Bond Progress Reports

Updates on the bond issue projects at Bartlesville Public SchoolsFacebook YouTube  

Recent Progress Reports

  • Late May 2020 Bond Projects Update Projects and programs funded by the 2019 bond issue continue to progress despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Some students will have virtual learning experiences this summer made possible by technology ...
    Posted May 30, 2020, 11:21 AM by Granger Meador
  • April 2020 Bond Projects Update Funding from the 2016 bond issue made it possible for the district to shift to online learning for middle school and high school students for the remainder of the 2019 ...
    Posted Apr 12, 2020, 4:14 PM by Granger Meador
  • Pressbox steel going up; new buses out on routes YouTube Video of Steel Lift for Pressbox During the first week of March 2020, structural steel for the new pressbox atop Custer Stadium was lifted by cranes and installed. The ...
    Posted Mar 5, 2020, 12:44 PM by Granger Meador
  • Bond projects continue through winter months BOND UPDATE SLIDESHOW During the winter of 2019-2020, various projects funded by the August 2019 bond issue have been underway, and the district is busy placing orders made possible ...
    Posted Feb 28, 2020, 9:17 AM by Granger Meador
  • Bond projects over Winter Break 2019-2020 Over the 2019-2020 Winter Break, the old pressbox atop Custer Stadium was removed to allow for the construction of a much larger and more functional pressbox. The infield at ...
    Posted Feb 16, 2020, 5:37 AM by Granger Meador
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 29. View more »
QUESTIONS? 

First, please check our 2019 or 2016 FAQ. If you can't find the answers you need, please ask in an email to questions@bruinbond.com.

2019 BOND ISSUE SUMMARY
Voters approved $17,915,000 for projects that include:
  • Technology: Extend the successful districtwide Chromebooks initiative through the 2022-23 school year while replacing decade-old electronic whiteboards in all elementary school classrooms with bright touchscreen panels.
  • STEM/Vo-Ag: Build a classroom/shop for the new vocational agriculture program and refresh the K-12 STEM devices and equipment to keep that award-winning program up-to-date.
  • Maintenance and Facilities: Replace climate control systems and elevators that are over 50 years old, along with many other maintenance needs at our school sites, which are 34 to 101 years of age. Also replace the 65-year-old pressbox so it can finally serve community needs, with about 1/3 of its cost paid by private funds.
  • Safety: Extend past safety enhancements which have proven to work, including more cameras, updated entry kiosks, improved doors and locks, and safer pedestrian crossings.
  • Transportation: Replace all buses that are over a decade old to further increase the bus fleet's efficiency and reliability.
2016 BOND ISSUE SUMMARY
Voters approved $19.4 million over a five year period for multiple purposes:
Saving Jobs & Preserving Class Sizes
The primary focus of the bond issue was to compensate for huge cuts in state funding since 2009. The district suffered multiple state revenue shortfalls in 2016 and cut 5% of its teachers as well as additional administrators and support staff. The bonds allow the district to shift more operational costs from its general fund to bond issue funds to prevent additional staffing cuts and increases in class sizes.
Improving Instructional Technology, Equipment, and Facilities
The bond will continue to provide students with instructional technology, physical and digital textbooks, STEM programs in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, and maintain buildings and update classrooms and their furnishings.
Targeted High-Priority Renovations
The bond provided improvements in existing facilities previously identified as top priorities by community members on the district's Long Range Facilities Planning Committee, but which bond capacity limits prevented us from addressing in the 2013 reconfiguration bond issue.

Late May 2020 Bond Projects Update

posted May 30, 2020, 11:18 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated May 30, 2020, 11:21 AM ]

Projects and programs funded by the 2019 bond issue continue to progress despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Some students will have virtual learning experiences this summer made possible by technology purchased via bond funding, and many will be able to take advantage of new and improved facilities in the coming school year.

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

Pressbox

Pressbox east facade
The pressbox is ahead of schedule; click image to enlarge

The new pressbox atop Custer Stadium is ahead of schedule and will be ready before classes start in August. It features vastly improved facilities for community media, home and visitor coaches, visiting media, and student media, along with a small hospitality room. All of the rooms and a video balcony provide sweeping views of Lyon Field in a much more comfortable environment than the 65-year-old metal shed that sat atop the stadium since its construction.

Pressbox Interior
Two of the media rooms in the new pressbox, with the video balcony on the far left; click image to enlarge

Alley view

An elevator in the alley on the west side of the stadium will provide handicapped access to the pressbox. The elevator will also stop at the top concession stand level of the interior of the stadium, making it easier to load the concession stands versus using the original dumbwaiter from 1954.

Agriculture Building

Agriculture building exterior

The new agriculture building is being constructed on the south end of the Bartlesville High School (BHS) campus across 18th Street and just west of the Bruin Activity Center indoor practice facility. 

The northern end of the building will be an agricultural mechanics lab with welding capability, a tool room, and garage door. 

Ag Lab Space
Future agriculture mechanics lab

The southern end of the building will have two classrooms able to accommodate both Marty Jones, who started the district's agriculture education program in 2019-2020, and new hire Cameron Dale, who will be teaching 8th-grade agriculture orientation classes at Central and Madison middle schools and Agriscience 1 at BHS.

Ag classroom space
Future classroom space in the new agriculture building

Other Summer Construction Projects

Central Loop
At Central Middle School, a road cut into Cherokee Avenue off the north end of the parking lot on the north side of Central will allow that lot to function as a student pick-up and drop-off loop before and after school, relieving some of the congestion on Cherokee Avenue.

There will also be parking improvements at Ranch Heights Elementary School.

Madison Middle School will have additional work to finish replacing the last remnants of the original HVAC systems, which date back to when the facility was built as Sooner High School in 1966. A new serving line will be installed in what is now the Commons, located in the former Sooner High shop area, to support meal service relocated from the original cafeteria, where the old steam tables had reached their end of life.

