be from Cuba) that was earlier on 9.153 MHz 9153 kHz.

 

9.153 MHz 9153 kHz Morse code letters sent once in groups of 5.

Heard on MCW on 8 May 2009 at 0715 UTC with signal strength 9 plus 10db.

These broadcasts have previously been reported as originating from transmitters in Cuba.

 

10.000 MHz 10.000 MHz BPM Shaanxi Astronomical Observatory, China Academy of Sciences, Shaanxi, China. This is the Chinese National Time Service Centre providing accurate time by broadcasting a “beep” every second. Heard on 12 May 2009 at 1059 UTC with fair signal strength using MCW to identify the call sign “BPM” at one minute before and 29 minutes past each hour. 

 

10.433 MHz 10433 kHz Morse code letters sent once in groups of 5.

Heard on MCW on 11 May 2009 at 0933 UTC signal strength 9.

 

11.000 MHz 11000 kHz RIW Russian Navy Headquarters, Moscow, Russia.
Radio Operators based in the Kremlin in Moscow sending Morse code remotely through transmitter sites in Russia. Very active using CW Morse code to call stations followed by call sign “RIW” then “K” (K means “go ahead”). Heard on 13 May 2009 at 0630 UTC signal strength 1. 

 

12.581.5 MHz 12581.5 kHz XSV Tianjin Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2125 UTC signal strength 5 sending on Morse code “XSV” once followed by four synchronizing signals for digital radio communications. This Morse code and digital transmission format is repeated continuously.

(Not 12581 kHz XSV or 12582 kHz XSV).

 

12.585 MHz 12585 kHz NRV Guam Island, central Pacific Ocean, United States Coast Guard USCG coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 2026 UTC signal strength 9 sending the radio call sign NRV on Morse code once followed by four synchronizing signals. This Morse code identification and digital sequence is repeated.

 

12.637.5 MHz 12637.5 kHz XSG Shanghai Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2122 UTC signal strength 8 regularly sending the radio call sign XSG once on Morse code followed by synchronizing signals. Morse code and digital transmission format is repeated continuously.

(Not 12637 kHz XSG or 12638 kHz XSG).

 

12.843 MHz 12843 kHz HLO Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications. Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLO (call sign HLO sent 3 times) QSX (Q code meaning “I am listening on”) 12 MHz K (K means “go ahead anyone wishing to contact me”). Heard on 12 May 2009 at 1154 UTC signal strength 8. 

 

12.916.5 MHz 12916.5 kHz HLF Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications. Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLF (call sign HLF sent 3 times) QSX (Q code meaning “I am listening on”) 12 MHz K (K means “go ahead anyone wishing to contact me”). Heard on 12 May 2009 at 1150 UTC signal strength 8. 

(Not 12916 kHz HLF or 12917 kHz HLF).

 

12.923 MHz 12923 kHz HLW2 Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore
communications.
Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLW2 (call sign HLW2 sent 3 times) QSX (meaning “listening on “) 12 MHz K (meaning “over”). Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2117 UTC signal strength 8.

 

12935 kHz 12.935 MHz HLG Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore 
communications.
Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLG (call sign HLG sent 3 times) QSX (meaning “listening on “) 12 MHz K (meaning “over”). Heard on 15 May 2009 at 2116 UTC signal strength 8.

 

15.000 MHz 15.000 kHz BPM Shaanxi Astronomical Observatory, China Academy of Sciences, Shaanxi, China. This is the Chinese National Time Service Centre providing accurate time by broadcasting a “beep” every second. Heard on 13 May 2009 at 0759 UTC with fair signal strength using Modulated Morse code (MCW). The call sign “BPM” is sent 8 or 9 times at one minute before and 29 minutes past each hour. 

 

16.812.5 MHz 16812.5 kHz NRV Guam Island Radio, central Pacific Ocean, United States Coast Guard USCG coastal radio station ship to shore communications. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0212 UTC signal strength 1 to 2 sending the radio call sign NRV on Morse code every 15 seconds followed by synchronizing signals. 

