Somalia updates

Islam and Somalia.

9. Ham radio prefixes

 
Amateur Radio call sign prefixes for each country.
 
INTERNATIONAL CALLSIGN AMATEUR RADIO PREFIXES.
Updated
29 May 2009.

Here is the 2009 list of every country and their radio call sign prefix. 

Additions or corrections to the prefix list are very welcome.

All items on this website are MS Word DOC or PDF with no virus or related items attached. Written and uploaded by Sam Voron VK2BVS webmaster.

 
Click the attachment (1.8 MB) in yellow below to download. 
Download Amateur radio prefixes:

https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/amateur-radio-prefixes/AmateurRadioprefixes.doc

 

 

 

9. HORGALAHA CALAAMADDA WACITAANKA EE AMATEUR RADIO.  WAXAY MUUJINAYSAA WADANKA.  
 
The call sign of every ham radio station starts with letters or numbers called the prefix. 
Every country has its own call sign prefix.  

 

Questions about Somalia.

Question from the USA about Somalia.

Somalia Ham Radio transmitter power and Somalia Ham Radio frequencies.


28 May 2009.

Somalia question: David, call sign WW0W in Ridgecrest, California, USA portable in Greece is interested in the 3,000 Watts pep (3 kW) transmitter power allowed to Somalia Amateur Radio stations.

David is also interested in the Somalia Amateur Radio Super Low Frequency (SLF), Ultra Low Frequency (ULF), Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) band on 0 to 9 kHz (100,000 metre band) and the Somalia Amateur Radio Low Frequency (LF) bands on 70 kHz to 90 kHz (4,000 metre band) and 130 kHz to 190 kHz (2,000 metre band) and the Somalia Medium Frequency band (MF) on 495 kHz to 526 kHz (600 metre band).

David said I was only aware of the Low Frequency (LF) 137 kHz (2000 meter band) in International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 1 (Europe) and the no license needed 160 kHz to 190 kHz LowFer band in Region 2 (USA), but I have never heard of these East African bands. Can you tell me more about these bands and the 3 kW PEP power output limits? Are they not agreed upon by the ITU (i.e. are they East African bands only)? Very interesting!


Somalia answer: Hello David,

Thank you for the great questions.

The maximum allowed power of 3,000 Watts pep (3 kW) and the bands from Super Low Frequency (SLF) to Medium Frequency (MF) exist in Somalia only.

In 2004 Somalia made available additional ham radio bands, more ham radio activities, increased Amateur radio transmitter power and expanded the scope for scientific Amateur Radio research.

Ham Radio in Somalia has also expanded its technology training to include both communications and broadcasting.

Somalia Amateur Radio is designed in a way that makes Somalia the best country for Amateur Radio education, training, research and experimentation.

Somali Ham Radio has also been designed to attract visitors from overseas to come to Somalia and help the Somali people in the development of the Somalia Amateur Radio Service.

You can download the Ministers announcement with all the bands and activities that are available to both the radio hams in Somalia and ham radio visitors to Somalia.

Download Visit Somalia 2009 on: https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-visitor-amateur-radio-license

International Telecommunication Union (ITU) agreements are worldwide agreements however individual countries are still free to make their own variations if it is on a non-interference basis. Operating on a non-interference basis means that one can operate on certain frequencies as long as there are no complaints of interference caused to stations or radio services that operate under ITU frequency allocations.

Here are some examples of differences between ITU agreements and individual countries in the Amateur Radio Service.

In the 1950’s Morse code was an ITU requirement for all ham radio operation below 144 MHz however over the years various countries made their own decisions on a “non interference basis.”

The Australian licensing authority allowed Radio Amateurs who did not have Morse code knowledge to use frequency bands below 144 MHz first as low as 50 MHz and later down to 29 MHz while Japan allowed Ham Radio HF operation without Morse code knowledge on a “non interference basis.”

These decisions were on a basis that the possibility of interference to ITU frequency planning was minimal.

In 2009 Morse code is not an international ITU compulsory examination requirement for obtaining the Amateur Radio license but a few countries still have this Morse code ham radio examination requirement (although most countries have removed all Morse code exam requirements for ham radio station licenses).

In 1976 the 27 MHz (11 metre band) was an Australian ham radio band although it was not an international ham radio band.

In 1977 the Australian 27 MHz band was shared with the first Australian CB (Citizen’s Band) radio stations.

A statement from the Australian communications Minister allowed Amateur Radio Stations to remain on 27 MHz during 1977 because of a delay in the issuing of CB radio licenses.

By 1978 the 27 MHz (11 metre band) became an exclusive CB radio band shared only with Industrial, Scientific and Medical emissions.

In 2009 Somalia has a ham radio band from 610 MHz to 624 MHz and New Zealand is 614 MHz to 622 MHz. This is not an ITU international Amateur Radio allocation.

In 2009 Somalia has a ham radio band from 26.100 MHz to 27.995 MHz and New Zealand is 26.950 MHz to 27.300 MHz. This is not an ITU international Amateur Radio allocation.

See the New Zealand Ham Radio frequencies on: http://www.nzart.org.nz/maps/2008/2008-bp1-2-bw.pdf

See the Somalia Ham Radio frequencies by downloading Visit Somalia 2009 on: https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio/somalia-amateur-radio-license

It is interesting to look at different countries and find the ones that offer more than is available elsewhere for local and visiting ham radio experimenters.

