Quarter 1 Reading List:

EMPATHY

To Kill A Mockingbird

By Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird: The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town, and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill a Mockingbird became both an instant best-seller and a critical success when published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award winning movie.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill a Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior - to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. This regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book a love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

The Absolutely True Diary of a PArt-Time Indian

By Sherman Alexie

The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian: Junior is a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian reservation. Born with a variety of medical problems, he is picked on by everyone but his best friend. Determined to receive a good education, Junior leaves the rez to attend an all-white school in the neighboring farm town where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Despite being condemned as a traitor to his people and enduring great tragedies, Junior attacks life with wit and humor and discovers a strength inside of himself that he never knew existed.

Inspired by his own experiences growing up, award-winning author, Sherman Alexie, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one unlucky boy trying to rise above the life everyone expects him to live.

Enrique's Journey

By Sonia Nazario

Enrique's Journey: Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this astonishing story puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States. Now a beloved classic, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.

Enrique's Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops. But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: "This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one."