A Brief Introduction to the History of Forest Grove, BC

The objective of this history is to bring together as much biographical material as possible relating to families or individuals that settled in the Forest Grove area between 1910 and 1950. This has proven to be a more daunting task than originally anticipated. In some cases, only names could be identified but there was little if any supporting information. In other cases, it was relatively easy to bring together a great deal of information. The Forest Grove reunion held in August of 2007 brought forth some material and this was very helpful.

In 1977 the 100 Mile Historical Society carried out a number of interviews as a Canadian Centennial Project. These were recorded on cassette tapes and given to the British Columbia Archives for safekeeping. Many hours were spent this past winter in the Archives transcribing the information on these tapes into rough biographical sketches. The tapes are deteriorating and some are already in such poor shape that they are almost useless but, for all that, they contained a wealth of local history that would otherwise unobtainable. The 100 Mile Free Press has over the years published articles on local residents and some of this was also of assistance.

Where now? This material needs to be looked by people who knew these individuals and families and annotated. Other names need to be suggested and some biographical information recorded. Names which come to mind where there is nothing available include; Gordon Graham, The Sellars (Dick and Earl), George Rhodes, Jack Cook, Ray Devore, Ron Riley, Dick Felker, Ted Naden and a great many others. Corrections also need to be made where there are errors of fact. There is, of course, no end to this type of research but at some point it will be necessary to draw a line on it and edit it down to a manageable size so that it can be presented in a standardized format.

Note: To enlarge any image select and left click.

Robert W. White

April 2009

Note: As of 4 January 2012 these materials have been published in a book by LULU Press. Contact either Phil Wilcox or Robert White if you have an interest in obtaining a copy of this book. Se email addresses at the bottom of this page.



 
 

History of Forest Grove

Originally written by Ulva Jean Phillips Edgar in April of 1987

Edited by Robert W. White in April of 2009

 

In June of 1910 the Phillips family moved from Madras, Oregon to Edmonton, Alberta where Arthur St. Claire Phillips purchased a section of farmland 12 miles north of Edmonton and raised 1 crop of grain. He sold out the following year and moved to Ashcroft, B.C where he purchased livery stables. This was anticipated to be a profitable enterprise as all freight going north of Ashcroft was hauled by freight teams and wagons. In 1911 Arthur Phillips became seriously ill and was sent to Kamloops Hospital where he died. He was buried in Kamloops beside his oldest daughter, Maude Pinkham Phillips.

Following the death of her husband Mary Alice Phillips continued to operate the stables until 1915 at which time a fire wiped out much of the town of Ashcroft including the Phillips home, stables and all of their effects. After this loss Mary Alice Phillips and her family moved to the Cariboo where her son, Oliver Arthur Phillips, had taken up a homestead of 160 acres on lot 2936. The family named their new home Forest Grove after a town by the same name in Oregon.

The land included in the original Forest Grove homestead included the following lots – 2936 - which later sold or passed to Frederick Armatage Maude when Oliver Phillips failed to prove up. This was a considerable shame as he had already constructed one of the largest barns in the country the remains of which can still be seen today. In addition the following lots - 2940, 2938 and 2947 were all listed under the name of Mary Alice Phillips although it is not known if the grants were proved. Lot 2939 was located under the name of Mary Alice (Phillips) Maude and was located in close proximity to lot 2936 and is today a large field on the left hand side of the road just beyond the community hall. This lot was still part of the holding in 1945 so it can be assumed that it was properly improved.

Marie Phillips, who was married to Jack Lloyd of 100 Mile House, applied for lot 2933 located next to Indian Reservation No. 1 not far from Canim Lake. Lot 2959 was in the name of Laura (Neil) Phillips and Ida (Bedingfield) Phillips applied for lot 4660 near the lake which is today called Bedingfield.

