Intro

Tsubasa Kohyama is a PhD student at the University of Washington, working with Dennis L. Hartmann.
I'll defend my dissertation on Nov 17, after which I will move to the University of Tokyo.

My vision is to understand 
how sea surface temperature will respond to climate change, and
how the Earth's climate will respond to the changing sea surface temperature.

Tsubasa Kohyama  (神山翼) studies the "response of the sea surface temperature (SST) spatial distribution" (ΔSST) to external forcings such as global warming.
Understanding ΔSST is not only challenging as Earth science, but also important for projecting societal damages due to potential changes in abnormal weather events and tropical cyclones.
In particular, I would like to do good, relevant science to answer the following questions:

・How does the atmosphere-ocean-land system determine ΔSST on the whole Earth?
Due to ΔSST, what kind of physical solutions will be chosen by climate modes and atmospheric systems that determine our daily weather?
In a broad sense, how could ΔSST influence the physics, chemistry, and biology on the Earth and the human society?

I am widely interested in topics and methods related to these questions, but as a key for understanding ΔSST, I have an exceptional interest in investigating

The factors that determine global SST in the current climate
The roles of SST in the atmosphere-ocean-land systems and the modern human society

I believe it is good to ask scientific questions testable within my own research career, so I like studying ΔSST under global warming in this sense, too.

Short Bio: Tsubasa Kohyama (神山翼) started his career as a graduate student at the Department of Earth and Planetary Science, the University of Tokyo, under the supervision of Dr. Tomoki Tozuka, and has continued his study under the supervision of Dr. Dennis L. Hartmann at the Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Washington. His research interests include large scale climate variability and change. In particular, he currently investigates sea surface temperature warming patterns of the tropical Pacific in response to global warming (Kohyama et al., 2017; Kohyama and Hartmann, 2017; Kohyama et al, submitted), which is expected to have tremendous influences on global weather and climate (Kohyama and Hartmann, 2016). He was also sub-advised by Dr. John M. Wallace for investigating the lunar gravitational atmospheric tide (Kohyama and Wallace, 2014, 2016). 

I welcome your comments to MyLastName@uw.edu

Photo: Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan