Manly Honors

MANLY HONOR: Part 3

The Victorian Era and the Development of the Stoic-Christian Code of Honor

By Brother Brett McKay

Lodge Veritas #556, Norman Oklahoma

NEW VOLUME 3


The topic of honor in the Victorian period is the most complex part of a complex evolution, as it involves a myriad of influences and factors.


Understanding the Class System in England


At the start of the Victorian era (1830s-1900), English society was highly stratified and hierarchical, and the population fell into three main classes. The idea of classes is hard for us to fully grasp from our modern viewpoint. We often think of them as having to do entirely with income level, and while that was certainly a factor, it also depended on values, education, occupation, family connections and history, birth, as well as your manners, speech, and clothing.


At the top of the heap was the landed aristocracy (meaning land ownership was part of their noble privilege). This "peerage" held titles of nobility and largely descended from the warrior nobility of the Middle Ages who had successfully battled for fiefdoms and then defended those territories from would-be usurpers. They owned land, but rented it to others to work. Right below the peerage was the gentry. Because of the system of primogeniture, only the first born sons inherited a title. Younger sons belonged to the gentry, and though they lacked a title, they were still considered nobility, and true "gentlemen." Whether titled or not, one of the defining qualities of the upper class was that they did not have to work, nor taint themselves with the commonness of trade to earn a living; their income came wholly from owning and renting out land.


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