Work will proceed on installing a motorized lift for the orchestra pit at the Fine Arts Center at Bartlesville High School. Since its opening in 2003, when not in use the pit has had to be manually converted into a stage extension by a system of scaffolding and flooring. The motorized lift will eliminate many man-hours of work for conversions each year, increasing the functionality of the superb facility.

TECHNOLOGY

Virtual Summer Schools

The district has four summer school programs in June, with two continuing on into July. All four are able to be virtual programs thanks to Chromebooks and hotspots funded by the 2016 and 2019 bond issues.
Chromebook and hotspot


About 100 elementary school students were selected for and enrolled in the Summer Boost program, which will run from June 1-June 25. Their parents can check out a new Chromebook and, if needed, a cellular hotspot for internet service. The initial wave of devices were distributed at a drive-through at BHS on May 28, and the Chromebooks will be returned on June 26.

Over 140 students have enrolled in a Virtual Summer Academy at Jane Phillips Elementary, which will run from June 1-July 16, again with available Chromebooks and hotspots.

The teachers in both elementary programs have been training on using the Google Classroom learning management platform to help provide lessons, and students can also draw upon both free and district-paid online services.

Students who are not in summer school can still use online services linked at BPSLEARN.COM.

Virtual Summer School for grades 6-8 is being offered June 1-22 and is being offered for grades 9-12 in two sessions, from June 1-22 and also June 29-July 20. The students will be using the take-home Chromebooks they were issued for the 2019-2020 school year. The program will make use of the Canvas Learning Management System which, like almost all district technology services, is funded by bond issues. Cellular hotspots have been available for students in grades 6-12 since early April.

Students in summer programs can swap out devices as needed on Wednesdays from 10-11 a.m. at BHS through July 15, except for July 1. If it rains on a Wednesday, that swap shifts to Thursday.

Preparing for Distance Learning in 2020-2021
Chromebook Carts
We expect that some students may elect to remain in Distance Learning when classes begin in August, and health experts predict periodic school closures might be needed in 2020-2021 with an expected surge in viral cases in autumn and winter. So the district will be working through the summer to outfit classroom Chromebook carts for grades 3-5 and has ordered 2,200 additional Chromebooks for PreKindergarten through 2nd grade, which are expected to be available in early autumn. A mix of bond issue and federal stimulus funding is being used, and spare Chromebooks purchased with bond funding will be available for students whose families elect to remain in Distance Learning. Additional cellular hotspots will be purchased via a $100,000 grant from Phillips 66 via the Bartlesville Regional United Way.

Chromebook carts like these are expected to be in every classroom from 3rd through 5th grade in August, with carts of touchscreen Chromebooks in every PreKindergarten through 2nd Grade classroom in early autumn

Bond issues also fund the electronic textbooks and services for subjects such as English, math, science, and social studies, and many different paid online services which students access via the Clever portal.

Remind, New Websites, and Mobile App
Annual bond issue funding for technology services is also allowing the district to update its communications. Enhanced Remind messaging services were purchased for 2019-2020 and became vital for many parent and student communications when the pandemic forced the schools into Distance Learning in April and May. Later this summer the district will launch new websites and a mobile app, the latter available for both Android and Apple iOS devices.

New district website coming

New district websites and a mobile app will launch later this summer.

Promethean ActivPanels

During the May shutdown of the school buildings, new Promethean ActivPanels, which are large touchscreens with built-in apps and connections to teachers' classroom stations, were installed in every classroom at Ranch Heights, Wayside, and Wilson elementary schools. These replaced the older ActivBoard "electronic whiteboards", which relied entirely on a teacher's desktop computer and ceiling-mounted projectors. 

ActivPanel

The three remaining elementary schools will be updated from ActivBoards to ActivPanels in the summer of 2021. The best of the displaced ActivBoards are being repurposed for over a dozen remaining classrooms at Bartlesville High School which have ceiling projectors but are not yet equipped with electronic whiteboards. Now almost every classroom in the district will have a wall with interactive touch capability for teacher use and, when safety protocols and measures allow it, for student interaction.

On-Going Operational Expenses

The bond issues also continue to provide annual funding for STEM, science, athletics, fine arts, furniture, maintenance, safety, and transportation needs across the district. Thanks to the regular investment by the voters within the district, it will continue to be a great time to a Bruin.

April 2020 Bond Projects Update

posted Apr 12, 2020, 3:43 PM by Granger Meador   [ updated Apr 12, 2020, 4:14 PM ]

Funding from the 2016 bond issue made it possible for the district to shift to online learning for middle school and high school students for the remainder of the 2019-2020 academic year. Various construction and technology projects continue, thanks to funding from the 2019 bond issue.

Hotspots for new Connected Bruins program

Hotspot with Chromebook
In mid-March, the school board approved the purchase of 275 cellular hotspots for a new Connected Bruins program. They support the transition to telecommuting and distance learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic by providing limited internet data to homes for which other low-cost internet options are not feasible.

In late March and early April, a few dozen were issued to staff, and on Good Friday the first wave of over 100 hotspots was made available to middle school and high school students who could use them for online learning. Additional hotspots will continue to be issued by advance arrangement through students' teachers and principals.

The district is also exploring community funding to support the future purchase of additional hotspots to allow the online learning model to be extended into the upper elementary grades during the 2020-2021 academic year if that should prove necessary and desirable. 

Chromebooks

The shift to online learning for grades 6-12 was made possible by the years-long investment in devices, support, and training for 1:1 Chromebooks and related services, mostly funded by the 2016 bond issue. Before the pandemic, the district had already ordered enough carts and Chromebooks to provide them for all fifth-grade students in August 2020. Those will arrive and be outfitted in the coming months. The district will consider using federal stimulus funding to purchase additional carts and devices for more elementary grade levels. That, combined with cellular hotspots, would support a transition to online learning in the upper elementary grades during part of the 2020-2021 academic year should that prove necessary.
Chromebook Carts

Safety Projects

The crosswalk at Bartlesville High School was installed and operating for student use before the pandemic shut down the schools and will help students safely cross Hillcrest Drive in the years to come. The district purchased the crosswalk equipment with 2019 bond funding, and the City of Bartlesville installed the units.
BHS Crosswalk
A bid will soon be awarded to replace the district's security cameras and related servers while greatly expanding the number of cameras and thus enhancing coverage across the district's campuses. In the coming weeks, all exterior door locks and some exterior doors will be updated. 

