Dr. Sarah Null

Aquatic Habitat, Climate, and Water Analysis (ACWA) Lab

Opportunities

Prospective students with an interest in quantitative aspects of water resource management, watershed sciences modeling, and/or climate change impacts on water resources (and promising adaptations) are encouraged to contact me to discuss graduate research opportunities. Funding is often available for students with good quantitative analysis and computer skills (programming and modeling) and funding opportunities are posted below when available. Prospective students should send inquiries via email and include a 1 page statement of research interests, CV, GRE scores, GPA, and reference contact information. Graduate students may receive degrees through the Department of Watershed Sciences, Civil and Environmental Engineering, or the Ecology Center.

If you are not responding to an advertised position, I may be willing to work with you to secure funding if you have identified a research project that coincides with my research interests and/or prospective funding sources. Promising funding sources include: EPA STAR Fellowships for graduate study, NSF Graduate Fellowship Research Program, or Quinney College of Natural Resources Doctoral Fellowships.

Undergraduate students are also encouraged to contact me about research and technician openings in my lab. Opportunities for undergraduate research in my lab include honors theses, work study, and funding opportunities such as undergraduate research fellowships through iUTAH or the Quinney College of Natural Resources.

Join the Lab - doctoral graduate research

I am currently seeking motivated and independent doctoral students interested in incorporating environmental objectives into water resources systems models. Research tasks include:

1) sampling aquatic habitat (streamflow, stream temperatures, terrain and geomorphic condition...) using sensors and drones,

2) comparing the accuracy of aquatic habitat condition using measured data and remotely-sensed data,

3) developing water resources systems models for Utah rivers that include human and environmental water objectives, and

4) using robust decision-making to quantify how much uncertainty in aquatic habitat representation ins tolerated in systems models before water management decisions change.

Desired qualifications of potential doctoral students include experience with or willingness to learn: field sampling, GIS and spatial database management, water resources modeling (simulation and/or optimization), programming ability (R, python, GAMS, or other languages), ability to publish in peer-reviewed journals, strong oral and written communication skills, and interest in working in dynamic, interdisciplinary research teams.

Prospective students should send inquiries via email and include a 1 page statement of research interests, CV, GRE scores, GPA, TOEFL (international students), and reference contact information. Graduate students may receive degrees through the Department of Watershed Sciences, Civil and Environmental Engineering, or the Ecology Center.