Instructors

SPRING 2012

SPRING 2012 - BOT105A 
HONORS: INTRODUCTORY ETHNOBOTANY - Mānoa

This schedule is organized by week. Click on the schedule topics in the boxes below to get to the video, certain additional readings, worksheets, handouts, and other materials which should be reviewed for each class and laboratory, and for the examinations.  

Watch the lecture videos, do the readings, and print the handouts BEFORE you come to class.  

Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the interaction and interrelationships of plants and people.  This includes a wide range of topics taken from an even wider range of disciplines, and considers the many different type of interactions between plants and human cultures.  Although examples from around the world are used, a special emphasis is placed on the cultural uses of plants in Hawai‘i and the Pacific.

This course provides for General Education, Foundations Requirement credit (for graduation) under the Global and Multicultural Perspectives, Group C (FGC).


See the following course web pages:

  • Learning Outcomes
  • Teaching Modes
(See webpage link above).
  • Abbott, Isabella.  1992.  La‘au Hawai‘i, traditional Hawaiian uses of plants.  Honolulu, Bishop Museum Press. (A)
  • Balick, Michael J. & Paul Alan Cox.  1996.  Plants, People, and Culture, the science of ethnobotany.  Austin, American Botanical Council (2005 reprint ed.).  (B&C)

Field Trips: 
(arranged by student), with worksheet(s) to be completed.  See webpage, Written Assignments).

(See webpage link above).
  • Family interactions with plants.
  • Short library research on source information about “minor” [plants providing supplementary uses in a culture(s)] plants.

(See webpage link above).
Course Schedule - Spring 2012
Monday & Wednesday, 10:30-11:20 a.m.   St. John 402

Week Week's Discussion Topics & Video Links
Due Dates of Works Sheets & Other Written Assignments
 Reading Assignments & LinksClass Subjects & HandoutsOptional Videos & Readings
(additional subject information; this material will not be included in the examinations):
1

Jan. 9, 11 
Introduction to Ethnobotany

A multi-purpose plant (niu, Cocos nucifera)

1. Opening Oli

2. Introduction
  • Read over the syllabus handed out the first day of class and familiarize yourself with: 
  • Balick & Cox 1996:
    • 1-23 (People & Plants); 
    • 71, 110 (coconut); 
    • 190-195 (palms: multi-purpose plants).
  • Abbott 1992  (coconut):
    • 33-35 (food & drink), 
    • 57-58 (kapa scenting), 
    • 61 (cordage), 
    • 69-70 (thatching), 
    • 76 (fans), 
    • 93 (fire), 
    • 95-96 (dishes and utensils), 
    • 103 (strainer), 
    • 108 (kahili component), 
    • 119-122 (musical instruments).
Monday, Jan. 9:
  • Introduction to Ethnobotany.
  • Introduction of Botany 105.
  • Introduction of faculty and students.
Wednesday, Jan. 11:   
Introduction to plant morphology and 
anatomy of a multi-purpose plant (niu, Cocos nucifera).
 
Jan. 16

HOLIDAY - Martin Luther King Day Review Course syllabus and web pages.  
2

Jan. 18
The Beginnings of Plants & People

1. Guns, Germs & Steel 
2. Transported Landscapes 
  • Balick & Cox 1996:63-97 (food plants).
  • Continuation of the significance of coconut.
  • Introduction to campus plants (St. John Plant Science Laboratory Building courtyard).
  • Additional assignment:  find other campus plants
1. Origins of Plant Uses  
3

Jan. 23, 25
Minor Food Plants,
Aquatic Food Plants

  • Abbott 1992:
    • 33-48 (land food plants), 
    • 45-48 (aquatic food plants),  
    • 93-96 (cooking and utensils), 
    • 115-116 (limu kala).
  • Chock 1968 pages 221-238 (Hawaiian wild food & beverage plants).
Monday, Jan. 23:
Discussion of supplementary food plants.