By 1917 Forest Grove consisted of a lodge, general store, post office, billiard hall, trading post, a large barn as well as a storage building. Two small housekeeping cabins made of logs were later built probably by George Borthwick[1], Lillian Arna Phillips Ash first husband, although it has been suggested that Hector Borthwick may have assisted him. On 12 May 1917 Oliver Arthur Phillips married Eva Mae Doyle in Vancouver, B.C. and gave up his homestead to Fred Maude. It is said that Maude was a neighbor who learned that Oliver had not proven up on his homestead and through legal action took possession. It is, perhaps, ironic that Fred Maude later married Oliver Phillip’s mother, Mary Alice Phillips, on October 11, 1919. The business at Forest Grove was renamed the F.A. Maude, General Merchant Store and Trading Post. The only additional structure that was completed in the years that followed was a wood frame kitchen which was added to the main log lodge in 1928. This addition was torn down and replaced in 1946 by Bob Parkin and Archer White.

 In June of 1924, Eclus Phillips, another son of Mary Alice, married Mable Nelson of Whonnock, B.C. It is assumed that Eclus or Ec, as he was called, did not return to Forest Grove until about 1938 after logging for some years in the Fraser Valley and on Vancouver Island. Following the death of his mother in California in 1938- and the declining health of Fred Maude - Eclus Phillips purchased the Forest Grove complex from his stepfather and renamed it E.C. Phillips General Merchant. In 1940 when Oliver Phillips’ wife, Eva Mae and his sister Ulva Jean Phillips visited Eclus and Mable she recalled seeing “some Indians –men, women and children- with dogs, horses and cattle arrive at the store with a drawn travois loaded with trading goods.”

In the fall of 1945 Ec Phillips sold the Forest Grove lodge and business to Archer White and Bob Parkin both of West Vancouver. A year later Madelene and Bob Parkin and Archer and Priscilla White built a second 5—room log house as a sleeping cabin for both families. A kitchen was added at a later date.  This building is still standing as are the two small log cabins built by George Borthwick.

In the winter of 1950, the store and billiard hall were destroyed by fire, (See article in the Williams Lake Tribune for Thursday, December 29, 1977.)

In 1957 Forest Grove Lodge was sold to Jack and Carol Shaw who came from the lower Mainland where Jack was a woodworking instructor at the "Young Offenders Unit” in Oakalla. Carol Shaw was a reporter for the Vancouver Sun. Jack became the Steward of the Forest Grove Legion Branch #261 where he was a charter member. Carol founded the first newspaper in 100 Mile House, The 100 Mile Herald, a division of the Cariboo Press, which also published The Williams Lake Tribune.

On September 9, 1965 — the two story log house known as the Forest Grove lodge burned to the ground.  (see article in The Williams Lake Tribune, December 29, 1977.) The lodge was rebuilt by the Shaws on the original site and was sold to the Dahl family in 1970.

With increased traffic using the road to Canim Lake more development began to take place where the Canim-Hendrix Road joined Eagle Creek Road. This junction now marks the commercial center of the town of Forest Grove and is located about a quarter mile south of the original Forest Grove lodge.

This town is now known as Forest Grove. In the general area there is a school, store, legion, community hall and post office.

 


[1] George Borthwick later returned to the coast but maintained a “rustic” cabin on Oie Lake. His brother Hector Borthwick who also lived on Oie Lake was a frequent visitor to Forest Grove in the years after 1945.

 

Name of Office:

Forest Grove

Federal Electoral District:

Cariboo / Coast Chilcotin / Kamloops (British Columbia)

Dates:

Establishment Re-openings

Closings

1917-08-01

-

Postmaster Information:

