Brief History until Rajputs - Part 3

NB: This article can be found after the following introductory passages.


Before you read this article, please note that, from 1996, I (Pari, the author of this article) had begun to see numerous visions. I was trying to understand what was happening to me. As I was trying to understand this, I began writing all the articles which can be found in this website. Each article is a continuation of the earlier one. So what I had explained in earlier articles were not explained in subsequent articles. This had also allowed me to keep developing what I have to explain. After I had written numerous articles, people were asking me as to which articles they had to read in order to understand something or the other. Thus, in 2015, I began to write books. All the knowledge which a person needs, so as to understand the contents of a book, are given in the book. Thus, a person could understand the contents of a book without having to revert to other articles or books. However, a better understanding could be had through reading the other books. I had also begun writing my first book “Holographic Universe : An Introduction” because I began to have a good understanding on the structure of the Holographic Universe through experiences, guidance from God, research, etc. 

It should be remembered that my articles were written while I was trying to understand what was happening to me. So, the emphasis in the articles may have been on my own roles (due to the afterlife of my past births). In my books, I concentrate on just explaining knowledge and not really on giving an explanation on my own role. 

It should be noted that since there are so many articles, I find it very difficult to update the articles. So there may be information in them which has not been updated. I try my best to keep my eBooks updated. 

Anyway, to have a better understand of what has been said in this article, read all my earlier articles. Begin by reading the first article which is numbered as No.1 at my List of Articles. Then, re-read this article to have a better understanding. It should be noted that all my articles were written based on time being cyclic. Click here to understand the basics of the Cycle of Time.



(posted on 14-10-2013)

Written by Brahma Kumari Pari, LL.B (Hons)(Lon), LL.M, PhD.

NB: there is a brief explanation on the cycle, at the end of this article, for those who are not familiar with the Cycle of Time. For convenience, I am referring to those who walked out of the divine world, at the end of the Silver Age, as the Anunnaki since they have been referred to as the Anunnaki in the Sumerian myths. The Sumerian mythological names/roles like Enlil, Enki, Ningishzidda, Marduk, Anunna etc were only some of the roles which they were using.These people/souls had used many roles during the Mid-Confluence (Confluence between the Silver and Copper Ages). Their actual names were considered as being insignificant. I have begun an explanation on this at: Egyptian Ren & Mythical Names – Part 1 (Name of the Soul) and at Egyptian Ren & Mythical Names : Part 2 – Ancient Naming System. 

In "Links to Other sites & Introduction", I have begun an introduction as to which souls were playing the roles of the Anunnaki, Anunna rulers, Enlil, Marduk, Aryans, Anaryans, mapmakers etc.


Title: Brief history from the Mid-Confluence until the removal of Buddhism by the Agnivanshi Rajput clans (the descendants of the gods/Aryans) - Part 3 (Extermination of the Kshatriyas by Parasurama)

 

(includes a brief discussion on the creation of the Solar, Lunar, Naga and Agnivanshi warriors; Indras and lesser gods taking care of the mortal civilizations of all the Manus; King Kartavirya; divine cow of Jamadagni; Jamadagni; significance of 7x3=21; Jamadagni’s wife)

 

Contents: After the flood, in the Mid-Confluence, the Solar warrior clan was established for protecting the mortal civilization which Manu had established. With time, since the solar warriors were not doing a good job in taking care of the people, the Lunar Kshatriya clan was established for protecting the mortals. Thus, there were two Kshatriya dynasties to protect the mortals.

The Naga role began, at the beginning of the Mid-Confluence, for what needs to be done for the next new creation. With time, since there were many Nagas, they began to have their own Naga kingdoms. Thus, the Nagas also began to have their Kshatriyas to protect their kingdoms and for the Naga service that will, finally, continue at the end of the cycle (now). Since the role of the gods was to take care of the mortals, even the Nagas were used to take care of the mortals and the earth. Thus, when Parasuram was exterminating the warriors, there were 3 Kshatriya clans (the Solar, Lunar and Naga warriors) that were being exterminated for bad behavior.