Wednesday, Jan. 25:   
Limu (basic identificatiion, types, ecology)
 
4

Jan. 30, Feb. l
Major Crops

  • Abbott 1992:
    • 23-32 (Hawaiian staple crops);  
    • 87-96 (food transportation, preparation, and service), 
    • 24 (fig. 20, kalo illustration); 
  • Balick & Cox 1996:63-97 (food plants). 
Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 10:30 a.m., Ka Papa Lo‘i o Kānewai 2645 Dole Street (for map and directions)
Hiapo Cashman (Director) and David Strauch (TA) at the lo'i.

5

Feb. 6, 8
Library Research,
Ethics, and Interviews
1. Ethics 

Spices

Research topic for your written assignment paper due on Feb. 8, 2012
Monday, Feb. 6 at 10:30 a.m., Hamilton Library Classroom 156 (first floor of library, behind the elevators; mauka side).
Library orientation: Eileen Herring, (Science & Technology Reference Librarian and Department Head) and David Strauch (TA).

Wednesday, Feb. 8:
ISE Code of Ethics  (English text, optional reading)
6

Feb. 13, 15

The Pacific, the Largest Earth Feature

1. Evolution of Pacific Cultures 
2. Lapita Toolkits 

  • Abbott 1992: 
    • 1-6 (first Hawaiians and their plants), 
    • 7-14 (evolving relationship to land and sea), 
    • 15-22 (religious dimensions of Hawaiian agriculture). 
  • Balick & Cox 1996 
    • 98-113 (plants as the basis for material culture), 
    • 141-143 (plants and human cosmologies). 

Monday, Feb. 13:
Wednesday, Feb. 15:
  • Student presentations of spice information.
1. Crops in Pacific Island Cultures
2. Canoe Plants: Five Pacific Trees
3. Origins of Plant Uses  (repeat of optional video in week 2 above)
Feb. 20 HOLIDAY - Presidents' Day   
7

Feb/ 22
Kava and Ceremonial Beverages

1. 'awa and Cultural Conservation
  • Abbott 1992:42-43 ('awa) and 114-115 ('awa in ceremonies).
  • Balick & Cox 1996:160-164 (kava).
We will be drinking 'awa in class today, so please read about it before coming to class, so you will be able to make an informed decision about whether or not to drink it.
 
 
8

Feb. 27

Other Beverages

Foster Garden Worksheet due Feb. 27

1. Stimulating Beverages 

2. Alcoholic Beverages 


  • Abbot 1992:41-42, 144 ('okolehao).

  • Continuation of worksheet above (completion of  table at the bottom of page 2).

Feb. 27:  Nutrition    We will be eating different rice varieties in class today. 

  • Bring a "cultural food" to share. 
  • Write a short description of what you are bringing - its compositions (ingredients), its ethnobiological signifcance or background.
 
Feb. 29MID-TERM EXAMINATION        All readings, discussions & videos (but not the "optional videos" in the extreme right column)  Videos and Readings in this column will not be included in the examination.
9

Mar. 5, 7
Psychoactive Plants
  • Balick & Cox 1996:145-177 (entering the other world).
  • Examples of some psychoactive plants.

March 7: 

  • Student oral assigned presentations about psychoactive plants.  Turn in written (hard copy) and electronic copies..
Shultes, Richard Evans & Albert Hofmann.  1979. Plants of the Gods: origins of hallucogenic use.  McGraw-Hill, New York (QK 99 A1 S39).
10

Mar. 12, 14
Medicinal Plants

1. Illness and Medicine in Cultural Settings 
2. Herbal Remedies 


  • Balick & Cox 1996:24-52 (plants that heal).
Herbs, Medicine
March 12:  Discuss handout questions on medicinal plants.

March 14:  Student presentations of psychoactive plants.

