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FAQ

            Who are we?

·         We welcome full-time and part-time faculty to our growing chapter. At present, we are most actively involved in advocating for equity, shared governance and academic freedom for 600+  FRCC adjunct faculty members at the multiple campuses of Front Range Community College. FRCC is the largest of the 14 colleges within the Colorado Community College System (CCCS). The CCCS  comprises more than 33 campuses and satellite centers in all corners of the state, employing  4,000 adjunct faculty who teach 85% of all the courses the CCCS offers to 150,000+ students (enrollments vary slightly year to year and by campus). The CCCS is the largest employer of adjunct faculty in the state, and its adjunct faculty represent 70% of the total faculty and half of all CCCS employees. The adjunct faculty are among the most talented, devoted, and proven teachers in Colorado, many teaching university transfer courses in one of the most challenging settings in higher education: the local, open-enrollment, community college.

·         FRCC adjunct faculty are highly skilled, highly educated professionals who have been invisible for more than 45 years of the state’s community college history. Their names are rarely listed in course schedules, faculty directories, or the system-wide Faculty Excellence report.  Their contributions receive only passing mention in reports, vision statements, salary surveys, strategic plans and meeting agendas.

·         Their work supports a vast and growing bureaucracy of fully benefited administrators while adjunct faculty earn below-poverty-level wages. Many adjuncts qualify for food stamps and food-bank use, health care through the Colorado Indigent Care Program, and utility subsidies to make ends meet. The system employs the minimum number of full-time faculty (fewer than 20%) for accreditation purposes.

·         The FRCC AAUP Chapter recognizes the adjunct working situation is also the student learning environment.  Year after year, high-quality, experienced teachers leave community colleges to work elsewhere, and this disregard for high-quality teaching reflects a lack of concern for students. We believe that once public awareness is raised on this issue, significant change will ensue.
 

            What do we do?

·         We have been asked by community college leadership to work with legislators to create the needed change. Accordingly, we meet regularly with legislators and with decision-makers in the state's higher education community through the Colorado Conference of AAUP.  Building public awareness of the adjunct issue is, of course, integral to this work. We periodically release updates to the press and to legislative committees, hold public events and share information across social media. We sponsor weekly visits to food banks and work with the Colorado Department of Health and Public Environment to secure flu shot vouchers for adjunct faculty.

·         In addition, we network nationally through the Washington, D.C. office of the American Association of University Professors, the Chicago Coalition for Academic Labor and national Campus Equity Week.
         We are neither supported nor endorsed by the Colorado Community College System or any of its 14 campuses. Our funding comes from community members.
 
What do we need?
 
·         We advocate at the local, state and national level for income and benefit parity, shared

governance and academic freedom. It is our belief that, as faculty majority, we earn these

through our long-standing contributions to the success of our college. However,  we have

yet to be recognized and compensated for them.
 
We need YOU to become involved.  Join us. Contact  frccaaupchapter@gmail.com
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