Gather Up Your Brokenness:

Love, Imperfection and Human Ideals


A lecture by Polly Young-Eisendrath of
 Worcester, Vermont

Friday
, Feb. 19
 
7:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m
The John Molson School of Business
Room MB 3.210
1450 rue Guy (Metro Guy/Concordia)
Members $12
Non-Members $15
Students/Senior Members $8
                     



    In the poetic tradition of Zen monk and bard, Leonard Cohen, this presentation celebrates our brokenness. Often, we hear about grieving our mistakes, failures, losses and imperfections, but rarely do we learn how to mine them for their richness. Because human beings are naturally broken—with personalities that are largely unconscious, reactive and hard to manage—we have countless opportunities in our relationships and work to see our selves in the cracks of the 

     mirror.



“The Present Heart:”

Love, Loss and Discovery

A workshop with Polly Young-Eisendrath

And OPQ accredited training seminar


Saturday
, Feb. 20
10:00 a.m-4:30 p.m.
The John Molson School of Business
Room MB 3.435
1450 rue Guy 
(Metro Guy/Concordia)
Members $70
Non-Members $90
Students/Senior Members $50
($50 for OPQ Credits)
OPQ# RA01451-15

Love always guarantees a broken heart. No matter how else it functions in our lives, love will include loss, separation or betrayal. From my personal tragedy of my husband’s early onset Alzheimer’s—and his death after a decade of reversal of his emotional and cognitive maturity—I have closely examined both Western psychological and Buddhist approaches to love and loss.
      In this workshop, I will answer the question, “What is love, anyway?” In the process, I will talk about desire, romance, harmful idealizations and enmeshments with our partners, children, parents and friends. We will talk about loss in the context of the Buddha’s teachings about reality. This workshop presents a new context for personal love as a spiritual practice of deep acceptance of the human condition.

    Polly Young-Eisendrath is a psychologist, writer, speaker and Jungian 

analyst who has published fifteen books. Her most recent book, The Present Heart: 

A Memoir of Love, Loss and Discovery,

 is a meditation on the healing power of love—based on her experience with her spouse who died from early onset Alzheimer’s disease—that attempts to answer the question “What is love, 

anyway?”