(Not 16812 kHz NRV or 16813 kHz NRV).

 

16.898.5 MHz 16898.5 kHz XSG Shanghai Radio, China coastal radio station ship to shore communications. Heard on 12 May 2009 at 1038 UTC signal strength 1 sending the radio call sign XSG once on Morse code followed by 3 synchronizing signals. This transmission format is repeated continuously. 

(Not 16898 kHz XSG or 16899 kHz XSG).

 

16.910 MHz 16.910 kHz HLJ, Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications. Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLW (call sign HLW sent 3 times). Heard on 11 May 2009 at 0218 UTC signal strength 1.  

 

17.130 MHz 17130 kHz HLW, Seoul Radio, South Korea coastal radio station ship to shore communications. 
Repeating the Morse code message: CQ (meaning “general call to any station” sent 3 times) de (meaning “this is” sent one time) HLW (call sign HLW sent 3 times). Heard on 11 May 2009 at 0214 UTC signal strength 7.

 

22.382 MHz 22.382 kHz NRV Guam Island, central Pacific Ocean, United States Coast Guard USCG coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 16 May 2009 at 0248 UTC signal strength 9 sending the radio call sign NRV on Morse code once followed by four synchronizing signals. This Morse code identification and digital sequence is repeated.

 

22.383.5 MHz 22383.5 kHz WLO Mobile Radio, city of Mobile, Alabama, USA coastal radio station ship to shore communications.

Heard on 12 May 2009 at 2337 UTC signal strength 1 sending the radio call sign WLO on Morse code 3 times followed by synchronizing signals for SITOR, AMTOR, PACTOR and PACTOR II digital radio communications. This transmission format is repeated continuously. 

(Not 22383 kHz WLO or 22384 kHz WLO).

 

28.262 MHz 28262 kHz VK2RSY amateur radio station in Dural, Northern Sydney, N.S.W., Australia.

Amateur Radio New South Wales, Australia is a 24 hour automatic radio beacon providing a signal for propagation “radio weather” research.

Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0430 UTC signal strength 9 plus 10db sending the radio call sign VK2RSY on Morse code every 40 seconds followed by a continuous unmodulated (no audio) radio frequency carrier wave.

 

 

Morse code on VHF (Very High Frequency) Radio.

 

50.288 MHz 50288 kHz VK2RHV amateur radio beacon station in Newcastle, N.S.W., Australia.

This is a 24 hour automatic radio beacon providing a signal for propagation “radio weather” research. Heard on 12 May 2009 at 2345 UTC signal strength 1 sending this message on Morse code “Beacon de VK2RHV Newcastle …” 10 second carrier, 4 “dits” followed again with the Morse code identification message. This transmission format is repeated continuously.

 

50.289 MHz 50289 kHz VK2RSY amateur radio station in Dural, Northern Sydney, N.S.W., Australia.

Amateur Radio New South Wales, Australia is a 24 hour automatic radio beacon providing a signal for propagation “radio weather” research. Heard on 9 May 2009 at 0423 UTC signal strength 3 sending the radio call sign VK2RSY on Morse code every 40 seconds followed by a continuous unmodulated (no audio) radio frequency carrier wave.

 

53.850 MHz 53850 kHz VK2RWI amateur radio repeater station in Dural, Northern Sydney, N.S.W., Australia.

Amateur Radio New South Wales, Australia maintains this 24 hour automatic radio repeater station to provide a free automatic relay station that retransmits the FM voice conversations of amateur radio mobile, handheld or home stations over a long distance in the 6 metre amateur radio band. The Morse code identification transmits the repeater call sign “VK2RWI” in Frequency Modulated Morse code (MCW).

 

 

Download more about Morse code-

International amateur radio abbreviations,
Emergency Morse code signal,
Urgency Morse code signals,
SIDA LOOSOO GAABIYO XEERKA CAALAMIGA AH EE AMITAR RAADIYOO.
All in Somalia radio course topic 07
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic07.doc 

International Q codes,
How to use the Q code,
Q CODKA CAALMIGA AH.
All in Somalia radio course topic 08
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic08.doc

What is the International Morse Code?
How does Morse code work?
Who invented the Morse code?
How do you learn the Morse code?
How do you hold a Morse code key?
List of the Morse code.
MORSE CODKA CAALMIGA AH.
All in Somalia radio course topic 09
https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-course/Somaliaradiocoursetopic09.doc

 

 USA on the 18 MHz band.

