The Institute for Nuclear Theory, a national resource funded by the US Department of Energy and the University of Washington, provides an environment for scientists to advance the frontiers of subatomic physics. Scientific meetings at the INT attract hundreds of visitors annually from around the world to hasten breakthrough discoveries through collaborations.

Current and Upcoming Programs

March 1 - 19, 2021: Topological Phases of Matter: From Low to High Energy (INT-21-1a)

A. Cherman, L. Fidkowski, S. Sen, I. Shovkovy

The study of topological phases of matter has transformed our understanding of phase transitions and brought together insights from different subfields of physics. These phases and associated transitions cannot be described within the standard Landau paradigm of phase transitions involving global symmetries and local order parameters. Read more ...

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Highlights from Recent Programs

October 5 - November 13, 2020: Scientific Quantum Computing and Simulation on Near-Term Devices (20-3)

D. Dean, D. Kaplan, C. Muschik, M.J. Savage

Recent demonstrations of quantum supremacy for specific computational science problems suggest that quantum computing and simulation are on the path to providing quantum advantages for scientific applications. Read more...

November 16 - 20, 2020: Renormalization Group Approaches to the Many-Body Problem (20-78W)

S. Bogner, H. Hergert, R. Stroberg

Modern developments in nuclear theory, condensed matter theory, and quantum chemistry rely on a diverse range of renormalization group (RG) methods. Read more...

January 13 - February 7, 2020: Neutrinos from the Lab to the Cosmos (INT-20-1a)

K. Abazajian, J. Formaggio, C. Lunardini

Neutrinos are weakly interacting particles with strong impacts in nuclear astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics. The workshop explored the impact of neutrino mass and mixing on cosmological observables, including the cosmic expansion rate, the cosmic microwave background, and large scale structure, in particular looking at the standard model of neutrino properties as well as anomalies seen in short baseline experiments. Read more...

August 12 - September 6, 2019: Heavy-Quark Physics and Fundamental Symmetries (INT-19-2b)

A. Bharucha, A. Crivellin, W. Detmold, M. Hoferichter

While the LHC has not directly observed any new particles, in the last years several experiments have found strong indications for New-Physics contributions in semi-leptonic B-meson decays. However, in many cases, the significance of the observation crucially depends on hadronic form factors, with profound consequences for the interpretation of the experimental measurements and their impact on models of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Read more...

September 9 - 13, 2019: Hadronic contributions to (g-2)μ (INT-19-74W)

A. El-Khadra, D. Hertzog, M. Hoferichter

The deviation between measurement and Standard-Model (SM) prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the few current persistent hints for physics beyond the SM. Because the muon g-2 arises from quantum-mechanical loop contributions in the SM, it is sensitive to virtual effects of new particles, and places important constraints on SM extensions. Read more...

In the News

Jens Gundlach, Eric Adelberger, and Blayne Heckel are Co-Winners of the 2021 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for their work on Tabletop Gravity experiments. Read more...


Gordon Baym to Receive 2021 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research.

Theoretical physicist Gordon Baym, Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will receive the 2021 American Physical Society (APS) Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research. Baym will be recognized for his seminal contributions to several fields of physics in early 2021. Read more...


The Muon g-2 Theory Initiative released an extensive review of the Standard Model prediction for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. This community-wide consensus was developed in a series of workshops over the last 3 years, the latest hosted by the INT in September 2019, involving key discussions that led to the recommendations in the white paper. The final value differs from the Brookhaven measurement by 3.7 standard deviations and sets the benchmark for the highly anticipated results from the Fermilab E989 experiment. Read more...

Chris Jarzynski, former INT post-doc, elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Jarzynski is well known for developing an equation to express the second law of thermodynamics for systems at the molecular scale while he was a post-doc at the INT. The equation is known as the Jarzynski equality. Published in the journal Physical Review Letters in 1997, the paper that introduced his equation has been cited in scientific literature more than 4,000 times. Read more...

Margaret Burbidge, giant in astronomy, dies at age 100.

In 1957 Margaret Burbidge coauthered with Geoffrey Burbidge, Fred Hoyle and Willy Fowler the seminal paper “The Synthesis of the Elements in Stars” which created the road map followed to this day for understanding nucleosynthesis in stars. Read more...

U.S. Department of Energy Selects Brookhaven National Laboratory to Host Major New Nuclear Physics Facility

January 9, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the selection of Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY, as the site for a planned major new nuclear physics research facility.

The Electron Ion Collider (EIC), to be designed and constructed over ten years at an estimated cost between $1.6 and $2.6 billion, will smash electrons into protons and heavier atomic nuclei in an effort to penetrate the mysteries of the “strong force” that binds the atomic nucleus together. Read more...

The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science (QIS) released its report in early November, Nuclear Physics and Quantum Information Science. David Hertzog, who leads UW’s Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics (CENPA) is the Chair of NSAC, and the National Institute for Nuclear Theory’s (INT) and UW's Martin Savage is Chair of the QIS Subcommittee.

Among the experimental, theoretical and computational nuclear physics research activities, the report identifies capabilities and expertise unique to nuclear physics that will advance QIS. Similarly, it identifies nuclear physics scientific objectives and grand challenges expected to benefit from present and future developments in QIS. The work of the nuclear physics community in these areas can support strongly, and on strategic timescales, a national program established by the National Quantum Initiative.