Elementary Instruction Touchscreens

The 2019 bond issue funded upgrading all elementary classrooms from electronic whiteboards with projectors to large, bright touchscreens. The touchscreens for Ranch Heights, Wayside, and Wilson elementary schools have arrived and will be installed in the coming months. Similar updates will be made at the other three elementary schools in the summer of 2021.

Custer Stadium Pressbox

Pressbox concrete pour
Construction continues on the new pressbox at Custer Stadium, funded by the 2019 bond issue. There is now exterior and interior framing, concrete has been poured, and exterior sheathing going up.

The masonry for the elevator shaft in the alleyway is complete. Eventually, the blue chairbacks at Custer Stadium will be replaced.
Pressbox Elevator Shaft


Pressbox Progress

Agriculture Building

The agriculture building at the south end of the high school campus is also making good progress, with exterior and interior framing. Soon it will be roofed and have more of its exterior completed.
Ag Building

Baseball & Softball Infields Turfed

Rigdon Field
The infields of Rigdon Field at Doenges Memorial Stadium downtown and the Lady Bruins softball field near Madison Middle School now sport artificial turf. When conditions allow, we look forward to dedicating Rigdon Field.
Lady Bruins Softball Turf

Central Tuck and Seal

Central Middle School's masonry is about a century old and requires regular tuck and seal treatments against moisture penetration. The latest round of that ongoing maintenance is nearing completion.

Pressbox steel going up; new buses out on routes

posted Mar 5, 2020, 12:43 PM by Granger Meador   [ updated Mar 5, 2020, 12:44 PM ]


Steel lift
During the first week of March 2020, structural steel for the new pressbox atop Custer Stadium was lifted by cranes and installed.



The latest new buses, funded by the 2019 bond issue, were also received and have been put to work hauling students.
New bus
Thanks to the recent bond issues, all of the district's route buses are now 2017 or newer models. This has greatly improved fuel efficiency and reliability and reduced repair costs. 

Bond projects continue through winter months

posted Feb 28, 2020, 8:41 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated Feb 28, 2020, 9:17 AM ]

Bond Update

During the winter of 2019-2020, various projects funded by the August 2019 bond issue have been underway, and the district is busy placing orders made possible by the 2016 and 2019 bond issues. Below are updates as of late February 2020.

Agriculture building

The in-ground work and slab for the agriculture building on the south end of the Bartlesville High School campus is complete. Soon structural steel will be erected. When finished, the two-classroom building will resemble the adjacent Bruin Activity Center indoor practice facility. The district is currently hiring a second agriculture teacher so that a full scope of courses can be offered.

Custer Stadium pressbox

The 65-year-old pressbox was lifted off the stadium over winter break, and the new elevator shaft at the end of the alleyway is under construction.  Steel arrived in late February and has been laid along the alleyway, which is temporarily closed to anyone except construction workers.

Baseball & softball in-field turf

Contractors began laying down the new turf at Rigdon Field at Doenges Memorial Stadium in February, and that baseball field project will soon be complete. The contractors will then move over to the east side of town to install turf on the softball in-field between Hoover Elementary School and Madison Middle School.

5th-grade Chromebook carts

The district has ordered 21 carts with 30 Chromebooks each to equip all 5th-grade classrooms. The six or more Chromebook carts already at each elementary school will then be shared across Pre-Kindergarten through 4th-grade.

Chromebooks for high school teachers

The district has ordered convertible 2-in-1 touchscreen Chromebooks for all high school teachers. Elementary and middle school teachers received similar devices in January 2017 via a state grant. The new devices for high school teachers support a precise active EMR stylus, which will facilitate instruction, especially in the older high school classrooms that lack an electronic whiteboard.

Touchscreen wall panels for elementary schools

Over 100 75" touchscreen Promethean ActivPanels are being ordered for summer installation at Ranch Heights, Wayside, and Wilson elementary schools. Those schools had the most first-generation Promethean ActivBoards which are finally wearing out after a decade or more of heavy use. Hoover, Jane Phillips, and Richard Kane classrooms will be updated in the summer of 2021. The new ActivPanels are bright, include built-in instructional apps, and respond to both pens and fingers.

Camera upgrade coming

A Request for Proposal will soon be posted here at BRUINBOND.COM to replace hundreds of indoor and outdoor security cameras across the district. The project will also update the camera servers and almost double the number of cameras overall.

Bond projects over Winter Break 2019-2020

posted Jan 3, 2020, 1:22 PM by Granger Meador   [ updated Feb 16, 2020, 5:37 AM ]

Over the 2019-2020 Winter Break, the old pressbox atop Custer Stadium was removed to allow for the construction of a much larger and more functional pressbox. The infield at Doenges Memorial Stadium was also dug out to allow for installation of artificial turf on Rigdon Field. Both projects were overwhelmingly approved by voters in an August 2019 bond issue election. 

On December 16, 2019, the school board approved a guaranteed maximum price of $2,492,761 from Manhattan Construction Company for the replacement of the pressbox as well as the construction of a new vocational agriculture building on the south end of the Bartlesville High School campus.

Pressbox

Over Winter Break, a crane lifted away the upper level of the pressbox, which had sat top the stadium for 65 years. 

Pressbox removed


The lower level, which had been enclosed some years back to boost the capacity of the tiny pressbox, was dismantled along with its lower sheeting, exposing the original concrete risers.

Pressbox history

The new pressbox will extend farther north and south atop the stadium, stretching across the three central seating sections.

Pressbox to come

Pressbox rendering

It will include split-level rooms for both visiting media and coaches, home media and coaches, and press and scoreboard functions. There will be an open video balcony and a small hospitality room, along with single-user men's and women's restrooms.

