New Guinea Police Force











Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary


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Pictorial History of the
 New Guinea Police Force
1921-1942





In New Guinea shortly before 1914, the German Administration had a police force of a complement of approximately 1.000 New Guinea Locals.The German force was trained by regular Army officers at Rabaul (which was the German Administration HQ) and its function consisted mainly of taking punitive action against tribes which either attacked their administration or resisted their expansion. The dress of the members of the German New Guinea Police Force was a blue serrated lap-lap with a white belt and a white sailor type hat. The New Guinea Police Force was taken over by The Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) from the German Administration in 1914 with the defeat  on the Germans at the Battle of Bita Paka on New Britain known in the German as Neu-Pommern as part Kaiser-Wilhelmsland.

In 1921 the New Guinea Police Force was reorganized upon the commencement of the activities of the Australian Civil Administration. It was not until1930 that a modern Police Force was established in the territory of New Guinea by Colonel J Walstad DSO who became its Superintendent




L P R Johnston, J F Clark, W S Harvey, P J Simnet
   D McDougall,  H. Theckston, W A. Dix, E A. Ash, P G.Nautly, J H. Palmer
   D. Crawley, N B. Blood, W.B. Prior, J Walstab,T Walker, R W Feetum, AM Sinclair (Sandy)


 


Armed Constabulary for New Guinea.
The first ordinance issued this year by the Legislative Council of New Guinea was to pro vide for an armed constabulary, to consist of a commandant, commissioned and non-commissioned officers and constables. Bales and regulations for the government and discipline of the force, &c, may impose penalties not to exceed a fine of £10, or imprisonment not to exceed three months, with or without hardFix this text labour, for ajbreach of any of them. The fol lowing are some of the penalties:—Any member ceasing to be a member of the force who does not deliver up his arms, clothing, accoutre ments, and all property in his possession belonging to the Crown is liable, on conviction, to a fine not exceeding £20; in default of payment, imprisonment not exceeding three months. Any member of the force taking a gratuity, assisting or conniving at the escape or attempted escape of prisoners, deserting his post, or assaulting his superior officer, is liable for every offence to a similar penalty, whioh also applies to those who, without the commandant's consent, leave the force before serving the term of engagement. A commissioned officer, for disobeying his superior officer, is liable to be dismissed the force, and a non-commissioned officer or constable to imprisonment not exceeding one month nor less than two days, with or without hard labour; and for absence from duty without leave to im prisonment not exceeding three months. For escaping from confinement when under arrest, failing to appear at anyplace of parade, leaving such place before relieved, or failing to report any person committed to his charge, a com missioned officer is liable to be dismissed the force, a non-commissioned officer to be reduced to the rank of constable, and to be im prisoned for any period not exceeding two months, and a constable to be imprisoned a similar period, or be dismissed the force. The penalty for malingering on the part of any non-commissioned officer or constable is imprisonment, not exceeding thirty days, with or without hard labour. Commissioned officers are empowered to suspend non-commissioned officers or constables for misconduct, and in eases of petty breaches of discipline the officer in charge of any station or portion of the force, may inflict a penalty not exceeding fourteen days' confinement, or forty-eight hoars' im prisonment. During imprisonment, all pay accruing to a member of the force shall be liable to be forfeited. All fines and penalties may be deducted from pay. Every member of the force shall have the same protection and indemnities in the discharge of duty as any constable or police officer in Queensland, and the Administrator may grant rewards and gratuities to any one whom he may deem deserving of the same. Members of the force are to execute processes and serve summonses and warrants. Persons interfering with the force when in execution of their duty, refusing to assist when called upon, or attempting to induce performance of duty, render themselves liable to a fine of £20, or three months' imprison ment, with or without hard labour. A similar penalty can be imposed on those not enrolled in the force having in possession badges, arms, or uniforms of, or falsely representing them selves to belong to, the force. Two of the sections read as follows:—" In the event of the number of men fixed by resolution of the Legislative Council as that of the force not being obtained by voluntary engagement, every male aboriginal native of the possession who is of sound bodily constitution, and who is, so far as can be ascertained, between the ages of 17 and 40, and unmarried, shall be liable to be enrolled. Due regard shall, in compelling enrolment, be had that not more than • reasonable proportion of men be enrolled from any one district; provided always that the Administrator may from time to time exempt the inhabitants of any specified portion of the possession, or any person engaged in any specified occupation or calling, from the opera tion of this section." "Every person so enrolled under the last section shall be enrolled for not more than three years, nor less than one year, and shall, unless discharged or dismissed, be obliged to serve for the period of enrolment. No person so enrolled to be liable to a second term of service."