 

18.930 MHz 18930 kHz WYFR World Family Radio, Okeechobee, Florida, USA.

English to Europe and the Middle East. Heard on 13 May 2009 at 2125 UTC sign-off at 2145 UTC signal strength 7. 

 

18.980 MHz 18980 kHz WYFR World Family Radio, Okeechobee, Florida, USA.

Middle East language heard on 13 May 2009 at 2127 UTC sign-off at 2145 UTC signal strength 5. 

 

Voice of America on 18650 kHz broadcasting to Myanmar (Burma).

18.650 MHz 18650 kHz Voice of America heard using AM in an Asian language broadcast on 7 May 2009 at 0010 UTC. The station signed off at 0029 UTC with the English language announcement "This program has come to you from ... (fade out)... in Washington." Signal strength 7 and fading into the noise.

 

Heard on 12 May 2009 with an AM broadcast from 2345 to 0029 UTC with "VOA" announcements and VOA theme music signal strength 7 and fading into the noise. 

 

Heard on 13 May 2009 with an AM broadcast sign-on at 2159 UTC "This is the Voice of America Washington DC" then an Asian language till sign-off at 2230 UTC signal strength 6 and fading into the noise.

 

Heard on 13 May 2009 to come on air at 2259 UTC in the middle of an Asian language program. The transmitter program (and carrier signal) dropped out a few times (transmitter problem) until 2301 UTC when the transmission was stable. At 2329 UTC the Voice of America Burmese website address was announced followed by mentions of "Myanmar" after 2331 UTC. This transmission ends at 0029 UTC.   

 

 

China on short wave radio.

China jamming incoming "subversive" short wave radio broadcasts.

China using music to block "subversive" short wave radio broadcasts.

 

18.000 MHz, 18000 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
Heard on 8 April 2009 at 0240 UTC signal strength 7 to 8. Music was different to that heard at the same time on 13.970 MHz (signal strength 5), 15.600 MHz (signal strength 6) and 18.830 MHz (signal strength 5 - 7). 4 transmitters on the air.

18.320 MHz, 18320 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
Could this be a Chinese short wave transmitter manufacturer testing a newly built short wave
radio transmitter? That was my first thought when I heard this transmission.
23 April 2009 at 0855 UTC (signal strength 8) and
24 April 2009 at 0310 UTC (signal strength 8) and
25 April 2009 at 2300 UTC (signal strength 9) and 0035 UTC (signal strength 9) all withexcellent AM audio quality.

11.300 MHz, 11300 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
This is the same station that Sam Voron VK2BVS reported hearing in Sydney on 18.320 MHz. Heard 24 April 2009 at 0910 UTC (signal strength 7) with excellent AM audio quality.
Please email website of Chinese short wave transmitter manufacturers.
These test transmissions are a great advertisement for the excellent quality of China short
wave broadcasting equipment.
27 April 2009. Heard at 2335 UTC (signal strength 7). Only one transmitter was on air.

13.970 MHz, 13970 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
25 April 2009 heard at 0540 UTC (signal strength 7) and at the same time on 18.320 MHz (signal strength 8) both with excellent AM audio quality.
This indicates that China is testing 2 short wave transmitters.
26 April 2009 heard at 0540 UTC signal strength 8 on 13.970 MHz and at the same time on 18.320 MHz (signal strength 8). Some reports say that these broadcasts are a jamming signal however their duration is sometimes only for short periods, stopping and reappearing later. For example at 0155 UTC 13.970 MHz had stopped while 18.320 MHz (signal strength 8) continued.