An alley elevator on the west side will provide ADA access to the pressbox as well as ADA access to the top internal concessions and restrooms level of Custer Stadium, allowing for the retirement of the original concessions dumbwaiter.

A temporary "doghouse" for spring sports scoreboard operations will be used during the construction of the new pressbox, which is slated for completion by the start of school in August 2020. 

Agriculture building


The new vocational agriculture building, which will include classroom and shop space, will be constructed on a south parking lot at the high school, near the Bruin Activity Center indoor practice facility. It is also slated for completion for the start of classes in August 2020.

Ag building

Baseball infield


The baseball infield at Doenges Memorial Stadium was also being dug out over Winter Break to allow for the installation of artificial turf on Rigdon Field. In October 2019, the school board approved a $569,400 bid from General Sports Surfaces LLC to replace the infields of the baseball field at Doenges Memorial Stadium downtown as well as the softball field just west of Madison Middle School in the northeast part of the city.
Infield removal

Infield removal panorama

Central tuck-and-seal
In November 2019 the school board approved a $129,146 bid from Jim Martin Sr. for a tuck and seal project on the exterior brick at Central Middle School. The building is over a century old and requires this periodic work to reduce the penetration of moisture through the exterior masonry which otherwise damages the interior plaster walls. Bond issues in 2013 and 2016 funded major renovations at Central.

Madison HVAC & serving line
In November the board also approved $109,000 for the installation of 8 HVAC units at Madison Middle School and $15,217 for 8 additional units for the school's gyms. These projects will help complete the replacement of all of the original HVAC equipment at the site, which was installed over a half-century ago when it opened as Sooner High School. The board also approved  $14,898.76 to re-tube a boiler at Bartlesville High School.

In October the board approved $10,632 for a hot food serving counter from Curtis Restaurant Supply to replace a failing serving line at Madison's cafeteria.

Safety improvements
The school board has approved $9,000 for weighted roll-down shades for the windows in classroom doors for use across the district during lockdowns. It also approved $40,000 for a dozen new LobbyGuard kiosks for visitor screening at school sites. Those will be used to replace existing LobbyGuard units at each school site as needed.

The board approved $18,415.32 to Pinkley Sales Co. for a solar-powered lighted school crossing system to be installed at 18th Street and Hillcrest Drive to improve the safety of Bartlesville High School students who park in the small lot across Hillcrest Drive. The district pays for the equipment while the City of Bartlesville graciously covers its installation. Additional crosswalk systems for other priority crossing needs will be purchased in the coming months.

In the coming months, the existing security camera systems across the district will be replaced and many additional cameras will be installed.

More to come

By the end of the spring 2020 semester, new route buses will be received, completing the update of the fleet with all buses being from 2016 or later. The older buses will be designated as surplus and available for auction in the summer.

Work will continue over the summer of 2020 with the construction of expanded parking at Ranch Heights Elementary, a car line drive at Central Middle school, the installation of an orchestra stage lift in the BHS Fine Arts Center, and replacing original elevators at Madison Middle School and Bartlesville High School. 

The decade-old electronic whiteboards and classroom ceiling projectors at Ranch Heights, Wayside, and Wilson elementary schools will be replaced by new touchscreen displays over the summer, with the remaining three elementary schools receiving that upgrade the following summer. The schools to go first were the ones with the highest numbers of original electronic whiteboards, which are reaching the end of their service life.

Bond funding will also provide new social studies curricular materials for the 2020-2021 academic year, such as electronic textbooks for secondary school students to use with their Chromebooks. It will also fund Chromebook carts for each fifth-grade classroom at each of the six elementary schools for 2020-2021.

Bids awarded for turf on Rigdon Field at Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium and at softball field

posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:08 PM by Granger Meador   [ updated Oct 24, 2019, 5:26 AM ]

The district has begun awarding bids from initial funding from the bond issues which over 80% of voters approved in August 2019.
Spence Rigdon
On Monday, October 21, 2019 the Bartlesville Board of Education approved naming the baseball field at Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium after long-time coach Spence Rigdon
As part of a $16.1 million bond issue approved by 81% of voters in August 2019, the board also awarded a $569,400 bid from General Sports Surfaces to install artificial turf on the infields of Rigdon Field at Doenges Memorial Stadium as well as the softball field near Madison Middle School. The baseball field installation should be completed before spring 2019 with the softball field completed later.

Spence Rigdon is currently the school district’s Athletics and Activities Director and was instrumental in the effort to have the baseball field and stadium transferred from the city to the district in 2016 so that the district could invest in renovations and maintenance of the historic facility.

Mr. Rigdon is in the final stages of his life due to the ravages of colon cancer, which he was diagnosed with three and a half years ago. After numerous surgeries and extensive treatment, he is now transitioning to hospice care. Concerning Rigdon’s battle with cancer, Superintendent Chuck McCauley has stated, “Spence is the toughest person I have ever known.” 

Mr. Rigdon has positively influenced many lives through his coaching in baseball and other sports, teaching, church, athletics administration, and community involvement. He taught social studies in the Bartlesville Public Schools for 18 years including a long stint in the district’s alternative high school program. He served as a district varsity baseball coach for thirteen years. In 2015, he was the recipient of the annual Kurt Schmoldt Teacher Appreciation Award and soon after that earned a master’s degree. In June of 2018, he became the Director of Athletics and Activities. 

A Bartlesville native, Rigdon is a 1991 graduate of Bartlesville High School. He attended Kansas City Community College and graduated from Pittsburg State University in Kansas, where he played baseball. Rigdon began his career as the head baseball coach in Marysville, Kansas in 1996 while also coaching junior-level football and basketball. He later returned to Bartlesville to coach junior high football and basketball and freshman baseball. In 2001, he began coaching varsity football and was named the varsity assistant coach in baseball in 2004 before his stint as head coach. 