 



NEW GUINEA CONSTABULARY

Brisbane, Monday.— Mr D. A. M 'Neill, share broker, has been appointed ..to the command of the armed constabulary now being raised for New Guinea.

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Wednesday 11 September 1889, page 8

 

 NEWGUINEA CONSTABULARY

CANBERRA, June 23.-ApplicaUons were called today for a further batch of Australians from whom the New Guinea Administration can select warrant officers for the New Guinea constabulary. Per sons appointed will receive salaries ranging from £366 to £466 a year. Applications should be made to the Government Secretary at Rabaul not later than September 30.

Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Friday 24 June 1938 p 23 Article




Colonel Walstab and a raiding patrol of native police, Sepik River, Sepik, New Guinea, 1924.


 The curfew bell - this bell was rung each night at 9 PM each night for all native workers to be in there homes  1928

 Prison compound Rabaul  1928  



TNG Native Constabulary c a 1930


 





Lance Corporal in patrol kit with Wife ca 1930

TNG Native Constabulary

 

 

Warrant Officer Sid Riley standing, of the New Guinea Police Force
with Medical assistant and armed constables
Taken in Wau  1928

 
 

New Guinea Native Police on parade under the command
of a European warrant officer around 1929 possible the visit of Lord Stonehaven  24 May 1929, Empire Day


Royal salute for Lord Stonehaven Governor General of Australia 1925-1930
Native Police at Rabaul, taking the salute is Supt John Walstab  24 May 1929,  
 

The 1929 cruse of  the seaplane carrier, HMAS Albatross, to New Guinea, New Ireland and New Britain was unique in that it was the first overseas demonstration of Australian naval air power.  was in fact a vice regal visit to the Pacific outposts by Their Excellencies, the Governor-General, Lord Stonehaven, and Lady Stonehaven. 
Visit of Lord Stonehaven Governor General of Australia 1925-1930
aboard the HMAS Albatross 
24 May 1929, Empire Day

Native Police Guard of Honour which received his excellency the Governor General at Rabaul 





Governor General walking past covered viewing area, Rabaul, New Guinea, 1937 
 New Guinea Police Officer Sandy Sinclair


New Guinea Police on Parade in full Kit
Warrant Officer 2nd class Walker Commanding Parade 
24 May 1929, Empire Day  


Armistice Day at Rabaul November, 11, 1937 Present are The  Administer, Colonel J Walstab, Harold Page, Doctor Hoskins.




Governor General inspecting assembled police, Rabaul, New Guinea, 1937a

Governor General inspecting assembled police, Rabaul, New Guinea, 1937





 

Rabaul New Britain Native Police on Parade June 1927


Warrant Officer 2 William Henry Bird , James Buckingham Stratton, Charles Dawson Bates, George William Waites

 



 24 May 1929, Empire Day
Bugles and drum band Armistice day parade  Rabaul 11/11/1937

 
Armistice day parade  Rabaul 11/11/1937


New Guinea Police Force Training March, along  Mango Ave Turning into Namanula Rd 
 
   
NG Police Training March, Yarra Ave China Town passing the Cosmopolitan Hotel
 

New Guinea Police constable with Prisoners from group who murdered William Naylor and Emile Clarius 1932


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Kukukuku believed at the time to be Baum’s murderers, surrounded by native police after their arrest





Patrol in Snake River New Guinea police and villagers, Snake River, Buangs




 

DIFFICULTIES IN UNKNOWN NEW  GUINEA.

 

 

District Officer Townsend, who arrived in Sydney by the Montero yesterday morning, told an exciting story of his adventures in New Guinea last month, when he discovered the bodies of two gold prospectors and three of their bearers who had been clubbed to death by wild hill tribes in the Morobe district. William Naylor and Emile Clarius were murdered in rugged jungle country on the New Guinea side of the dividing range, which is the boundary between Papua and New Guinea. News of their murder was brought by a native carrier, who staggered, frightened and footsore, in to the village of Otibanda, the last outpost in the district. The native told the patrol officer of the sudden attack on the prospecting party on a path through the jungle. The narrowness of the path and the suddenness of the attack had prevented Naylor and Clarius from using their weapons. Mr. Townsend and his party set out from Salamoa with a detachment of native police for Otibanda, which he left on a three days' journey to the west. The country was among the wildest that the native police had travelled through. Thick scrub covered rugged ridges, and the only chance of travelling rapidly was to follow narrow trails, formed by the frequent passing of natives. Swift, streams between steep cliffs added to the difficulties of the journey. The bodies of Naylor, Clarius, and three of their carriers were found alongside a creek. There were hardly any signs of a conflict, showing that the prospecting party had been taken by surprise. Three native carriers are still unaccounted for, but they probably escaped during the fight. The police party burled the bodies, and searched for the murderers. They had evidently retreated to their fastness in the hills. Mr. Townsend returned, and presented his report, as it was evident that little could be done to bring the natives to justice in less than a couple of months. A well-equipped police party later left for the area, where they will probably remain about three months. It will be handicapped by the fact that the area is practically unknown, and the natives will be able to take advantage of its ruggedness. Mr. Townsend, who is on his way to England on leave, said he did not think that the murders were due to some discreditable act by the prospectors. He said that the natives had probably never seen Europeans before, and that their savagery made visits to them as safe as entering a lion's den.