 
11

Mar. 19, 21
More Medicinal Plants 

1. Polynesian Herbal Medicine           
2. Chinese Traditional Medicine 


  • Abbott 1992:97-103 (medicines and healing). 
  • Balick & Cox 1996 pages 53-61 (continuation of plants that heal).
March 19: Some Hawaiian medicinal plants (power point lecture).

March 21Medicine Segue (role playing).  Discuss handout questions. 
1. Rotuman Health Care                    
2. Hawaiian Health Care                    
3. Medicinal Plants Dolpo, Nepal
March 
26-30
Spring Recess

March 26 - Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalaniana'ole Pi'ikoi Day 
12

April 2, 4
Maintaining the Beat: Tapa, paper, cloth and cordage
Visiting  a  Community Resource Worksheet Due  April 4

  • Abbott 1992:
    • 49-63 (clothing and the making of kapa), 
    • 117-122 (hula and music).
  • Balick & Cox 1996: 
    • 91-95 (fiber), 
    • 11-115 (cordage and containers),
    • 125-128 (textiles).
Maintaining the beat (musical instruments, types of "cloth")
April 2: Hawaiian musical implements 
(power point lecture) 
    Mathematics and Music

April 4: different types of "cloth".

Kuo Hina E Hiapo
2. Recollection of a Family Tradition  

13

April 9, 11

 Folk Taxonomy

Bishop Museum Worksheet Due 
April 11
1. Why are Plants Useful to Us?
2. What Makes Plants Waterproof?
3. Taxonomy 


  • Abbott 1992:
    • 71-77 (household furnishings), 
    • 78-86 (canoes and fishing tools), 
    • 105-112 (warfare and chiefly regalia), 
    • 123-130 (personal adornment and leisure).
  • Balick & Cox 1996  (repeated readings): 
    • 7-14 (people and plants), 
    • 99-143 (material culture).
April 9: Useful Hawaiian wood sources  (power point lecture).

April 11:  Exercise on folk taxonomy, "naming" and describing 32 plants and making a dichotomous key (to be completed by April 16.
Botany

 
14

April 16, 18
Houses

  • Abbott 1992:
    • 64-70 (houses and other buildings),.
    • 71-77 (household furnishings).
April 16: Housing and examples of materials.
April 18: Sustainable Agriculture  Home gardens exercise
Horticulture
1. Shelter and Cultural Identification with Nature 
2. Architecture & Historic Buildings
15

April 23, 25
Saving Culture and the Environment

Written Interview Assignment due
by April 25, 12 noon; must be sent as an MS Word or WordPerfect document attachment (NO pdf!) to e-mail address
and printed hard copy

1. Ethnoecology and Conservation
2. Carving a Future: 10 lessons for sustainable woodcarving  


  • Abbott 1992:
    • 7-14 (repeated reading; evolving relationship to land and crops),
    • 15-22  (repeated reading; religious dimensions),
    • 131-136 (changes in society and plant use after 1820).
  • Balick & Cox 1996:
    • 128-132 (vanishing art),
    • 179-208 (biological conservation and ethnobotany).
April 23: Student presentations on home gardens, invasive plants, and endangered species.
Ecology

April 25: Continuation of student presentations.
Discussion of conservation and its issues.

1. Ethnobotany and Conservation in Africa 
2. Ethnobotany and Conservation in Micronesia
16

April 30,
May 2



Faith and Science
1. Buddhism and Plants 
2. Christianity and Plants 


  • Abbott 1992: 
    • 15-22  (repeated reading; religious dimensions),
    • 113-116 (religious images and ceremonies).
April 30: Student presentations on religious plants.
Ku`u Pua i Paoakalani

May 2: Continuation of student presentations.  Video on Buddhism and Plants, since EB videos "are down."
 

Friday, May 11

FINAL EXAMINATION 

9:45-11:45 a.m.

All readings, discussions and videos since the mid-term exam 
 

(May 2, 2012; June 25, 2012)

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