Spence’s wife, Christina, is a Family Support Coordinator for Title I schools in the district. They have three children: Rilee (19), Bradee (16), and Cy (11). A Go Fund Me account has been created to support the Rigdon family at https://www.gofundme.com/f/7u39w-bless-the-spence-rigdon-family

Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium
Stadium

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE STADIUM & FIELD

CURRENT USES

The city has not had its own baseball team for many years, but Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium has long been the home of the Bartlesville Bruins baseball team. It has also been the home of the local American Legion Baseball Program and other area teams. The Stadium twice hosted the American Legion World Series, in 2003 and 2007, and for several years has hosted the Sandy Koufax World Series of the American Amateur Baseball Congress. The district supports use of the stadium by other teams.

EARLY BASEBALL IN BARTLESVILLE

Bartlesville has been a baseball town since its first team, the Brickbats, formed in 1895. The early-day teams had a community ballpark with a roofed grandstand for 500 spectators at what was the south end of the city near Johnstone Avenue and 11th Street. That park was quickly abandoned for a new stadium just south of there, which hosted 53 home games for the Bartlesville Grays. In 1907 the city purchased land just north of the city limits from William Johnstone on the allotment of his daughter, Nellie Johnstone, at the north end of Dewey Avenue - the site of present-day Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium.

BARTLESVILLE MUNICIPAL ATHLETIC FIELD

The first lights over the field were lit in October 1916. The wooden grandstand was replaced by today's roofed concrete facility via a $42,000 bond issue in 1930. It was dedicated as Municipal Athletic Field on May 2, 1932, and besides baseball games has hosted parades, boxing matches, rodeos, celebrations, and revivals. It even served as the high school football field until Custer Stadium was built in the early 1950s at College High School.

Contractor James H. Hamilton built the stadium and concrete fence. The stadium was known as the only professional ballpark in the world with the same distance (340 feet) to the fence anywhere in fair territory, although today the home plate has moved so the field is no longer fully symmetrical.

BILL DOENGES MEMORIAL STADIUM

In 1997 the Bartlesville Municipal Athletic Field was renamed Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium in appreciation of nearly 60 years of support provided by Bill Doenges to the American Legion baseball program, with the Doenges Ford Injuns teams, which were later renamed the Doenges Indians. That league began a tournament in 1959 which became a city tradition and was later renamed the Glen Winget Tournament in memory of a beloved baseball manager who had been instrumental in starting it. The 60th Annual Glen Winget Memorial Baseball Tournament was held at the stadium in July 2019.

In 1998 Bartlesville began bidding to host the American Legion World Series and won the bid for 2003. $1.25 million was spent renovating the stadium, and the city again hosted the event in 2007.

TRANSFER OF OWNERSHIP

In June 2016 the City of Bartlesville and Bartlesville Public School District approved the transfer of the Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium from the city to the district. Spence Rigdon was instrumental in that change, which allowed the district to invest bond issue dollars in major improvements to the pressbox and locker rooms and now to install artificial turf on the infield. The transfer also allowed the district to sell the ad space at the stadium and utilize the proceeds in maintaining the treasured and historic facility. 
Just as there is now Lyon Field at Custer Stadium for the football program at Bartlesville High School, there will now be Rigdon Field at Bill Doenges Memorial Stadium for the baseball program. There is no plan to change the name of the Stadium itself, and part of the agreement between the city and the school district for the transfer of the property was that the city would have to be consulted before the stadium's name could be changed or any significant changes made to its façade. Rigdon's name will be instead be incorporated into the design of the new artificial turf on the in-field, funded by a 2019 school district bond issue.

Public invited to board meetings on next bond issue

posted Feb 22, 2019, 11:16 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated Feb 22, 2019, 11:17 AM ]

On March 27 and April 24, the school board will hold public meetings at noon in the high school’s Hospitality Room to gather community input on the next bond issues.

In 2016, Bartlesville voters overwhelmingly approved bond issues totaling $19.4 million over a five-year period. The primary focus was to compensate for huge cuts in state funding since 2009, including multiple state revenue shortfalls in 2016 which forced the district to cut 5% of its teachers as well as additional administrators and support staff.

The bonds allowed the district to shift more operational costs from its general fund to bond issue funds to prevent additional staffing cuts and increases in class sizes in 2017 and beyond. The bonds expanded on operational funding being provided via a 2012 bond issue, extending that support across 2019-20 and 2020-21.

While Bartlesville voters were willing to shore up the district’s finances, the statewide pressures reached a boiling point in the spring of 2018. The legislature, pressured by a statewide teacher walkout, finally raised taxes to fund a $6,100 average increase in teacher salaries. During the 8-day teacher walkout, Bartlesville community members and organizations supported teachers and students, including helping distribute meals and providing daycare opportunities.

However, the increased state funding for schools was almost entirely devoted to salaries and, because of how the money was distributed, Bartlesville Public Schools did not actually receive enough funding from the state to cover all of the cost of the mandated raises.

Consequently, the district still lacks sufficient operational funding. Only because Bartlesville voters continue to support local bond issues has the district been able to avoid the loss of fine arts, world languages, and similar electives which have been eliminated or reduced in too many other districts. Since bond issue monies cannot be spent on salaries or other non-capital items, the district has still been forced to cut staff in recent years as well as eliminate some elective programs such as Family and Consumer Science.

It appears likely that in August district voters will be asked to consider additional bond issues to address the district’s ongoing operational needs and continue to update its bus fleet and facilities.
The 2016 bond already funded the replacement of all buses older than 2004. The district will be seeking additional funding to replace 13 route buses that were purchased in 2009 or earlier, along with a few other vehicles, to boost the fleet’s efficiency and reliability.

The district will also be seeking operational funding for technology, curriculum, and maintenance needs as well as safety improvements and a few high-priority facility projects.

A significant curricular change funded by the 2016 bond issue is a Student Computing Initiative which is providing take-home Chromebooks to the students at Bartlesville High School. That program will extend to both middle schools in August and will be funding Chromebook carts at each elementary school.  The 2016 bond also funds the purchase of both physical and electronic textbooks along with a variety of instructional and operational software. 