In a Hindu myth, King Kartavirya and his army visited Jamadagni (Parasuram’s father) at his ashram. Jamadagni could feed the huge group because he had a divine cow which was able to grant wishes. King Kartavirya wanted Jamadagni’s divine cow. The rishi refused to give it to him. So, in one version of this myth, Kartavirya ordered his army to capture the cow by force. Jamadagni looked at the cow and the cow created an army to fight back. Kartavirya’s army was defeated in the battle. This happened 21 times. In each of these 21 battles, the army created by the cow was victorious. Thus, Kartavirya killed Jamadagni; but he could not find the cow after that, since it vanished and went back to heaven. Then, Sage Bhrigu brought Jamadagni back to life. After this, Parasuram killed Kartavirya because of what had happened. Then, the sons of Kartavirya killed Jamadagni. Parasuram’s mother had called out to Parasuram, 21 times, to protect his father. Despite this, Jamadagni got killed. So Parasuram killed all the Kshatriyas on earth “Thrice times seven” (3 x 7 = 21).

In another version, Kartavirya stole the sacred cow after Jamadagni had refused to give it to him. Later, Parashurama killed King Kartavirya and returned the cow to his father. Then, the sons of the Kartavirya killed Parasuram’s father, in revenge. Thus, Parasuram killed them and then killed all the other Kshatriyas “Thrice times seven.

The 2 versions, given above, reflect 2 kinds of situations that had taken place, during the mid-Confluence. All the versions, of this myth, reflect how the Kshatriyas had got influenced by the vices. All the versions reflect how the Kshatriyas were trying to grab the benefits/authority that had been given to the Brahmins; and how those playing the role of Parasurama were trying to make sure that the Brahmins continue enjoying the benefits/authority which they were given.

The King of Lemuria (Enki, in the Sumerian myths) was the one who was usually playing the role of Parasurama. The King of Bharath (Enlil, in the Sumerian myths) was usually playing the role of Rama. However, when Enki and Enlil took the decision to exterminate the Kshatriyas because the Kshatriyas were behaving badly, both (Enlil and Enki) were playing the role of Parasuram. Parasuram and Rama were just roles. This is similar to how the members of the Brahma Kumaris use the role of Brahma since we are involved with world transformation, we use the role of Ganga when we give spiritual knowledge to others, we use the role of Parvati when we carry out Godly service on earth, etc.

The Anunna rulers had remained in India, when the Anunnaki were sent to the Middle East. Thus, the representatives of the Anunna were in India. The Anunna and their representatives were portrayed as Jamadagni who was the father of Parasuram. Though the Anunna were rulers, it was the Anunnaki who were actually getting things done on earth. Thus, it was as if the Anunnaki were playing the role of Parasuram (a Kshatriya-like Brahmin) while the Anunna and their representatives were like that of Sage Jamadagni. Jamadagni represents the Brahmins (which includes the Anunna rulers and their sage-representatives on earth). The Anunna rulers were the parents of the Anunnaki. Thus, Jamadagni was portrayed as the father of Parasuram.

In the myth, Jamadagni also represents the instruments of God. God is the father of all souls. God (as Anu in the Sumerian myths) was also the Father of the Anunnaki. God was portrayed as their father because they were involved with His service on earth. This was also a reason why Jamadagni was portrayed as the father of Parasuram.

Jamadagni also portrays ‘God’s service on earth’. The original qualities of the soul are the virtues and not the vices. At the end of the cycle, God transforms us back to the original virtuous state. From the Mid-Confluence, the Anunna and Anunnaki (on God’s behalf) were using the Brahmins/sages to make sure that the people remained virtuous. However, the Kshatriyas were being influenced by the vices. Thus, it was as if they were killing off God’s service on earth. Further, what the Anunnaki, Anunna and their sage-representatives were doing, would also get connected to God’s service that takes place at the end (for transforming the world into a divine world). However, since the Kshatriyas began to get influenced by the vices, it was as if they were killing off this ‘service of God’ which was being done by the Anunna, Anunnaki and their sage-representatives during the Mid-Confluence. In the myth, killing Jamadagni was like killing everything that was being done by ‘God and his instruments’ on earth.

