Living More Fully in the Shadow of Mortality

A Lecture by James Hollis of Washington, D.C.


Friday, March 17
7:30-10:00 p.m.
The John Molson School of Business
1450 rue Guy
(Metro Guy/Concordia)
Room MB1.210
Members $20, Non-Members $25
Students/Senior Members $15


 


Jung observed that “life is a short pause between two mysteries.” 

That fact is not in debate; what does matter, then, is how we live 

that short pause. Given that mortality frames our brief journey, 

how can we live more fully in its presence without being defined 

by morbidity, fear, and denial? What are the attitudes and 

practices that enable us to live more fully? And what 

psychological maturation brings us to experience this short pause 

as rich with meaning?
 



Living More Fully in the Shadow of Mortality:

Taking Your Life Back

A day-long training seminar with James Hollis

*With 5 CE Credits

This event is also open to the public.

Saturday, March 18
10:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
The John Molson School of Business
1450 rue Guy (Metro Guy/Concordia)
Room MB3.435
Members $80, Non-Members $100
Students/Senior Members $60
*PLUS $50 for 5 CE Credits

OPQ number (RA01948-17)

Jung observed that “life is a short pause between two mysteries.” That fact is not in debate; what does matter, then, is how we live that short pause. 
     Tiny, dependent, and at the mercy of the world around us, we all have to adapt, adjust, bury, deny, split-off and repress, and thereby lose contact with our own sovereignty and natural source of guidance. 
     Fears of aging and dying may underlie clinical presentations of anxiety and depression in ways that our clients do not consciously recognize and have difficulty thinking and speaking about. Both therapist and client may also be affected by cultural attitudes that impede mature reflection. Given that mortality frames each life, how can we live fully in its presence without being hampered by morbidity and denial? This seminar will consider what attitudes and practices can enable clients and therapists to live more fully while recognizing their mortality, to experience this "short pause" as rich with meaning.
     This program/workshop will focus on twenty-one steps we may take during the second half of life toward the recovery of our personal journey.  
   
James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst in practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is also the author of fourteen books translated into nineteen languages and the forthcoming Taking Back Your Life.

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It is with great shock and sadness that that we learned of the death of our dear friend Guy Corneau.

   

    May his friends and family know that he will be sorely missed by members of our Montreal Jung Society and that we share their grief at this time. 


     His joyous nature will be long remembered.

     James Hollis has offered the following poem: 



William (Johnson) Cory. 1823–1892
  
 Heraclitus
  
THEY told me, Heraclitus, they told me you were dead, 
They brought me bitter news to hear and bitter tears to shed. 
I wept as I remember'd how often you and I 
Had tired the sun with talking and sent him down the sky. 
 
And now that thou art lying, my dear old Carian guest,         
A handful of grey ashes, long, long ago at rest, 
Still are thy pleasant voices, thy nightingales, awake; 
For Death, he taketh all away, but them he cannot take.