Beware of Poison Hemlock!

Poison Hemlock is a noxious weed that exists throughout Lorain County and the State of Ohio. The plant is highly toxic if ingested and irritant if exposed to it. Avoid contact with the plant AND DO NOT BURN IT!


Poison Hemlock is invasive, brought to the US from Europe centuries ago. But experts say its coverage is exploding, and so is the danger.

Amy Stone is an Extension Educator of Agriculture and Natural Resources with the Ohio State University. “It’s very toxic to mammals, to humans and animals,” she tells 13abc. “It’s a concern, both in urban areas, and then also in rural areas where people may have livestock.”

Stone says that this species thrives in wet conditions, and our wet summer may be why the population is growing. Poison Hemlock is found in ditches and along the sides of roads and paths. She says it can look similar to parsley in its first year, and Queen Anne’s Lace when it flowers in its second year. Dead or alive, from the roots to the seeds, it won’t cause a rash or burn but it can kill you.

“The plant has to be ingested, and that could be through eating parts of the plant, it could be through your nose or eyes,” Stone explains.

It can lead to respiratory failure and Poison Hemlock is rapidly spreading across the country and in Lorain County.

This time of year, you can find either the short herbaceous plants or the tall, hollow stems with small purple splotches. Either way, don’t pull it.

“If it’s individual plants, you can carefully dig it out, trying to get as much of the root system as possible,” explains Stone. “Where you have large expanses of it, a chemical treatment with an herbicide is recommended."

Lorain County Solid Waste

The county has just gone through a website update, the new website for the Solid Waste District is https://loraincountyohio.gov/solidwaste


Please continuously check https://loraincountyohio.gov/solidwaste for updates.

Door-to-Door Energy Solicitors Impersonating NOPEC Employee

There have been several reports of door-to-door solicitors posing as NOPEC employees in several Northeast Ohio communities this Spring. As a reminder, NOPEC NEVER goes door-to-door or calls residents or small businesses to enroll them into your community’s natural gas and/or electric aggregation program. If someone knocks on your door posing as a NOPEC employee during normal business hours, ask for a business card or capture as much information as you can (company name, solicitor’s name, a phone number, copy of any paperwork/brochures they offer you, make, color and license plate number of car, etc.) and call city hall to report them. After normal business hours, call NOPEC’s Customer Care Center at 855-667-3201, 24 hours, 7 days a week to report the encounter. NOPEC will notify your community officials and the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) of this illegal activity. And remember, NEVER share your utility bill or account information with anyone that comes knocking on your door or contacts you are unprompted.

Bulk Pickup Reminder

Rumpke will collect bulky items on your regular service day. You may place bulky items out for collection on one day during each calendar month at no charge. There will be a charge for collection of bulky items on additional days in the same month. Any item placed outside the trash cart will be considered a bulky item. Plastic bags for mattresses and other upholstered furniture can be obtained at the Township Complex on Griswold Road.

The Community Action Agency Programs that may Benefit some Residents

We do not have a program for home repairs. However, Home Energy Assistance Program customers (heating and cooling bill assistance) can get help with minor furnace repairs. We also have federal funding to help with rental assistance. Our Energy Services Department offers utility assistance. Utility assistance includes help with heating bills, cooling bills, and water bills. For seniors only, LCCAA has partnered with the Lorain County Office on Aging to provide utility assistance as walk-in appointments. A staff member is stationed at their Elyria office on the second floor at 320 Gateway Blvd. North in Elyria. An elevator is available. Walk-in hours will be Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Here are the links:

https://www.lccaa.net/programs/energyservices

https://www.lccaa.net/.../energyservices/winter_crisis_2021

https://www.lccaa.net/programs/water_assistance

https://www.lccaa.net/programs/rent_assistance

NOPEC Natural Gas Enrollment Mailers

Existing and newly eligible residents and small businesses in NOPEC member communities will receive natural gas enrollment letters in the mail beginning November 10th. The enrollment period will run through December 13th, 2021, for the contract beginning January 2022 through June 2023.

To help inform your residents about the upcoming natural gas mailing, we have provided informational materials for your use, including FAQs, website copy, and more.

To access this information, visit NOPEC's Member Community Toolkit by clicking this link.

Questions? Contact your NOPEC relationship manager or email team@nopec.org.

