.45 inch Martini Henry Solid Case Carbine

Once the Solid Case Rifle cartridge had been approved in 1885 a similar round was introduced for the carbine.

Carbine Solid Case Mark I

"Cartridge S.A. Ball Martini Henry Carbine Solid Case Mark I" was approved in December 1886 and shown in LoC Paragraph 5159 dated March 1887.

The case was similar to the Rifle Solid Case Mark II but differed in not having a neck cannelure and the paper lining was thifker to reflect the smaller powder charge.

The bullet was an alloy of 12 parts lead to 1 part tin without cannelure and weighed 410 grains. It had a red paper patch with a similar arrangement of wads as the rifle round.

The propellant charge was about 85 grains of RFG2 blackpowder.

Cases were headstamped with contractors initials and usually with the numeral "I". Some have simply the word "CARBINE" and these are believed to have been supplied to the Royal Irish Constabulary. Like the rifle round, apart from the trial batches produced at Woolwich all cases were made by the trade including Kynoch, Birmingham Small Arms & Metal Company (and their successor Birmingham Metals & Munitions Co.) and Grenfell & Accles.

Left: Mark I carbine headstamped "CARBINE" for Royal Irish Constabulary.



Sealed Pattern for Carbine Solid Case Mark I courtesy of National Firearms Centre, Leeds.

Carbine Solid Case Cordite Mark I

After the approval of the Cordite loaded rifle cartrisge in 1902 a similar round for the carbine was approved the followin year.

"Cartridge S.A. Ball Martini Henry Carbine Solid Case Cordite Mark I" was approved in March 1903 and shown in LoC Paragraph 1172 dated August 1903.

The case was as the Rifle Solid Case Mark II with Berdan primer with 0.7 grains of cap composition. it had one neck cannelure and included the Numeral "I" and the letter "C" for Cordite.

The bullet was similar to the previous mark but had a green paper patch. There was one waxed millboard wad between the bullet and the charge.

The propellant charge was about 34 grains of Cordite size 3.

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