The Anunna rulers and their children (the Anunnaki) were having control over everything on earth. They were the instruments of God on earth. It was as if God and the World Drama were giving them whatever they needed for Godly service on earth. So it was as if they were given a divine cow which gives them whatever they ask for. These Anunna and Anunnaki were using others, on earth, to carry out the Godly service. The Anunna and Anunnaki were giving their representatives, on earth, whatever they needed for the Godly service which was being done. So it was as if the Anunna and the Anunnaki had given a divine cow to their sage-representatives, which can give these sage-representatives whatever they ask for. This is a reason why, in the Hindu myths, the divine cow is associated to the Brahmins/sages. The ‘divine cow’ symbolically represents their entire material and spiritual wealth. Though associated to wealth, the divine cow is a ‘sacred’ animal. In the myth, the divine cow was also portrayed as a protector of the Brahmins (through the divine cow providing the armies to fight the Kshatriyas) because the gods were helping the sages/Brahmins. 

In my articles (e.g  The Sumerian King List and the Rule by god Indra on Rotation and Manu (on Rotation), Manvantara, Ayodhya and the Scythians), I have begun explaining how the Anunnaki were originally playing the role of Indra, before the flood. After the flood, the Anunnaki were playing the roles of the higher gods like that of Brahma, Vishnu and Shanker; and others were appointed to play the role of Indra and the other lesser gods. These Indras and lesser gods were taking care of Manu’s mortal civilization. In my other articles, I have begun explaining how there were many Manus all over the world. These Manus were creating civilizations in all the 7 continents and worlds. The Indras and lesser gods were taking care of all these civilizations and they were providing them with whatever they needed. They were playing the role of the ‘divine cow’ which provides whatever the owner asks for. Thus, the sages, who had these cows, were able to request for anything and they will be provided whatever they ask for. There was no need to revert to the 8 Anunnaki rulers for permission to give what these sages were asking for. This was happening based on the custom that had existed in the first half cycle. In the first half cycle, the people could get whatever they asked for. This custom was continued during the Mid-Confluence. This was also a reason why Jamadagni was portrayed as getting food through the divine cow so as to feed Kartavirya and his army. The right to request was given to some Brahmins who were not influenced by the vices (since they were involved with religion and meditation). However, the Kshatriyas wanted to be the ones who enjoy this right, which the Brahmins were having.

The rishi refusing to give the cow to Kartavirya represented that the sages/brahmins were not instructing the gods to satisfy the body-conscious desires of the Kshatriyas; and neither were the gods doing anything to satisfy the body-conscious desires of the Kshatriyas. When the Kashatriyas were not being given the rights which the Sages had, when they requested for it, the Kshatriyas were trying to grab this right away from the Brahmins. Thus, Kartavirya was portrayed as trying to take over the cow by force. Kartavirya ordering his army to capture the cow by force also represented that the Kings began to misuse their armies for personal gain. However, the Brahmins were having help from the gods who were supposed to make sure that the mortals are taken care off, etc. Thus, when the gods got to know of what the Kshatriyas were doing, the gods had immediately sent help to keep the situation under control. This was also a reason why, in the Hindu myths, the gods were portrayed as fighting with the demons who were trying to conquer the world of mortals and the world of the gods. This was also why in the above first version, when Kartavirya ordered his army to capture the cow by force, Jamadagni looked at the cow and the cow created an army to fight back. The army, that was created by the cow, represented those who were involved with God’s service; and so they were protecting God’s service. Since those involved with God’s service could get whatever they needed, they were victorious in all the 21 battles.

In the first version of the above myth, the 21 battles (fought between Kartavirya’s army and the army created by the cow) represented the battles that were fought by the 3 kinds of warriors, of the 7 continents, against those who were sent by the gods to fight them. The cow vanishing and going back to heaven, after Jamadagni was killed, represented how the warriors were still not able to get the rights of the Brahmins from the gods (who were supposed to be in heaven). Sage Bhrigu bringing Jamadagni back to life represented that the Anunnaki and Anunna rulers re-established the custom where sages have all rights. Then, the Anunnaki (Enlil and Enki) took actions against those who were represented as Kartavirya. This was represented through how Parasuram killed Kartavirya. However, the Kshatriyas were behaving badly. It was as if it was not possible to keep control over their actions in all 7 continents/worlds. This was portrayed through the sons of Kartavirya killing Jamadagni.

Kartavirya and his sons killing Jamadagni represented that the Kshatriyas began killing the role which the Brahmins were using and/or they were not flowing along with the Brahmins. Through this the role of the Brahmin was being killed off. The Kshatriyas may have also started killing Brahmins in an attempt to take over the rights which the Brahmins enjoyed.