Request from the National Weather Service and the Elyria Township Road Department

Please remember leaves should be placed on the tree lawn area & NOT in the street. Piles of leaves on the road make dangerous driving conditions, covering road markings or road hazards. Driving on wet leaves can be like driving on ice.

First Energy Financial Assistance Programs

“The pandemic has increased the financial hardships our customers are facing, particularly as the cold weather approaches,” said Ed Shuttleworth, president of FirstEnergy’s Ohio Operations. “Customers who have lost income during this crisis and who are behind on their utility bills may be eligible for assistance that was unavailable to them before.”


Programs customers may be eligible to participate in include:


• The Percentage of Income Payment Plan (PIPP): Allows customers to pay a set percentage of their income toward their electric bill, regardless of the balance. Customers who maintain their payment plans may be eligible for debt forgiveness. Eligible customers should have income below 150% of federal poverty guidelines. To apply, call 1-800-282-0880 or visit www.energyhelp.ohio.gov.


• Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP): Provides eligible customers with cash grants for home heating bills and emergencies. Customers must have gross income below 175% of federal poverty guidelines. Call the Ohio Development Service Agency at 1-800-282-0880 or visit www.energyhelp.ohio.gov for more information.


• 2-1-1 Helpline: This nationwide resource and information helpline identifies locally available programs that may assist customers with utility bills or other needs. For more information, dial 211, text your ZIP code to 898211 or visit the 211 website.


• Customers who are having difficulty paying utilities, rent or mortgage due to the pandemic may apply for a Home Relief Grant. Visit https://oacaa.org/agency-directory/ for an agency near you.


• Additionally, the $175 Winter Reconnect Option allows residential customers who are disconnected or at risk of disconnection the opportunity to pay a designated amount to have their service restored or maintained. There is no income eligibility requirement. PIPP customers who use this option may be eligible to have a reset of their past due amount.


For a complete list of assistance programs for which customers may be eligible, including installment payment plans and budget billing, please visit www.firstenergycorp.com/billassist, or call customer service:


Ohio Edison 1-800-633-4766


Ohio Edison serves more than one million customers across 34 Ohio counties. Follow Ohio Edison on Twitter @OhioEdison, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OhioEdison, and online at www.ohioedison.com.

The Illuminating Company serves 750,000 customers across Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake and Lorain counties. Connect with The Illuminating Company at www.illuminatingcompany.com, on Twitter @IlluminatingCo and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/IlluminatingCo.


FirstEnergy is dedicated to integrity, safety, reliability and operational excellence. Its 10 electric distribution companies form one of the nation's largest investor-owned electric systems, serving customers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia, Maryland, and New York. The company’s transmission subsidiaries operate approximately 24,000 miles of transmission lines that connect the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions. Follow FirstEnergy online at www.firstenergycorp.com. Follow FirstEnergy on Twitter: @FirstEnergyCorp.

DIY Hacks to Save Electricity (short video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEmRKC9qok0

Elyria Township Vehicle Registration

The proper tax district is 4772. Some residents were being incorrectly charged for the City of Elyria which is $15 more.


Help Residents Quit Tobacco

Because COVID-19 affects the lungs, current smokers might be more motivated to quit.

Direct them to the free Ohio Quitline:

1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669)

Household Sewage Treatment System Operation & Maintenance Program

THE DRUG & OVERDOSE EPIDEMIC IN LORAIN COUNTY

Preservation of the health, safety, and welfare of our county residents is a responsibility we take seriously. Fatal drug overdoses keep rising in Ohio with the Ohio Department of Health recently reporting a 20% increase. The impact is being felt in our community at an alarming rate.

ere in Lorain County (population 306,000), new research estimates 35,000 residents are misusing or abusing opioids*. Last year, 132 overdose deaths occurred. Some of the dead included grandparents. An alarming number of infants are being born displaying withdrawal symptoms due to drug exposure. 75% of our children being placed in foster care in the county is due to parental substance abuse.

Fentanyl is now being mixed with all kinds of street drugs triggering overdoses and death. It is alarming to report that the federal government has assigned two designations to our county because it has become one of the leading drug trafficking counties in the nation. This drug activity is harmful to our families, our children and our local economy ($200-million/year negative economic burden*).

This Public Awareness Report will provide you with the latest information on the severity of the toll the drug epidemic is having on our county. We continue to work with law enforcement and those on the front line. Public Awareness Report