A new bond issue would seek to extend funding for those technology initiatives for two additional years and provide funding to replace the district’s electronic whiteboards in the elementary schools, many of which have been in use for a decade and are approaching their end-of-life, while maintaining the district’s technology infrastructure and services.

Other operational needs funded by the 2016 bond issue which would be extended for two years by a new bond issue include funding for fine arts and athletics uniforms and equipment, science and STEM equipment, and a long list of maintenance projects needed at the district’s school sites. The newest site in the district, Jane Phillips Elementary, is 35 years old and the main buildings at the other sites are even older, with Central Middle School as the oldest operating school site; its western part was built 102 years ago. Regular maintenance is vital for the aging structures, and HVAC and lighting updates will be needed in the years to come to improve their efficiency.

The public is welcome to attend the noon meetings on March 27 and April 24 in the BHS Hospitality Room to learn more about the proposed bond issues and provide feedback on their development.

Major Facility Projects Completed

Beyond operational funding, the 2016 bond issue included $5.7 million in facility projects. You can see visual updates on them here at BRUINBOND.COM. All of the promised facility projects are now complete, including:
  • Renovating 7,000 square feet of existing spaces at Madison Middle School and Bartlesville High School to serve instrumental and choral music programs.
  • Adding a bus loop at Madison Middle School, replacing part of its climate control system, and renovating its auditorium.
  • Renovating the auditorium at Central Middle School, which was the only portion of that campus not addressed in a 2013 bond issue.
  • Renovating existing spaces in the 1939 Phillips Field House and the 2009 Bruin Activity Center to provide dedicated spaces for the pom and cheer programs, a relocated athletics weight room, and more dedicated space for wrestling.
  • Renovation of the lower level of Custer Stadium to provide locker rooms for soccer, track, cross country, and tennis.
  • Resurfacing of the Doornbos Track at BHS and replacement of the decrepit tennis courts with a new and expanded facility.
  • Adding a locker room at the softball facility west of Madison Middle School and renovating the baseball press box and locker rooms at Doenges Memorial Stadium.
The district is always careful to budget sufficiently so that all promised facility projects can be completed. Once the above projects were completed and after ensuring bond issue funding was preserved for ongoing operational and maintenance needs, the district was able to fund the replacement of the turf on Lyon Field at Custer Stadium as described below.

New turf completed on Lyon Field at Custer Stadium

In February the new turf at the high school was completed. It replaced the turf installed in 2008 via a $650,000 donation from the Lyon Foundation, fulfilling the district's long-term commitment to the Foundation. Supt. Chuck McCauley shared, "We are very fortunate that the Lyon Foundation paid for the turf originally. The agreement was that the foundation would pay for it, and the district would maintain it and replace it when it was time.” Funding for the turf replacement came from the district's 2016 bond issue once all large promised facility projects were completed, while preserving bond issue funding for ongoing operational and maintenance needs.

The new turf will make Bartlesville High School the first in the state to feature a shock padding underlay with AstroTurf Rootzone 3D3 Blend to provide better shock absorbency and protection for players. The shock pad will be installed between the sub-base layer and the turf and includes a 25-year warranty. Superintendent McCauley has stated, "I am really excited about the opportunity to install a shock pad and feel like this is the best product for our students." The new turf is the type that has been used for practice facilities at OSU and OU. The new turf logos use Lagoon Blue as a match for the light blue of the Bruins, navy blue, and white, with different shades of green every 10 yards. 

Since the photo below was taken, temporary soccer lines have been painted on the field for soccer season which will be renewed annually.

New turf on Lyon Field at Custer Stadium



Old turf removed from Lyon Field

posted Jan 24, 2019, 8:08 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated Jan 24, 2019, 8:09 AM ]

Turf removal panorama

In December the Bartlesville Board of Education approved a $452,000 contract with United Turf and Track of Edmond to replace the artificial turf on Lyon Field at Custer Stadium. The former grass Custer Field was renamed the E. H. "Ted" Lyon Field at Custer Stadium in 2008 in recognition of a $650,000 donation by the Lyon Foundation to install Momentum 41 artificial turf. 

That initial installation has reached the end of its projected ten-year lifespan. Supt. Chuck McCauley shared, "We are very fortunate that the Lyon Foundation paid for the turf originally. The agreement was that the foundation would pay for it, and the district would maintain it and replace it when it was time.” Drainage improvements made as part of the initial installation reduced the cost of the replacement, with funding for the turf replacement coming from the district's 2016 bond issue. 

The new turf will make Bartlesville High School the first in the state to feature a shock padding underlay with AstroTurf Rootzone 3D3 Blend to provide better shock absorbency and protection for players. The shock pad will be installed between the sub-base layer and the turf and includes a 25-year warranty. Superintendent McCauley has stated, "I am really excited about the opportunity to install a shock pad and feel like this is the best product for our students."

The new turf scheduled to arrive on campus on Friday, January 25 is the type that has been used for practice facilities at OSU and OU. The district is wanting the new installation completed around February 23 before Bruin soccer starts in early March, with a $1,000 penalty option if the target date is not met.

The new turf logos will use Lagoon Blue as a match for the light blue of the Bruins, navy blue, and white, with different shades of green every 10 yards. Instead of permanent soccer lines, temporary ones will be painted on for soccer season and should flake off with the weather over time.

The used turf has been made available for uses around Bartlesville, with the city opting to take some for use at Price Field and other organizations taking advantage of the opportunity.



Turf rolled up
The turf installed in 2008 has been rolled up and removed from Lyon Field

Removed turf rolls
Some of the rolls of removed turf have been claimed by the city and other organizations for re-use elsewhere

Bond Issue Oversight Committee Tour

posted Nov 4, 2018, 10:36 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated Nov 4, 2018, 10:39 AM ]

In July 2018 the Bond Issue Oversight Committee toured the completed bond issue projects at Bartlesville High School, Central Middle School, and Madison Middle School.