Name of Postmaster

Military Status

Date of Birth

Date of Appointment

Date of Vacancy

Cause of Vacancy

Mrs. Mary A. Phillips Maude

-

-

1917-08-01

1938-04-05

Death

Mrs. Mabel Phillips

-

*

1938-04-06

Acting

-

Mrs. Mabel Phillips

-

*

1938-08-03

1945-09-24

Resignation

Mrs. Priscilla Anne White

-

*

1945-10-03

Acting

-

Mrs. Priscilla Anne White

-

*

1946-08-15

1951-08-15

Resignation

Mrs. Ruth Maxime Sellars

-

*

1951-08-15

Acting

-

Mrs. Ruth Maxime Sellars

-

*

1951-10-29

1953-07-20

Resignation

Miss Ina Evelyn Carlson

-

*

1953-07-15

Acting

-

Miss Ina Evelyn Carlson

-

*

1953-10-28

1954-08-16

Resignation

William Richard Felker

-

*

1954-08-17

Acting

-

William Richard Felker

-

*

1954-11-23

1956-01-13

Resignation

Mrs. Grace Louise Aldred

-

*

1956-01-13

Acting

-

Mrs. Grace Alfred

-

*

1956-01-13

-

-

Mrs. Grace Louise Aldred

-

*

1956-05-16

1972-12-01

Resignation

Peter Friedrick Wolfgang Haber

-

*

1972-12-01

1974-02-09

Resignation

Mrs. Barbara Jean Haber

-

*

1974-02-09

1974-08-19

Acting PM, office transferred

Robert Edward Scaife

-

*

1974-08-19

1974-12-01

Resigned

Barrie Baker Taylor

-

*

1974-12-01

-




FIRST TRIP THE P.G.& E. (1916) made to Clinton B.C.

Memoirs of Eva May Doyle

A TRIP INTO THE NEW WORLD

May 15, 1916: Left North Vancouver the morning of May 15/16 and caught the Ballena at 9:15 for Squamish. Had a lovely trip ... the weather was grand. We had dinner on the boat which we did justice to. Caught the train for Clinton at 10:00. We had a very slow trip. The train went off the track going around Anderson Lake. Had supper at D'Arcy and had a regular wild west feed.

After we left Lillooet, the train followed the Fraser River. The scenery was simply grand. We seemed to be hundreds of feet above the river and followed the mountain on a ledge only wide enough to carry the train. Before we arrived in Clinton, the train stopped many times for little slides had blocked the way. Turning a corner, the steps on the coach we were in were ripped off.

We arrived in Clinton 2:30 a.m., tired to death and the hotel a long way from the station. The conductor told us when we left the train, to follow the track until we came to the road and turn to our right, which we did and we went a mile in the opposite way from the hotel. There were two small children, four women, two girls beside myself and two men in the party. We were a pretty tired and discouraged crowd when we found out that we were all but lost. We turned around and tried the other direction and at last struck the hotel only to find the hotel filled to overflowing. This nearly clapped the climax. We were all disgusted with everything in general, country included. The man that owned the hotel was very indifferent about putting us up. He couldn't put us out, so he gave us the sitting room to sit up in. Anything looked good to us. We were so tired. Some slept on the floor, others on chairs and some in rockers.

 May 1916: Morning came after hours of waiting and with morning breakfast which was enough to sicken even the strongest person. After our hearty breakfast, we made ready to take the auto to our pre-emp. After a little trouble, we at last got started, loaded with baggage to the eyes. The trip through the country was equally as lovely as the trip by train only of a different kind. We passed several caravans on our way, also autos carrying people. We stopped for dinner at the 83 mile house and ate everything in sight ... everything was so good.

We did not stop again until we came to the 100 mile house where we met [Jack] Lloyd who made arrangements to have our things taken in to the cabin and he also promised to come and see us. We arrived o.k. only to find no windows in the place; mattresses, pillows and a box of things burnt. By now we were indeed blue and worst of all, no-well dug.

After some hurrying around, Oliver Phillips brought hay, pillows, 2 blankets for us so after a good night's rest, we looked at the world in a very much brighter light.

