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  •  Who    Created by Jack Bellis. Edited by anyone in the world.
  •  What   A publicly-edited, hierarchical dictionary of the English language.
    • It's not precisely 'words' but rather, concepts. (Thus the 'coept' in the URL. 'Lexonomy' as a dot-com URL was taken so started using the term 'coeptonomy.') Anyway, when different parts of speech for the same concept exist (to paint, paint) this dictionary can really have just one data point. I figure that in the human brain, 'paint' is a single thread of some sort with various knots on it marking, among other things the various parts of speech pertinent to it. This dictionary doesn't need to repeatedly declare every part of speech.
  •  Where   Right where you are. On Google 'Sites' until it proves unworthy.
    • I've tried Wave but it choked horribly on the length of raw concept lists, and wasn't public. Might try again. (Wave is a brilliant concept, breaking the walls between mail and wiki, but it will be ready when our kids are ready for it.)
    • My first attempt was my own custom site with a Flash plugin to show a drag-and-drop tree control but it was not robust enough.
    • Google Sites seems worthy; the Raw Data Pages are slow, but they're only for harvesting term topics NOT FOR ONGOING EDITING.
  •  Why     Mostly "because it's there" or rather, isn't yet. And as advertising of my other work.
    • When doing crossword puzzles I noticed that words have distinct broader-narrower relationships, and there's no dictionary organized that way.
    • Also from crossword puzzles, I theorize that any word can be defined by as few as two other words (Bellis's First Law of Lexonomy). Prove me wrong.
  •  How    
    • Editing an Existing "Lexonomy Page"
      • Open a page from the "Lexonomy Pages" section on the left and click Edit Page.
      • You are the editor. Work on any page.
      • Indent terms that are clearly narrower
      • For the initial phase of the work, let's all start off simple and set your sites low. Just indent terms that are not fundamental so that only the broadest terms remain at the top LEVEL of the list. Ask yourself if a child would learn that word first... or if it can't be reduced to simpler words. If so, it should be "at the root"; I call them Prime Words, like prime numbers, eh?
      • Don't get overly caught up in perfect tree structure (subordination, hierarchy); that will be the goal but it's easy to get horribly bogged down and discouraged.
      • Eventually we'll organize the prime words more carefully but for now let's not worry about it.
      • If you see a good parent-child relationship to arrange, move the words around. Minimize copying.
      • Copying Words
        • Since this is a catalog of concepts rather than words,  two different meanings of a single word might be two very different locations in the tree, but in general, minimize copying. (In case you're not aware, copying in general is the root of 80% of all computer problems, from spam to email overload to spaghetti code.)
        • Different parts of speech are not different 'meanings'... just different purposes in speech.
      • Delete Junk
        • Delete alternate parts of speech or conjugation.
        • Delete phrases and other gibberish in Thoreau's original that aren't distinct concepts. But note that phrases, to the extent that they are distinct concepts, still could have a place in Lexonomy. But be aggressive deleting Thoreau's old stuff. I want this thing done before Google is bought by Samsung; manufacturers aren't so keen on free wikis.
      • On the left are our first topic pages. Go for it.
    • Creating a New Lexonomy Term Page
      • If you're really ambitious, you could create a new page.
      • There are Raw Data Pages on the left for concept groups copied from a public domain copy of Roget's Thesaurus. The entire 900 topics are in the raw data as of February 1, 2011.
      • Look for a numbered term you like in the raw data pages... one you think you could structure a little. Example, #7 State in "003-019." I already moved 'State' to its own page, so all you'll see is its old heading.
      • With the raw data page open, click Edit Page.
      • MOVE text out of any of the raw data page:
        • Cut it from the raw data page into your clipboard, LEAVING its big, bold, numbered heading so it's clear later what's been done.
        • Save the shortened raw data page.
        • Click the Create Page button. Name it for the term on the clipboard.
        • Paste the clipboard text into the new page that you create for a single concept term.
        • Folder your new page under "Lexonomy Pages."
    • Tracking Progress
      • In the Comments section of the page describe the state you left the page in, such as "First pass, really needs work."
    • Legalese, etc.
      • Please be aware that I do claim ownership of the result but I'll be happy to acknowledge all contributors if there ends up being a commercial use. You'd need to tell me who you are, then, wouldn't you.
      • Tell friends to edit it.
—Thanks, Jack Bellis, November, 2010 (Revised February 12, 2011)



 

 
 




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