Bartlesville High School
 Activity IssueBond Issue Solution 
High School Band and Orchestra9th-12th grade instrumental music programs were overflowing space built for grades 11-12Reconfigured 1939 Phillips Field House to provide additional instrumental music room with adjacent storage. Room off Fine Arts Center lobby remodeled into Color Guard practice room.
High School Choir9th-12th grade choir program was overflowing space built for grades 11-12Renovated former Fine Arts Center Flex Lab into an additional choir ensemble room.
High School Physical Education, Wrestling, Pom, and Cheer1939 Phillips Field House (old gym) was not configured well for current uses; physical education locker rooms were inadequate, wrestling needed more room, pom and cheer needed more appropriate practice spaces, etc.Reconfigured 1939 Phillips Field House to form better physical education locker rooms, larger wrestling room, and supporting offices. 1968 auxiliary gym remodeled into pom practice room with adjacent classroom remodeled into pom locker room. 1968 small gym remodeled.

Reconfigured Bruin Activity Center (indoor practice facility) now has dedicated high-ceiling space for cheer program and space for athletics weight training.
High School Soccer, Track, Cross Country, and TennisInadequate locker roomsReconfigured bottom level of Custer Stadium to provide appropriate locker rooms for boys and girls sports.
High School TrackThe Doornbos track, built in 1988 with some edge and marking renovations in 2004, had a worn out surface that had to be replaced.Track resurfaced by spring 2017.
High School TennisThe five decrepit courts at BHS were the worst in the conference, with unsafe surfaces, inadequate seating, and too few courts for tournaments.Five courts demolished. Six new courts with seating and grassy side area constructed.
High School SoftballSoftball field across town at Madison Middle School lacked a locker room; students traveled across parking lots to use old lockers in the Madison building.The only new square footage in the bond issue added an approximately 1000 square foot locker room at the softball field. That freed up space to allow Madison's locker rooms to be reworked to provide needed music practice and storage space.
High School BaseballThe district had been successfully operating and maintaining the stadium since 2015, while allowing other programs, including American Legion baseball, to use the stadium. The 2016 transfer of ownership from the city to the district allowed the district to capture lease revenue. The transfer of ownership did NOT increase operating costs for the district.In 2017 the stadium roof was repaired, joints in the stands were resealed, the HVAC was replaced, the lounge floor was leveled and old plumbing removed, and the pressbox and locker room were renovated.
Central Middle School

Via the 2012 bond issue, almost the entire building was renovated in 2015-16 and a new gymnasium was constructed. The 2016 bond issue allowed the auditorium to be renovated with audiovisual updates, plaster repairs, paint, new carpet, new seating on the main floor, and repairs to historic seating in the balcony, which had a glass safety rail added.

Madison Middle School

All of the remaining original HVAC systems were replaced. The former shops were renovated into a commons with a bus loop drive. The auditorium seating was replaced, the stage repaired, and the audiovisual systems updated. The choir room was relocated and the former choir room repurposed for orchestra. The flooring, paint, and lighting were updated in the main gym and auxiliary gym. The cafeteria was repainted and new furniture provided. The office was also renovated.

Madison Cafeteria


District provides Chromebooks to students and staff

posted Jan 25, 2018, 9:08 AM by Granger Meador   [ updated Jan 25, 2018, 5:05 PM ]

August 2017 Freshman Academy Chromebook Rollout Video

Chromebook
Bartlesville Public Schools has been working to improve its instructional technology, drawing upon bond issue funding approved by voters as well as community donations and federal grants.

Here's an overview of the progress made since 2016 on the district's Student Computing Initiative, which is transforming the learning environment.



Chromebooks for Students

In August 2016, district voters approved a bond issue that included funding to gradually deploy Chromebooks to all secondary students over four years.

Student Computing Initiative Timeline
The district's long-term plan for student computing devices

Teachers Wiring Chromebook Carts
In fall 2016 the district purchased a dozen Chromebook charging carts with a total of almost 400 Chromebooks. The photo shows several of the high school teachers who volunteered to help wire up the carts. The carts have been used since then in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grade English classrooms.

In 2016-2017, 29 teachers set up 52 online courses at the high school in its new Canvas Learning Management System. That year 1,222 students completed 2,321 assignments in Canvas and participated in 946 electronic discussions.

This heavy adoption, before any take-home devices were deployed, was promoted by an online Kung Fu Canvas course of instructional videos and assignments, given inside of Canvas, to high school teachers. Teachers received instructional equipment incentives they could use in their teaching as they completed each of six phases of training, earning different Kung Fu Canvas "Belts". 

Granger Meador
By May 2017, 88 teachers at the high school had earned three belts, completing the first half of that training, and they have the opportunity to earn the remaining belts this academic year. By the end of the first semester of 2017-2018, 34 teachers had completed the entire training course, earning all six belts. Granger Meador, who leads the program as the district's Executive Director of Technology and Communication, expects many more will continue working through the training this year, spurred on by equipment incentives, the opportunity to make up an inclement weather day via in-service points, and their desire to harness the new technology to improve their students' learning.

Granger Meador issues a Chromebook to a freshman
Granger Meador issues a Chromebook to a Freshman Academy student

This school year, 444 Chromebooks have been issued to freshmen for use both at school and at home. Each Chromebook has its own always-on case with a stitched Bruins logo. 

Freshman Academy Chromebooks

The take-home Chromebooks in the Freshman Academy and the Chromebook carts in the 10-12 English classrooms have led 69 teachers to offer 118 courses in Canvas to 1,677 students at the high school. Those students submitted almost 3,000 digital assignments in the first semester. 