May 17: First thing we did was to open boxes and straighten things up a bit. Before the morning was over, Mr. Williamson and his brother-in  law came in and put up shelves and cupboards for us. From this on, things went just fine. We spent the rest of the day getting acquainted with the country and the people

May 18: Had breakfast. Cleaned the house. We made a big bonfire. Did some cleaning up around the outside of the house. Carried enough water to do the day from Mr. Caspars and some from Jack Williamson. Had dinner, carried in wood. Made window curtains. In the evening, Oliver Phillips took us in a democrat to Mr. Mathews. Came home singing at the top of our lungs, After that, played cards, told fortunes, etc.

May 19: Some more cleaning both inside and out. We went to Mrs. Jack Williamson's about a mile away and carried two pails of drinking water and bought our first dozen eggs. We met an Indian and a spare horse on the way, also a dead dog which was frozen in the winter. In the evening, four boys came up to see us.

May 20: Had our garden plowed and made ready for seed. Jessie Phillips and I rode on the disk and had a great time (this is the life). After dinner we helped make bonfires and cleaned up in general. That evening, we spent alone for the first time and hung curtains.

May 21: Slept in late. Had breakfast; got cleaned up and had lunch. After we had a read, took a walk around our place, picked violets and saw several rats nests and we also took some pictures. We wrote some letters bout 3:00,0liver Phillips and his brother took Mother, Jessie, Rita and I to Canim Lake. On the way we were caught in a rain and hail storm. After we were soaked, it cleared up and we had a lovely return trip. In the evening, we all walked down to Mrs. Phillips' and spent the evening, also walked back.

May 22: Jessie and Rita went for the milk. I washed dishes, swept and made a cake and also carried water. Spent the afternoon lazy because we are going to have a wild time this evening at Mrs. Elliots, four miles down the road. Oliver Phillips took mother up to Mrs. Arthur Williamson's in a rig this afternoon.

May 23: Didn't get home until 3:30 a.m., all tired to death. Mrs. Wilcox  stayed all night. We three girls slept in one bed. About noon, Jessie took terribly sick and was sick the rest of the day. Harry Wilcox and Oliver Phillips were up before dinner. Harry took his mother home while Oliver Phillips stayed for dinner. In the afternoon, we looked around and after supper went to bed early.

May 24: Did a big washing. Had rest in afternoon. Did a lot of clearing and burning in evening.

May 25: Did ironing. Jessie and Rita went for milk. We carried water.  Mrs. A. Williamson came on horseback to see us in the afternoon. In the evening, planted flower seeds and did some more burning.

May 26: Carried water. Marie, Jessie and I walked to Mrs. A. Williamson's. Stayed for supper, went to Silver Lake (2 miles return). Came home taking turns riding Mr. Williamson's horse. Changed our shoes and walked home with Marie (2 miles return). Slept at night like logs.

May 27: Got up late. Did our cooking. Went for milk; carried water; had lunch and a bath. Planted spuds, peas and beans; hung netting on windows and washed them; made curtains for bedroom.

May 28: Spent a very quiet day: got up late; lounged around; read and wrote letters. Had company in the evening.

May 29: Carried water for washing tomorrow. Got milk; did cleaning; had three large bonfires and burnt up a lot of branches and chips. Had a rest in the afternoon. Mr.& Mrs. A Williamson came to see us and caught us asleep. Had a great talk and they left just before supper. After supper, Oliver and his brother came bringing eight lovely rainbow trout which certainly looked good to us. We also had some bear meat sent to us by a man we have never met. This must be our lucky day.

May 30: Did a big washing. Got two cakes cooked. In the evening, fourteen people came and we set off seven huge bonfires; played games; sang and danced. We all had a ripping time. They didn't leave until 2:30 a.m. Before they left, it started to rain.

 May 31: Slept in until 10:00 a.m. when we heard someone call our names. It turned out to be 0. Phillips. He had come to see if we had been soaked during the night. But as it happened we were o.k. and we all hurried and dressed. While we were dressing, he carried two big pails of water and stayed for breakfast and we all talked till about l:00 p.m. when the rain came down (also hail) almost like a cloudburst. Then our roof started to leak and before we were through, the rain came through the roof as if it were a sieve and there wasn't an inch in the house the rain did not soak.