15.820 MHz, 15820 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
25 April 2009 heard at 0640 UTC (signal strength 9) and at the same time on 18.320 MHz
(signal strength 9) and on 13.970 MHz (signal strength 8).
All 3 transmitters had excellent AM audio quality.
At 0752 UTC 15.820 MHz was signal strength 8, 13.970 MHz was signal strength 9 and 18.320 MHz was signal strength 8.
This indicates that China is testing 3 short wave transmitters.
These frequencies are outside the short wave broadcast band indicating that the antennas are broadband and maybe also under test.
A possibility is that a new short wave radio installation is under test in China. Some reports say that these broadcasts are a jamming signal.

8.400 MHz, 8400 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.

9.000 MHz, 9000 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
25 April 2009 heard at 1150 UTC on 8.400 MHz (signal strength 9) and at the same time on 9.000 MHz (signal strength 9) and on 11.300 MHz (signal strength 8). Some reports say that these broadcasts are a jamming signal however their duration is sometimes only for short
periods, stopping and reappearing later. Possibly to hear if anti-Chinese broadcasts are continuing on the frequency.
26 April 2009 heard at 1450 UTC on 8.400 MHz (signal strength 9) and at the same time on 9.000 MHz (signal strength 9).

Below on the evening of 26 April 2009 the following observations were interesting.

17.300 MHz, 17300 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.

15.840 MHz, 15840 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
From 0655 UTC to sign off at 0700 UTC 17.300 MHz (signal strength 7), 15.840 MHz (signal strength 8) and 18.320 MHz (signal strength 8). After 0700 UTC 17.300 MHz transmits a blank carrier while the other two have stopped. At 0703 UTC all stations are back with Chinese music. At 0730 UTC it is noticed that the Chinese music on 18.320 MHz is different to the Chinese music on 17.300 MHz and 15.840 MHz.

16.800 MHz, 16800 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
At 0726 UTC there are 5 Chinese short wave transmitters with Chinese music. 4 have the same music 16.800 MHz (signal strength 8), 17.300 MHz (signal strength 7), 13.970 MHz (signal strength 8) and 15.840 MHz (signal strength 8). 18.320 MHz (signal strength 8) is transmitting different Chinese music suggesting that it might be in a different location in China.

15.720 MHz, 15720 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
On 27 April 2009 at 0720 UTC heard on 15.720 MHz (signal strength 8), 17.300 MHz (signal strength 7) and with different Chinese music on 18.320 MHz (signal strength 7).
All transmissions stopped at 0759 UTC but 17.300 MHz continued to transmit a blank (no modulation) carrier.
At 0803 UTC 15.720 MHz (signal strength 8) and 17.300 MHz (signal strength 7) re-started transmission with the same Chinese music.
At 0804 UTC 18.320 MHz (signal strength 7) re-started transmission with different Chinese music.
In all the above observations no other station has been heard in the background to suggest that these are jamming transmissions.

The American Radio Relay League ARRL (Ham radio organisation in the USA) reports that the German telecom authority Bundesnetzagentur used radio direction finding to locate similar Chinese music transmissions from a short wave transmitting station at Hainan Island in Hainan Sheng Province, China.

18.320 MHz, 18320 kHz weak station with chinese talking heard under the unmodulated carrier of the chinese music station on 28 April 2009 at 0002 UTC. Is this voice broadcast from Taiwan beamed to Beijing? 

15.600 MHz, 15600 kHz Chinese music with no voice announcements.
On 28 April 2009 music starts at 0004 UTC on 15.600 MHz (signal strength 7), 13.970 MHz (signal strength 8) and 18.320 MHz (signal strength 9).

 

Manufacturers of Short Wave AM broadcast equipment at any power level (very small or large) are welcome to Email their information.

Manufacturers of AM Short Wave linear amplifiers from 4 kW pep and up are welcome to Email their information.

 

Radio Australia broadcasting on Short Wave Radio all day and all night to the Fiji Islands after their FM radio stations were closed. 

15 April 2009.

Today FM radio listeners in Fiji cannot hear Radio Australia on FM relay stations because the Fiji Government has ordered them closed.