The shift to digital assignments has already dramatically changed college instruction and is making its way into the nation's secondary schools. A 2016 meta-analysis of 65 journal articles and 31 doctoral dissertations concluded that providing each student with a computing device led to:
  • significantly increased academic achievement in science, writing, math, and English
  • more student-centered, individualized, and project-based instruction
  • enhanced engagement and enthusiasm among students
  • improved teacher-student and parent-school relationships
Realizing that a $250 device with charger and carrying case that travels to and from school each day would carry risks of damage and loss, over 400 of the Freshman Academy students' parents opted to purchase a $25 annual insurance plan which provides full damage/loss coverage for a first incident and half coverage for a second one during the year. The district runs the insurance program and uses the premiums to operate its new Student Technology Support Team (STST) classes at the high school.

Wendy Meador
Wendy Meador, a certified high school teacher who had previous experience in technical support and PC repair before she began teaching in Bartlesville in 2007, leads the STST. The class had six student technicians in its first semester and seven for its second semester. These students offered troubleshooting, maintenance, and repair for all high school Chromebooks, with about 1/4 of the freshmen using their services during the first semester.

The student technicians have found that rebooting or reinstalling the Chrome operating system are the most common solutions for a mind-bogglingly diverse mix of user issues. Some Chromebooks suffer hardware failures such as power issues or cracked screens, like the one that STST member Andrea Hernandez prepares to replace in the photo below. The students created a video highlighting common issues.

Students' Chromebook Safety Video

Andrea Hernandez with cracked Chromebook screen
Ms. Meador reported that 7% of insured students had damage/loss incidents in the first semester, including 19 cracked screens. While Dell did not consider the glued-in screens replaceable parts, Ms. Meador used the insurance premiums to purchase replacements, and her students successfully repaired the devices. In the photo, STST members Olive Foust, Artturi DeBlieck, and Logan Gray are shown replacing Chromebook screens.

Olivia Foust, Artturi DeBlieck, and Logan Gray work on Chromebooks
Student Technology Support Team students repairing Chromebooks


Ms. Meador and her students also support technology throughout the school and assist with deployment and support of staff Chromebooks throughout the district. Current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors may apply to join the program next year, when the STST will be supporting over 1,600 take-home student Chromebooks at the high school, over 500 classroom-based student Chromebooks moving from the high school to the two middle schools, and about 500 Chromebooks used by staff members across the district.

Andrea Hernandez repairs a Chromebook
The interior of a Chromebook being serviced by the STST


Chromebooks for Staff 

It was important for high school staff to have their own Chromebooks in 2016-2017 to help them train and prepare for using them in their instruction. Staff Chromebooks have also made meetings more productive and reduced wasted paper, promoting collaborative work on documents, presentations, and data analysis.

In early January 2018, a federal grant allowed the district to purchase 340 Chromebooks for elementary and middle school staff members. To have them ready for the mid-January in-service day, in only four days the Student Technology Support Team, with the help of the district's Technology Services department one morning plus continuing help from high school librarian Kim Lashbrook and library aides, prepared the devices and outfitted them with cases, chargers, cleaning cloths, stickers, and instructional manuals.

The high school support team helped deploy 340 Chromebooks for elementary and middle school staff members
  The Student Technology Support Team, with the help of the district's Technology Services department one morning plus continuing help from high school librarian Kim Lashbrook and library aides, prepared 340 Chromebooks in early January for the district's elementary and middle school teachers

To help support this deployment, on January 15, 2018 district teachers provided over 21 different 50-minute technology training sessions to their fellow secondary school teachers. The topics included creating video lessons with a Chromebook, creating digital assignments and quizzes in Canvas, tips and tricks for using Chromebooks, and much more.

The Chromebooks were kept a surprise for the elementary teachers. They received on-site training on their new Chromebooks, and were already putting them to use at staff meetings later that week.

Teachers meeting using Chromebooks
Elementary school teachers using their new Chromebooks at a staff meeting

The January inservice day also provided additional teacher training on the STEM Launch computer science modules which are being piloted in all kindergarten through fifth grade classes. Those modules make use of equipment and iPad carts funded by earlier grants from the Bartlesville Public Schools Foundation and ConocoPhillips. Fundraising continues on a $100,000 goal of the Bartlesville Public Schools Foundation to support another set of iPad carts with Biomedical and Engineering modules for 2018-2019.

Elementary STEM iPads
All kindergarten through fifth grade classes are using iPads in the new STEM Launch computer science modules

After the second wave of iPad carts is put to use in the elementary schools in 2018-2019, the district expects to be adding a mix of classroom-based Chromebooks and iPads at each elementary school.

District Support

Lori Patterson
At a recent school board meeting, Mr. Meador highlighted the efforts of Technology Services Director Lori Patterson and the eight technicians she supervises. They keep all of the technology in the district running, including the network infrastructure and services that make it possible for thousands of students and staff to use their Chromebooks, iPads, desktop computers, and printers. 

Ms. Patterson and the technicians support all sorts of technology beyond the obvious computing devices and their wireless and wired networks, including electronic whiteboards, telephones, clocks, intercoms, and security cameras. Needless to say, their expertise is greatly appreciated.

With the continued elimination of state programs for professional development due to inadequate funding, Bartlesville teachers have had to help each other in an era of constant technological change. Technology Services is assisted by teachers and other staff members at each school site who help troubleshoot and address problems, including teachers at the larger middle schools and high school who receive extra duty stipends as site technology assistants. 

Laura Salzyn
Each school also has a teacher who receives an extra duty stipend to provide site-based technology training. Their efforts are coordinated by Laura Salzyn, one of the Teacher Specialists at the district's Education Service Center. Laura also assists with curricular assessments throughout the district.

Angie Linthacum
Angie Linthacum is the district's other Teacher Specialist. She assists with the STEM Launch program and also coordinates the district's English Language Development program which supports students coming from homes where languages other than English are used.




We are working together to modernize our schools

Even in this era of inadequate state budgets, the support of our community and our talented students and staff are allowing us to modernize our schools. The district has made tremendous progress in its use of instructional technology since the successful 2016 bond issue. Continued support from district voters in future bond issues will be critical to maintaining the secondary Chromebook program and expanding the use of computing devices in the elementary schools. This is a long-term investment that promises great rewards in the years to come.



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