Sadhu's encounter with Kailash Maharishi 

Himalayas mountains

 

A North Indian newspaper had published the following:

 

Our world less, selfless and godly brother Sundar Singh has discovered the Christian hermit, the Maharishi at Kailash, who has for years been on the snowy Himalayas praying and interceding for the world…You have revealed to the world the secret of one of the members of our mission the Maharishi at Kailash.

 

On the summit of one of the mountains of the Kailash Range was a deserted Buddhist temple, and then rarely visited by man.  A few miles from this temple dwelt the great saint known as the Majority of Kailash, in a cave some 13,000 feet above the sea level.  All this region is the Olympus of India, the seat of Hindu holy myths, and it is associated in Hindu sacred books with the names of great and devout souls of all times.  In one cave, the Sadhu found the skeleton of some nameless holy man who had died while meditating there.

 

In the summer of 1912, he traveled through these regions alone and on foot, often refreshed by the beautiful scene trough, which he passed, but more often fatigued to the last degree in his difficult and fruitless search for the holy men he hoped to meet there.  He would never forget the day when, struck with snow-blindness and almost wearied to death, he staggered drearily on over snowy and stony crags, not knowing whither, he went.  Suddenly he lost his balance and fell.  Recovering from the fall, he awoke to one of the greatest experiences of his life, for he opened his eyes to find himself lying outside a huge cave, in the shelter of which sat the Maharishi of Kailash in deep meditation.

 

The sight that met his eyes was so appalling that Sundar closed them and almost fainted.  Little by little, he ventured to inspect the object before him, and then discovered that he was looking at a living human being, but so old and clothed with long hair as to appear at first glance like an animal.  Sundar realized that thus, unexpectedly he had succeeded in his search after a holy man, and as soon as he could command his voice, he spoke to the aged saint.  Recalled from his meditation, the saint opened his eyes and, casting a piercing glance upon the Sadhu, amazed him by saying, ‘Let us kneel and pray.’  Then followed a most earnest Christian prayer ending in the name of Jesus.  This over, the Maharishi unrolled a ponderous copy of the Gospels in Greek and read some verses from the fifth chapter of Matthew.

 

Sunder heard from his own lips the account of his wonderful life.  He claimed to be of very great age.  The roll from which he had read, he explained, had come down to him from Francis Xavier, and the Sadhu noticed that it was all written in Greek uncials, and may therefore prove to be of value to scholars should it come into their possession.  The saint said he was born in Alexandria of a Mohammedan family, and was brought up to be a zealous follower of the Prophet.  At the age of thirty, he renounced the world and entered a monastery in order to give himself up entirely to religion.  However, the more he read the Qur’an and prayed, the unhappier he became.  During these days of spiritual distress, he heard of a Christian saint who had gone over from India to preach in Alexandria, and from him he heard words of life that filled his hopeless soul with joy.  He now left the monastery to accompany his teacher in his missionary journeys.  After some time spent thus, permission was given him to go on his own account to preach the gospel wherever God sent him.   The saint then started out on an evangelistic campaign that lasted a very long time.

 

The Sadhu had long conversations with him about holy things, and heard many strange things from his lips.  His astonishing visions as related to the Sadhu would, if written down, read like another Book of Revelation, so strange and incomprehensible are they, and the Sadhu himself warns readers and hearers of these visions that common interpretations can never disclose the meaning, since the Saint had to clothe his ideals in language that cannot be taken literally.  The Sadhu had visited the Maharishi three times.