Radio Australia is broadcasting 24 hours every day from Australia to the people of the Fiji Islands in the South Pacific Ocean using Short Wave Radio on the following times and frequencies.

1400-1800 UTC on 5.995 MHz (49 metre band) and 7.240 MHz (41 metre band).

1600-2000 UTC on 9.710 MHz (31 metre band).
1700-2000 UTC on 9.580 MHz (31 metre band).
1700-2100 UTC on 11.880 MHz (25 metre band).
1800-2000 UTC on 7.240 MHz (41 metre band).
2000-2200 UTC on 11.650 MHz and 11.660 MHz (25 metre bands).
2100-2200 UTC on 12.080 MHz (25 metre band).
2100-2300 UTC on 13.630 MHz (22 metre band) and 15.515 MHz (19 metre band).
2200-0000 UTC on 15.230 MHz (19 metre band) and 17.785 MHz (16 metre band).
2300-0900 UTC on 12.080 MHz (25 metre band).
2300-0200 UTC on 17.795 MHz (16 metre band).
0000-0800 UTC on 15.240 MHz (19 metre band).
0200-0700 UTC on 15.515 MHz (19 metre band).
0500-0800 UTC on 15.160 MHz (19 metre band).
0700-0900 UTC on 13.630 MHz (22 metre band).
0800-1400 UTC on 9.580 MHz (31 metre band).
0800-1600 UTC on 9.590 MHz (31 metre band).
1100-1400 UTC on 6.020 MHz (49 metre band).
1100-1200 UTC on 12.080 MHz (25 metre band).

 

 

North Korea reports that its first space satellite is broadcasting songs on 470 MHz in the UHF radio band.

7 April 2009.

North Korea satellite should be able to be heard on any ordinary UHF scanner radio receiver.

 

North Korea said satellite 'Kwangmyongsong-2' had been placed in orbit and that the satellite was transmitting data and the ‘Song of General Kim Il Sung’ and ‘Song of General Kim Jong Il’ on 470 MHz in the UHF radio band.

 

Anyone with an ordinary FM scanner on 470 MHz should scan between the frequencies of 398.000 to 405.000 MHz.

If your radio cannot scan then put your UHF receiver on 470.000 MHz FM.

Use a simple vertical antenna.

Keep listening or scanning 24 hours so you can hear it if or when it orbits over your part of Earth.

 

If this launch is confirmed then keep listening continuously for the next few days in the hope that the satellite will orbit over your part of the world.

Let me know your result and I will pass that information here.

 

On 24 April 1970 the first Chinese satellite was launched into Earth orbit transmitting data and the music “The East is Red” on 20.004 MHz HF using AM on short wave radio.

Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A in Sydney, Australia used an ordinary short wave radio receiver and a horizontal wire for the antenna. It was excellent reception and the same should be possible on UHF.

 

Summery as at 8 May 2009.

Authorities in North Korea reported hearing these broadcasts however by the time the frequency was known in the outside world no other reports of these broadcasts were received.  

 

 

 

Radio Hargeisa, Somaliland.

1st April 2009

 

Radio Hargeisa, Somaliland is back on short wave radio with a big signal in Sydney, Australia. See page 17. 

 

 

Success for all at United Nations meetings.

Changes to the 7.100 to 7.200 MHz Short Wave radio band.

29 March 2009.

 

The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) represents all amateur radio operators at the United Nations (UN) International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

 

Short Wave Radio broadcasters have worked with Amateur Radio operators at the United Nations ITU to achieve benefits for both.

 

As of 29 March 2009 Broadcasters worldwide relocated (changed their frequency) to an expanded 40 metre Short Wave broadcast band and created a new 43 metre Short Wave broadcast band.

 

As of 29 March 2009 Amateur Radio operators worldwide expanded the 40 metre ham radio two way communication band from 7.000 to 7.200 MHz.

 

Amateur Radio operators in Somalia, Australia, New Zealand, America and some other countries can also use 7.200 to 7.300 MHz shared with broadcasting stations. See page 17.

