Indigenous Resources

While the OPTA website is under construction, some resources may be temporarily unavailable.

Please email ontariophilosophy@gmail.com if there is something specific you are looking for and we will find it for you.

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSION OF CANADA: CALLS TO ACTION (2015)

http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf


The Ministry of Education of Ontario has mandated a curriculum revision ('refresh' in their terminology) in all subjects, Kindergarten to grade 12, in accordance with the recommendations in the TRC: Calls to Action document. The implementation of the revised curricula will be phased in over a period of years beginning with the primary grades in September 2018. Two of the recommendations that will be of interest to high school philosophy teachers are:

  • Education, page 2

    • - 10, iii - Developing culturally appropriate curricula


  • Education for Conciliation, page 7

    • - 63, iii - Building student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy and mutual respect.


OPTA already has relevant classroom resources posted.


First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Connections, Scope and Sequence of Expectations (2016)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/SecondaryFNMI.pdf

Art, Philosophy and Religion begins on page 165.


First Nations, Métis & Inuit Education Association of Ontario

https://fnmieao.com


INDIGENOUS PHILOSOPHY

OPTA has initiated a project that will incorporate First Nations, Inuit, and Métis philosophies and pedagogies into the current philosophy curriculum. The aims of this project are to provide more diverse resources to Ontario philosophy classrooms, and to compensate for the lack of Indigenous cultures, histories, and perspectives represented in secondary education.


The following lessons have been made in collaboration with the Department of Aboriginal Education at University of Toronto's OISE. Many thanks to Professor Jean-Paul Restoule and Angela Nardozi for their constructive feedback and constant support. The ethics lesson was also done in partnership with First Nations Elder Cat Criger, a traditional teacher of the Cayuga (Guyohkohnyoh) Turtle Clan. We thank Cat for sharing his knowledge, and for making himself available as a guest speaker for teachers interested in implementing this lesson. Further thanks to Elder Ernie Sandy, Ojibway scholar and teacher at Nipissing and York Universities, and an elder in residence at Dodem Kanonhsa Cultural Facility for guidance and support.