Part One, Chapter One

NUCLEAR ATTACK

A nuclear attack against the United States would take a high toll of lives. But our losses would be much less if people were prepared to meet the emergency, knew what actions to take, and took them.

A nationwide civil defense system now exists in the United States, and is being enlarged and improved constantly. The heart of this system is fallout shelter to protect people from the radioactive fallout that would result from a nuclear attack. The system also includes warning and communications networks, preparations to measure fallout radiation, control centers to direct lifesaving and recovery operations, emergency broadcasting stations, local governments organized for emergency operations, large numbers of citizens trained in emergency skills, and U.S. military forces available to help civil authorities and the public in a time of emergency.

If an enemy should threaten to attack the United States, you would not be alone. The entire Nation would be mobilizing to repulse the attack, destroy the enemy, and hold down our own loss of life. Much assistance would be available to you-from local, State and Federal governments, from the U.S. armed forces units in your area, and from your neighbors and fellow-Americans. If an attack should come, many lives would be saved through effective emergency preparations and actions.

You can give yourself and your family a much better chance of surviving and recovering from a nuclear attack if you will take time now to:

  • Understand the dangers you would face in an attack.
  • Make your own preparations for an attack.
  • Learn what actions you should take at the time of attack.

Chapter 1

CHECKLIST OF EMERGENCY ACTIONS

KNOW YOUR LOCAL EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN

  • Find out from your local government your local plan for emergency action.
  • Determine the specific actions you and members of your family are expected to take.

UNDERSTAND NUCLEAR ATTACK HAZARDS (See Chapter 2, page 9 )

On the widespread threat of fallout, remember:

  • The most dangerous period is the first 24 hours after fallout arrives. But you might have to use fallout shelter for up to two weeks.
  • Highly dangerous amounts of fallout are visible. They look like particles of sand or salt.
  • There is little danger that adults could inhale or swallow enough fallout particles to hurt them. Small children, however, could be injured by drinking contaminated water or milk.
  • A person exposed to fallout radiation does not become radioac tive. Radiation sickness is not contagious; one person cannot "catch it" from another person.

KNOW THE ATTACK WARNING SIGNAL (See Chapter 3, page 17)

  • On outdoor warning devices, the Attack Warning Signal is a 3- to 5-minute wavering sound, or a series of short blasts on whistles or horns.
  • This signal means: An enemy attack against the United States has been detected. Take protective action. (This signal has no other meaning, and will be used for no other purpose.)
  • On warning, don't use the phone. Get information from radio.

KNOW THE LOCATION OF FALLOUT SHELTER ( See Chapter 4, page 23 )

  • Public shelters are marked like this.
  • Good shelters can be prepared in homes with
  • basements.

IF NO SHELTER IS AVAILABLE, IMPROVISE PROTECTION (See Chapter 5, page 33)

Remember:

  • A basement corner below ground level, or a storm cellar, is the best place to improvise fallout protection.
  • For the best possible protection, use heavy and dense materials for shielding.

PREPARE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES (See Chapter 6, page 39)

Especially important are:

  • Water and other liquids.
  • Food requiring no cooking.
  • Special medicines.

CONSERVE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES; MAINTAIN SANITATION (See Chapter 7, page 45)

REDUCE FIRE HAZARDS (See Chapter 8, page 51)

KNOW THE BASICS OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE (See Chapter 9, page 55)

If no doctor is available, especially important are actions to:

  • Restore breathing.
  • Stop serious bleeding.
  • Treat for shock.
  • Treat broken bones and burns.

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