 

 

 

 

World Amateur Radio Day on 18 April 2009.

 

Amateur Radio operators often join as part of Government delegations to United Nations (UN) International Telecommunications Union (ITU) meetings to assist with technical advice that results in better use of the radio spectrum for national and international broadcasting, communications, development and space research.

 

The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) encourages Amateur Radio operators worldwide to meet with their Government radio licensing agency on the occasion of World Amateur Radio Day.

 

World Amateur Radio Day is an opportunity to meet with Government officials and the general public to let them know how they can use the voluntary services of amateur radio operators locally and worldwide in the preparations for Disaster communications and emergency communications.

 

Organize something a few days before or after if 18 April 2009 is not possible in your situation.

 

HAPPY World Amateur Radio Day! 

 

Summery as at 10 May 2009.

In Lebanon “Al Balad” (the echo of the country) newspaper had a full page article about World Amateur Radio Day.

 

See http://www.albaladonline.com/html/story.php?sid=59242

or

See on PDF: http://ral.org.lb/images/RAL_Files/al-balad-amateur-radio-day-2009.pdf

 

 

 

Your Email reports and comments are welcome.

 

 

 

INDEX-
Click on the yellow links below.

 

NABDAADI RAADIYO HAM SOOMAALIYA. RAADIYOO CAAWINTA AADANAHOO DHAN.

1. Somalia

 

RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYEED.

2. Somalia ham radio

 

SHATIGA RAADIYAHA AMITARKA AH EE ABIDKIIS KAJIRAYA DALKA SOMALIYA.

3. Somalia ham radio license

 

SHATIYADA SOOMAALIYA AY SIINAYSO AJAANIBTA AMITAR RADIYOWGA AAN XADID NAYN.

4. Somalia visitor ham radio license

 

ISGAARSIINTA EE RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYEED.

5. Somalia ham radio regulations

 

WAAXDA ISGAARSIINTA SOOMAALIYA.

6. Somalia amateur radio licensing authority

 

KOORSADA RAADYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYA.

7. Somalia ham radio course

 

LAMBARADA WICITAANKA EE RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYA.

8. Somalia ham radio callsigns

 

HORGALAHA CALAAMADDA WACITAANKA EE AMATEUR RADIO. WAXAY MUUJINAYSAA WADANKA.

9. Ham radio prefixes

 

JIMCIYADA RAADIYAHA AMITARKA EE SOOMAALIYA. 

10. SARFEN

 

WARISGAARSIINTA DEGDEGA AH EE AMITAR RAADYOOWGAEE SOOMAALIYA.

11. Somalia emergency network

 

SHARAX SHAQADA UU QABTO BOTON WALBA OO KAMID AH WARLALIS QABTAHA.

12. Holiday help in Somalia

 

BOOQDAYAASHA USOCDA SOOMAALIYA. 

13. Somalia radio holiday

 

BOOQO SOOMAALIYA.

14. Travel to Somalia

 

RADIO GAALKACYO, RADIO GALKACYO, RADIO GALKAACYO, RADIO GAALKAACYO, RADIO GALCAIO.

RADIO GAALKACYO 2. 
 

FM IYO SW RAADIYO EE SOOMAALIYA, SOOMAALILAND IYO JABUUTI.

 
RADIO HAGE SOOMAALIYA. 
 

KHARIIDADA SOOMAALIYA, KHARIIDADA SOOMAALILAND, KHARIIDADA PUNTLAND, KHARIIDADA GALMUDUG, KHARIIDADA ORGADEN, KHARIIDADA BARI XABASHI, KHARIIDADA WAQOOYI BARI KIINYA, KHARIIDADA KOONFUR ERITREA IYO KHARIIDADA JABUUTI.

 

HALKANI WAA RADIO 1993-2009.

20. Radio broadcasting in Somalia 1993-2009.

 

IDAACAD SW RAADIYO U SOOMAALIYA.

 
AMITAR RAADIYO EE AFRIKA.
22. Amateur Radio in Africa
 

Contact: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A.
 
 

 

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