We were fortunate enough to have a canvas to cover our beds which kept them dry. This has certainly been a day of days. But, before evening we managed to get everything dry which wasn't so bad. Everybody slept without rocking that night.

June 1: Got up about 9:00 a.m.; carried water; went for milk; cleaned the house; made beds and ironed. Had dinner; cleaned up; took a walk over some property near the house; picked flowers and returned to the house had something to eat and did some sewing. Some Indians came up and had a little talk with us and then went away.

June 2 to 5: Same old routine as before; more cleaning and burning; 3 bonfires and several rats’ nests. We were to Mrs. Mathews on the 4th; came home and had supper at Mrs. Phillips' and had a lovely ride home. Monday, the 5th, we left home in the morning for the 105 mile house. Day was grand. We took two rigs ... one broke down twice before we got to the 100 Mile House. Stayed there for dinner ... were guests of Mr. [Jack]Lloyd. We had a great time. Quite a lot of excitement there for the P.G.E. have started to advance their line ... expect to be at the 100 Mile by fall.

We left the 100 mile for the 105 ... had supper at the Provincial Experimental Farm and left for home about 8:00 bringing back two heavy horses and two colts. We had a slow trip home but a lovely one for the country we came through was grand. Arrived home 5 to 12:00 p.m.

June 5: Oliver came before we were up and he and Mr. Caspar carried enough water for our washing. The day was too wet to wash. We lounged around the rest of the day.

June 6 to 21: Had a trip to Mr. A. Williamson's on horseback. We went through my property going and come through a new trail coming home. This was my first ride of the season and I certainly enjoyed every moment of it. Coming home, we climbed a very steep hill. When on the top, we seemed to be on a level with the surrounding mountains. The view from that point was grand. We had dinner at Mrs. A. Williamson's and supper at Mrs. Mathews and came home for a minute and then on to Phillips' where we left the horses and then walked home. Next morning I felt great, not a bit stiff.

Rita had a lovely ride with Mr. Lloyd. On the 13th, Rita, Jessie and Marie went to Canim Lake for the mail (16 miles return). They had a lovely time.

When they were away, I went hunting duck nests with Oliver Phillips and found a lovely one with nine eggs in it in a swamp on our place. When the girls came home, Mr. A. Williamson was waiting for his mail. About the 15th, Mrs. Phillips gave us five lovely little wild ducks, but they didn't live they were too young. On the 17th, Oliver and I went to see his sister, Ida, 13 miles or more from his place. The day was dreadfully hot, but we eventually got there. We did some fishing and I caught about 3 dozen rainbow trout. We didn't get home until Monday morning because we had a rainstorm and all the brush was as wet and I only had a thin silk sweater with me. During the night, the wind blew the moisture from the trees, so on Monday morning, we left even if it did look as if we were going to have another shower. On our way home, we stayed off at Mrs. A. Williamson's for a little while to dry off and we also left her some fish which she was delighted to have about l: 00 p.m.We left there for home. We were too busy talking when we came home to eat.

June 21: Mrs. Phillips gave a big bonfire party for Jessie and Eclus  for it was their birthday. We had all kinds of fun and we didn't get home till after one.

June 22: Jessie's birthday we gave her a good beating to start the day and one to finish. The day was horrid for it rained nearly all day. When we went for the milk, we had a terrible time for the roads were nothing but mush to the ankles.

June 23: We weeded the garden; burnt more brush and made ourselves useful, generally. Oliver came down and cut wood. We all stood around and kept him company, by talking to him, setting wood was a hardship for us so this help was very much appreciated.

June 24: Did our big ironing early so we had the rest of the day to do as we liked and that usually went to reading or fancy work. Rita went with Oliver for a ride but a shower came up and they had to return home.


Contacts: If there is anything in these pages that requires correction or if you wish to make a contribution send a note to either Phil Wilcox or Robert White as indicated below.

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