Parasuram’s mother calling out to Parasuram, 21 times, to protect his father represented how the deity souls within the people (in all the 7 continents) were calling out to God and the Anunnaki for help against what the 3 warrior clans were doing. In the myths, the deity souls within the people have sometimes been portrayed as the ‘wives’. For example, Sita (the wife of Rama) represented the deity souls within the people who were saved by God/Rama (at the end of the cycle). Sita also represented the deity souls who were within the people of the King of Bharath (during the Mid-Confluence). Tara (the wife of Vali) represented the deity souls within the people who were under the authority of Enki, Marduk, the Enkites, their representatives and/or the kings in their city-states. Ruma (the wife of Sugriva) represented the deity souls within the people who were under the authority of Enlil, Ninurta, the Enlilites, their representatives and/or the kings in their city-states. Similarly, the deity souls within the people, who were flowing along with the Godly service done through those portrayed as Jamadagni, were portrayed as the wife of Jamadagni.

Since the Kshatriyas were behaving badly, Parasuram killed all the Kshatriyas on earth “Thrice times seven” (3 x 7 = 21). Parasuram killing the Kshatriyas 21 times represents how Parasuram was exterminating the 3 warrior clans in all 7 continents/worlds. The role of Parasuram was used to bring back the lands under the control of the ‘Anunnaki and the Anunna rulers’.

‘Exterminating the Kshatriyas’  meant that the people who were the Kshatriyas were no longer the Kshatriyas. It was the ‘warrior’ role that was being exterminated. However, at the same time, those who were behaving badly were also being killed. During the Aryan-Anaryan war, people had started killing each other. So killing was ‘nothing new’. Thus, the rulers had started using ‘killing’ as a punishment so that one can be punished in the same way that one had treated another. Thus, if one killed someone, one will get killed in return. This law/rule/custom is based on the Law of Karma.

In the second version, Parashurama killing King Kartavirya and returning the cow to his father represented the situation where some of the Kshatriyas were victorious in taking over the rights which the Brahmins were having. However, Parasuram returned those rights to the sages. Then, the sons of Kartavirya killing Parasuram’s father represented how the Kshatriyas were trying to take back the rights by force. However, these Kshatriyas were killed by Parasuram. Then, all the 3 warrior clans were exterminated in all 7 continents/worlds, through the role of Parasuram.

In the myth, King Kartavirya was the incarnation of Vishnu’s celestial weapon (the Chakra which was in the hand of Vishnu). A weapon was portrayed as ‘taking a human birth’ so as to portray that the Kshatriyas had begun using powerful weapons which were, originally, only in the hands of the gods. The advanced sciences, and the powerful weapons that were created through using the advanced sciences, were originally only in the hands of the gods. But the powerful weapons were given to the Kshatriyas since they were playing the role of the protectors. However, it was being misused and people were being killed. Thus, Enlil and Enki had to take actions against them through the role of Parasuram.

After Parasuram had exterminated all the Kshatriyas in all the 7 continents, Parasuram had handed over the earth to Kashyapa. Kashyapa allowed the Kashtriyas to play a role again. Thus, the Solar and Lunar warriors were re-established and the third Agnivanshi Kshatriya clan was established by Sage Vashistha. This history was related in the creative myths that had been left behind. The myths are a combination of history and story. The story in the myth has symbolic representations.

Om Shanti 

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To have a better understand of what has been said in this article, read all my articles. Begin by reading the first article which is numbered as No.1 at: Pari's List of articles. Then, re-read this article to have a better understanding.

The names and links for articles by Pari can be found at:
Global Brahma Kumaris - Pari's articles and videos  


NB: All my articles are based on time moving in a cyclic manner, in the order as follows:

1. the divine world in the first half cycle: involving the Golden Age (Satyug) and then the Silver Age (Tetrayug). 

2. the Confluence between the Silver and Copper Ages: where the world transforms back into the ordinary state (after a vice was entertained). For convenience, I refer to this Confluence as the Mid-Confluence.

3. the ordinary world of the second half cycle: involving the Copper  Age (Dwapuryug) and then the Iron Age (Kaliyug).

4. the Confluence Age (at the end, now): through which the world is transformed back into the divine Golden Aged world.

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