Regards,

Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A.

 

 
  

 

 

American Radio Relay League (ARRL).

The national organization representing Amateur Radio Operators in the USA.


Regarding Amateur Radio operations in Somalia.



From: DX information

Subject: [DX-NEWS] Ohio/Penn, USA,
DX Bulletin #672

Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004


DXCC NEWS.


Bill Moore, NC1L, ARRL DXCC Manager, informs OPDX of the following Somalia 6O/T5 operations:

"Effective immediately, the ARRL DXCC Branch will accept QSLs for operation taking place in Somaliland (North western) and Puntland (North east) autonomous areas as well as the Southern and Central areas of Somalia.

Operations possessing written permission from any recognized authority that is acknowledged to be in control of a particular region will be accredited.

These QSLs will count for the Somali Democratic Republic (Somalia).

QSLs for past operations will be accepted where proper documentation has been submitted. This is subject to change based on future developments in Somalia."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Your comments about Somalia ham radio. 


27 March 2009.


From Veke (callsign OH2MCN) in Finland.


Hi Sam,

Extremely informative and good web pages for Somalia 6O!


I have forwarded it to the ARRL (American Radio Relay League, the organisation for the 600,000 amateur radio operators in the USA. They keep this information to help radio amateurs who want to have radio holidays in the different countries around the world).


Best 73 (best regards), 

Veke, OH2MCN in Finland.

 

 

 

 
 
Abdullahi Hersi Mahamud.
Somalia Amateur Radio call sign 6O0HX
Founder member of Radio Galkayo SW.
At the Radio Galkayo Amateur Radio Club, Galkayo, Somalia in 2004.
 

 

1993 Radio student Abdullahi Hersi Mahamud, 6O0HX.

1993 Completed the Amateur Radio license course.

1993 Requested and received the ham radio call sign 6O0HX.

1993 Foundation member of Radio Galkayo.

2004 Foundation member of SARFEN.

2005 Golis telephone company.

2005 - 2007 Program producer Radio Galkayo 6.980MHz SW & FM.

 


INDEX-
Click on the yellow links below.

 

NABDAADI RAADIYO HAM SOOMAALIYA. RAADIYOO CAAWINTA AADANAHOO DHAN.

1. Somalia

 

RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYEED.

2. Somalia ham radio

 

SHATIGA RAADIYAHA AMITARKA AH EE ABIDKIIS KAJIRAYA DALKA SOMALIYA.

3. Somalia ham radio license

 

SHATIYADA SOOMAALIYA AY SIINAYSO AJAANIBTA AMITAR RADIYOWGA AAN XADID NAYN.

4. Somalia visitor ham radio license

 

ISGAARSIINTA EE RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYEED.

5. Somalia ham radio regulations

 

WAAXDA ISGAARSIINTA SOOMAALIYA.

6. Somalia amateur radio licensing authority

 

KOORSADA RAADYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYA.

7. Somalia ham radio course

 

LAMBARADA WICITAANKA EE RAADIYAHA AMITARKA SOOMAALIYA.

8. Somalia ham radio callsigns

 

HORGALAHA CALAAMADDA WACITAANKA EE AMATEUR RADIO. WAXAY MUUJINAYSAA WADANKA.

You are here 9. Ham radio prefixes

 

JIMCIYADA RAADIYAHA AMITARKA EE SOOMAALIYA. 

10. SARFEN

 

WARISGAARSIINTA DEGDEGA AH EE AMITAR RAADYOOWGAEE SOOMAALIYA.

11. Somalia emergency network

 

SHARAX SHAQADA UU QABTO BOTON WALBA OO KAMID AH WARLALIS QABTAHA.

12. Holiday help in Somalia

 

BOOQDAYAASHA USOCDA SOOMAALIYA. 

13. Somalia radio holiday

 

BOOQO SOOMAALIYA.

14. Travel to Somalia

 

RADIO GAALKACYO, RADIO GALKACYO, RADIO GALKAACYO, RADIO GAALKAACYO, RADIO GALCAIO.

RADIO GAALKACYO 2. 
 

FM IYO SW RAADIYO EE SOOMAALIYA, SOOMAALILAND IYO JABUUTI.

17. Somalia short wave radio broadcasts
 
RADIO HAGE SOOMAALIYA. 
 

KHARIIDADA SOOMAALIYA, KHARIIDADA SOOMAALILAND, KHARIIDADA PUNTLAND, KHARIIDADA GALMUDUG, KHARIIDADA ORGADEN, KHARIIDADA BARI XABASHI, KHARIIDADA WAQOOYI BARI KIINYA, KHARIIDADA KOONFUR ERITREA IYO KHARIIDADA JABUUTI.

 

HALKANI WAA RADIO 1993-2009.

20. Radio broadcasting in Somalia 1993-2009.

 

IDAACAD SW RAADIYO U SOOMAALIYA.

21. SW broadcasting to Somalia.
 
AMITAR RAADIYO EE AFRIKA.
22. Amateur Radio in Africa
 
AMITAR RAADIYO EE BARI DHEX.
23. Amateur Radio in the Middle East 

 

Contact: Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A.

 

 


The same Amateur Radio Prefixes above can also be downloaded from the attachment below -

All items on this website are MS Word DOC or PDF with no virus or related items attached. Written and uploaded by Sam Voron VK2BVS webmaster.

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ĉ
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Sam Voron,
May 29, 2009, 4:55 AM