Welcome to the

TAMU Math Circle!

Welcome to TAMU Math Circle!

The Texas A&M Math Circle is an outreach activity that brings 5th - 12th grade students into direct contact with mathematical professionals in an informal setting to work on interesting topics in mathematics. The goal is to help students become passionate about math. Our instructors range from professors and graduate students at Texas A&M to experts from industry, all of whom are eager to share with students their passion for mathematics and its applications.

Meetings will be held online via Zoom. For the Spring 2022 semester, we will have meetings on 2/5, 2/12, 2/19, 3/5, 3/26, 4/9, 4/23, 4/30, 5/14. These are all Saturdays.

Daily schedule:

Discovery Learning Sessions:

  • 12.00 - 1.30 (Beginner)

  • 1.45 - 3.15 (Intermediate)

  • 3.30 - 5.00 (Advanced)

Problem Solving Sessions:

  • 12.00 - 1.30 (Advanced)

  • 1.45 - 3.15 (Beginner)

  • 3.30 - 5.00 (Intermediate)

We will have two simultaneous Zoom Meetings open from 12.00 to 5.00 PM on Saturdays; one meeting for Discovery Learning, and another meeting for Problem Solving. Students who wish to attend both discovery learning and problem solving activities will need to move from one meeting to the other during the 15 minute transition period.

Next Meeting (May 14, 2022):

May 14, 2022

Discovery Learning: Beginner Group (12.00 - 1.30 PM) (Pre-Algebra and below)

Speaker: Logan Knudsen (TAMU)

Title: Double Latin Squares

Abstract: We will inspect a variation of the traditional Latin Square, known as the Double Latin Square, where the player will attempt to arrange n colors and n numbers such that each row and column has only one of each color and number.


Discovery Learning: Intermediate Group (1.45 - 3.15 PM) (in Algebra I or above)

Speaker: Dr. Maurice Rojas (TAMU)

Title: Dividing, conquering, and detecting compositeness

Abstract: "Divide and conquer" is a useful trick in many important algorithms. We'll see two examples: One coming from computational geometry and the other from cryptography. The first example is the computation of convex hulls in the plane (a construction useful in robotics). The second example involves deciding whether a number is composite (i.e., not prime) *without* factoring the number. This turns out to be useful for securely sending credit card numbers over the internet.


Discovery Learning: Advanced Group (3.30 - 5.00 PM) (in Algebra II or above)

Speaker: Dr. Maurice Rojas (TAMU)

Title: Dividing, conquering, and detecting compositeness

Abstract: "Divide and conquer" is a useful trick in many important algorithms. We'll see two examples: One coming from computational geometry and the other from cryptography. The first example is the computation of convex hulls in the plane (a construction useful in robotics). The second example involves deciding whether a number is composite (i.e., not prime) *without* factoring the number. This turns out to be useful for securely sending credit card numbers over the internet.


Problem-Solving: Beginner Group (1.45 - 3.15 PM)

Instructor: Dr. Irina Bobkova (Texas A&M), Dr. Guangbo Xu (Texas A&M) Dr. Peyam Tabrizian (Texas A&M)


Problem-Solving: Intermediate Group (3.30 - 5.00 PM)

Instructor: Dr. Jinmin Wang (Texas A&M), Dr. Rodrigo Matos (Texas A&M), and Xiaoyu Su (Texas A&M)


Problem-Solving: Advanced Group (12.00 - 1.30 PM)

Instructors: Andrew Yu, Dr. Sherry Gong and Dr. Zhizhang Xie (Texas A&M)

Below is the May 12, 2018 graduation. (Photo taken by JJ)