    The Sydney Morning Herald NSW:Friday 17 February 1933 Page 9 




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Hagen-Sepik Patrol in New Guinea 1938







1938  contingent of New Guinea Police l entered the Oksapmin region.   

March the 9th 1938 a government patrol set out from Mount Hagen in the New Guinea Highlands. It comprised three European patrol officers lead by, Assistant District Officer James Lindsay and a large number of New Guinea native Police and over 200 carriers and support team and a handful of native cooks. This is the first time a venture so large had been assembled in the  Mandated Territory of New Guinea no one had ever   seen the like. It resembled an invasion force, the expense was somewhat of a concern to the Australian Administrator, General Sir Walter McNicoll stationed in Rabaul. The expedition, called the Hagen-Sepik Patrol, the goal was to  explore the geography and the population of the huge stretch of unexplored territory which lay between Mount Hagen and  the Dutch border. It was not totally unknown in the 30s, occasional Papuan government officers, gold prospectors, missionaries and others had left an obscure criss-cross of their struggled passages. But the general nature of the country, the mysteries of the drainage systems of its great rivers and numbers of its populations remained almost blank. The expedition covered some 3000 kilometres, almost all of it on foot. They did not return until 19th June 1939 fifteen months away from civilization.


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March the 9th 1938 a government patrol set out from Mount Hagen in the New Guinea Highlands. It comprised three European patrol officers lead by, Assistant District Officer James Lindsay and a large number of New Guinea native Police and over 200 carriers and support team and a handful of native cooks. This is the first time a venture so large had been assembled in the  Mandated Territory of New Guinea no one had ever   seen the like. It resembled an invasion force, the expense was somewhat of a concern to the Australian Administrator, General Sir Walter McNicoll stationed in Rabaul. The expedition, called the Hagen-Sepik Patrol, the goal was to -------- the geography and the population of that huge stretch of unexplored territory which lay between Mount Hagen and the then Dutch border. It was not totally unknown 1930s, occasional Papuan government officers, gold prospectors, missionaries and others had left an obscure criss-cross of their struggled passages. But the general nature of the country, the mysteries of the drainage systems of its great


General Walter McNicoll reviews New Guinea Police in Rabaul New Guinea

 

A Sargent of the New

Guinea Native Constabulary

Ca 1932


New Guinea Police Force TNG Constabulary ca 1933

A squad on patrol With medical aid 

 





 



 

New Guinea police force preparing for parade

 

Armistice day parade  Rabaul 11/11/1937

 
 

 

WO2 Edwin Ayris leading parade for Lord Stonehaven Governor General of Australia 
 Empire day 24 May 1929,

 

Warrant Officer Arthur Glyuas with squad  Madang 1937



New Guinea Police Force  on parade, Rabaul, New Britain  c 1921.


 

WO Sid Reilly Rabaul August 1927

 

WO Bob Worman Joined NGPF 1930
went to coronation in 1937 died in Sydney enroute to Rabaul 1927

Wo2 Edwin Birkley Ayres joined
 NGPF 1929 retired in 1936






An execution of two Local Policeman 3391 Nerter and his brother Nadriven, at Kavieng, New Ireland New Guinea, on 3 February 1915. The execution was ordered by the District Officer, Captain Richard Thorold, for the murder of the 'malay' Justus Otto Milleyn. The execution was carried out by two squads of Police Boys. The photograph, was taken by an unidentified German and was sent as a postcard by Kavieng Police Master Edmund Joseph (Ned) Dwyer to his sister Kate. Dwyer is standing to the left of the firing line, carrying a stick.



 

 


 




Early detachments of NGPF
first & second frames  frame early 20s   properly still under the  command of the A&NEF (1914-1921)
the detachments are wearing the old style uniform.
In the third frame most are wearing the peaked cap of the later NGPR, the one second from the right is still wearing the old navy type cap
he carrying a 303 calibre rifle yet the chap to his left is carrying a Martini this possibly is late 20s early 30, snake river Morobe district


 

 
 

 
 

 

 

 


Rabaul  New Guinea 1938  General Walter McNichol   
reviewing and taking salute at march past of the New Guinea police force.
 
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