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Mar 1, 2015

MARCH 1, 2015 ANNOUNCEMENT

Hello yet again readers. This is my third monthly announcement, for March 2015, about plans for this site, particularly those for section 3.

To start off, I've finished section 1, and I'm almost finished with section 2. There are three things left for that section:

- article on extensions to Conway chain arrows (almost complete)
- improve the article on googological prefixes and suffixes
- review article for section 2

Now I'd like to elaborate more on the second one. In general I plan on making that article more detailed, as the level of detail I go into in my site's articles has greatly increased since I made that page in October 2014. But also I'd like to change up something with the googo- and googolple- subarticle: I plan on moving general discussion of the prefixes to the prefixes and suffixes article, but I also feel that parts 2 and 3 of the googo- and googolple- article don't really belong with all my other content. I would delete them, but since I did some pretty hard work on them, I won't delete them. Instead I'll archive them on my blog "Cookie Fonster's stuff".

After finishing up section 2, I'll dissolve the "My Own Googology" section as discussed in last month's announcement (perhaps archive some of its pages on my blog?), and then work on section 3 - I'm pretty confident all this will happen this month. And that brings us to the second part of this announcement, plans for section 3.

Section 3 of this site will be much longer than sections 1 and 2. In fact I plan on dividing it into three sub-sections:

3.1 - large number notations up to w^w in the fast-growing hierarchy (e.g. Bowers' linear arrays) - in that section I'll have articles on notations around that range, then in the last article compare them against each other.

3.2 - large number notations of order w^w to epsilon-zero in the fast-growing hierarchy (e.g. Bowers' dimensional and tetrational arrays) - as above.

3.3 - fast-growing sequences around that range, like Friedman's n(k) sequence or Goodstein sequences.

Now that last section is of particular note because the topic of fast-growing sequences is often underappreciated among googologists - admittedly I myself don't have very much familiarity with them as of this writing. Writing that section will remedy that, and my goal is to give readers a full understanding of each of those sequences and how they get to grow so quickly.

So stay tuned for all these updates discussed above!

- Cookie Fonster
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