40% - C: My top 5 stories

Task 4a: Write a few stories about things you have done 

If you have not (mostly) completed E2: My Top 5 interests, please do so before working on this web page. You might want to open a new browser window to display E2: My Top 5 interests to provide you some ideas while you compose your stories.
 
Below are five template areas for five stories. You don't have to write them all at once, but over the next few months and years you should write at list five: the more the better, if they cover the spectrum of your activities. Think about things you have done to give you joy and a feeling of satisfaction. CUT/PASTE your stories so the most important story is at the top, the next most important story follows, etc. You might want to keep older stories on this page or create a new page for them for future reference, reflection and memories.

Why? Stories are an excellent source of the elements you will need to (re)define your LifeWork in Phase 2: Career exploration to (re)define my LifeWork

Use this template for each story

  1. Review your list of E2: My Top 5 interests for story ideas or think of a situation, concern, problem, project, etc. and the action you took.
  2. Be specific about the abilities, knowledge, skills, tool and technologies, and work activities you used and the work context. (There are details and examples below.)
  3. Describe the result you achieved. How satisfied were you with the work and the result?
  4. Include who else was involved, and where and when the story took place.
  5. What result did you achieve.
  6. How satisfied were you with your work and the result.

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[Replace this with a short (max. 3 word) story title]

(Replace this with a short story. COPY the template above and PASTE it here to help you write your story.

If you elect to write a long story, consider summarizing the basics here, then creating a new page for the full story and adding a link to it here.

When complete go to Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories.

Consider making a recurring annual Google Calendar event to send you an email to remind you to write more stories.)


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    [Replace this with a short (max. 3 word) story title]

    (Replace this with a short story. COPY the template above and PASTE it here to help you write your story.

    If you elect to write a long story, consider summarizing the basics here, then creating a new page for the full story and adding a link to it here.

    When complete go to Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories.

    Consider making a recurring annual Google Calendar event to send you an email to remind you to write more stories.)


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    [Replace this with a short (max. 3 word) story title]

    (Replace this with a short story. COPY the template above and PASTE it here to help you write your story.

    If you elect to write a long story, consider summarizing the basics here, then creating a new page for the full story and adding a link to it here.

    When complete go to Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories.

    Consider making a recurring annual Google Calendar event to send you an email to remind you to write more stories.)


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    [Replace this with a short (max. 3 word) story title]

    (Replace this with a short story. COPY the template above and PASTE it here to help you write your story.

    If you elect to write a long story, consider summarizing the basics here, then creating a new page for the full story and adding a link to it here.

    When complete go to Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories.

    Consider making a recurring annual Google Calendar event to send you an email to remind you to write more stories.)


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    [Replace this with a short (max. 3 word) story title]

    (Replace this with a short story. COPY the template above and PASTE it here to help you write your story.

    If you elect to write a long story, consider summarizing the basics here, then creating a new page for the full story and adding a link to it here.

    When complete go to Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories.

    Consider making a recurring annual Google Calendar event to send you an email to remind you to write more stories.)


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    Task 4b: Complete the following analysis of your stories

    There are hundreds of pieces of key information about yourself and thousands of pieces of key information about the world of work that you need to research, collect and prioritize now and over your lifetime, if you want to 1) know who you are, so you can 2) (re)define and 3) (re)find your LifeWork.

    After you have created one or more stories, read and analyze each to extract the abilities, knowledge, skills, tool and technologies, work activities and work context you used in them. It may not be clear to you now, and you may not know what to extract, but give it a try. Do the best you can. It will be clearer when you go to the next set of tasks to begin defining your LifeWork.  I've added a few examples under each descriptor.

    NOTE: Click here to learn how to quickly and easily COPY/PASTE text. It will save your hours of typing!


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    Abilities

    Abilities are enduring attributes that influence your performance. Click here to view four (4) categories of abilities listed in the O*NET Content Model.  COPY/REPLACE the following ability terms from O*NET with those that you used in your stories above.  Prioritize your list.

    1. Originality — The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
    2. Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
    3. Time Sharing — The ability to shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources).
    4. Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
    5. Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.

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    Knowledge

    Knowledge is organized sets of principles and facts applying in general domains.  Click here to view a list of O*NET knowledge descriptors in the O*NET Content Model.  COPY/REPLACE the following ability terms from O*NET with those that you used in your stories above.  Prioritize your list.
    1. Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
    2. Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
    3. Communications and Media — Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
    4. Personnel and Human Resources — Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
    5. Building and Construction — Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

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    Skills

    Skills are developed capacities that facilitate learning or the more rapid acquisition of knowledge. Click here to view six (6) categories of O*NET skills descriptors and COPY/REPLACE the following with those skills you used in your stories above.  Prioritize your list.

    1. Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
    2. Systems Analysis — Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
    3. Programming — Writing computer programs for various purposes.
    4. Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
    5. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
    If you want to do further research into three other types of skill sets, click here.

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    Tools and/or Technologies:

    List below all of the tools and/or technologies you used.
    1. HTML
    2. Google Sites
    3. (Replace this with the list of tools and/or technologies you used in story #3.)
    4. (Replace this with the list of tools and/or technologies you used in story #4.)
    5. (Replace this with the list of tools and/or technologies you used in story #5.)


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    Work activities

    List below all of the

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    Work context

    List below of the


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    Task 4c: Ideas for my dream job(s) - my LifeWork

    (As you analyze your stories and list the key elements above, replace this sentence with your thoughts about how you would (re)combine some of those elements to (re)design or (re)define your Dream Job(s).  You might want to construct a Mind Map (Wikipedia) like the one to the far right to help you collect and organize your thoughts.)


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    Next task

    When you have completed at least five stories, you are almost ready to work on your My LifeWork Details. which will help you select occupations that might be your LifeWork or (re)define it. But before you go there, please click on ONET to learn about a very powerful Department of Labor platform that is a data base (DB) of over 1000 occupations. That DB is used in almost all Internet based career information delivery systems. 

    When you are familiar with ONET, go to your My LifeWork Details web page.



      Example

      I chose to construct my short project story after I completed all the elements of my first story.

      Developing LifeWork Planning Services (LWPS)

      1. Identify the situation, concern, problem, project, etc.: Problem: Very few people ever acquire career planning and decision making skills and even fewer take the time to (re)search, 2) (re)define and 3) (re)find their LifeWork..
      2. Include who else was involved, and where and when the story took place: My qwest to develop LWPS started the 2nd day of a career development workshop when I was sorting my values, interests and skills with paper and pencil. Sorting would have ben much faster on a computer. And since I was working for IBM, I was preplexed.
      3. What actions did you take.
        1. What skills did you use: programming, writing, designing, developing, testing, interviewing,
        2. What tools and/or technologies did you use: HTML, Dreamweaver, Elgg, MySQL, computer, Internet
        3. List the tasks:
      4. What result did you achieve: LWPS blog and GTs
      5. How satisfied were you with your work and the result: Very satisfied for many accomplishments but

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      http://lifeworkps.com/hubbard/weblog/889.html
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