Parenting Digital Natives

building the tools for safe and savvy digital connectedness

Media Literacy

27-7 streaming news feeds, citizen journalism, and the ease of digital content creation have radically changed information dissemination in the digital age. Learn the habits of fact-checkers and the impact of filter bubbles in order to be a savvy consumer of media and a productive participant in online and in-person discourse.

Parenting the Digital Native

Think of smart devices like drivers' licenses.

Once teens can drive their independence and unsupervised activities increase dramatically as does their responsibility to assist their families with errands and vehicle upkeep.

The same is true for devices. They are the gateway to worlds of learning, entertainment, employment and enrichment experiences and opportunities. Yet, without guidance and scaffolded introduction to these worlds, they are also easily misused and abused. Children and teens need support learning that with the rights of digital communication come responsibilities they must uphold:

  • with the right to have voice and agency, comes the responsibility to share accurately and truthfully.
  • with the right to be digitally connected comes the responsibility to be kind.
  • with the right to be safe and secure online comes the responsibility to implement, monitor, and maintain safety settings and protocols.

Workshops

Check the schedule below for opportunities to participate in my seminar for digitally connected adults and parents. Email Jackie"@"mediatedmessages.org to schedule a session.

Schedule of Events

Rescheduled due to snow: April 26, 2018 - Mark Twain Library, Redding, CT , 7:30-8:30PM

Fake, misleading or inaccurate information disguised as news is not a new phenomenon. What is new: Anyone with a smartphone and WiFi connection can create and perpetuate content. This two-part seminar will equip us to become media savvy. Part One will examine the habits of fact-checkers and the impact of filter bubbles, as well as the tools we can use in order to be productive participants in online and in-person discourse. The discussion will focus on what we can do to nurture media literacy.


April 10, 2018 - Danbury Public Library; 5:30-6:30 PM

Efforts to control the spread of information date back to Middle Ages. Mass communication is paramount to informing ourselves and our opinions. Furthermore, fake, misleading or inaccurate information disguised as news is nothing new; it is phenomenon that also dates back centuries.

Here’s what is new: Anyone with a smartphone and wifi connection can create and perpetuate content. Thus we must become media savvy which means developing the habits of fact-checkers, understanding the impact of filter bubbles, as well as learning the tools we can use in order to be productive participants in online and in-person discourse. This interactive discussion will provide instruction and practice in media literacy strategies.

July 23 & 30 (2-Part series) - Danbury Public Library; 5:30-6:30 PM

Part 1: Media Literacy (same session as April 10)

Part 2: Parenting the digitally engaged teenager.