Who?

Kelly Hogan and Viji Sathy are both award winning instructors with a combined 25+ years in the classroom at the University of North Carolina. They are passionate about student success, equity, and inclusion in the classroom. They have expertise on inclusive techniques and active learning in any size crowd, because both teach courses routinely with hundreds of students. On their campus, they lead innovative classroom and diversity administrative initiatives that benefit all students, faculty, and staff. Both are leading the campus in curriculum reforms, bringing course-based undergraduate research experiences and makerspace courses to all disciplines. Kelly and Viji have shared their work with faculty through hands-on workshops at numerous types of institutions. Both have been featured experts in ACUE's Course on Teaching Effectiveness, have been active in the scholarship of teaching and learning in their respective disciplines of biology and statistics, and their work has been featured in a number of national publications such as The Chronicle of Higher Education and the New York Times.

Kelly Hogan, PhD, is a STEM Teaching Professor in the Department of Biology, Assistant Dean of the Office of Instructional Innovation and Director of the University's Quality Enhancement Plan associated with SACSCOC accreditation.

By demonstrating the effectiveness of her methods in large lecture classes, her work has received national attention in publications such as The New York Times, The Atlantic and Insight Diversity.

Hogan works with many of Carolina’s faculty to help them re-imagine their teaching and she has also shared her techniques with educators from institutions across the state and nation. Her teaching has also impacted a student audience far beyond those in her UNC-Chapel Hill classes. As the co-author of several biology textbooks (Campbell Biology’s Concepts and Connections and Essential Biology), Hogan has reached hundreds of thousands of students globally. She has also been recognized by her students through nine different campus, state and national awards for teaching, mentoring and advising. Hogan was the commencement speaker for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015. She has been a driver of institutional reform within STEM to ensure that the gateway science courses are taught with high structure, active learning. Hogan completed her undergraduate degree in biology at The College of New Jersey in Ewing, New Jersey (B.S. 1996) and earned her doctorate from UNC-Chapel Hill (Ph.D. 2001).

pronouns: she/her/hers

Viji Sathy, PhD, is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Special Projects Assistant to the Senior Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and Program Evaluator of the Chancellor’s Science Scholars.

Sathy is actively involved in instructional innovation and assisting colleagues in promoting evidence-based educational practices. She speaks to many groups nationally on the flipped classroom in higher education. Her research involves evaluating the impact of innovative teaching techniques as well as retention in STEM courses. Sathy is also the Program Evaluator of the Chancellor’s Science Scholars an adaptation of the Meyerhoff Scholarship at the University of Maryland Baltimore County that has successfully increased representation of underrepresented students in STEM PhDs. She teaches quantitative courses: statistical principles in psychological research and research methods. She is the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education and the campus’ Student’s choice for Best Professor at UNC. Prior to her current position at UNC, she worked at the College Board conducting research on the SATs and non-cognitive predictors of college success. Sathy completed her undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (B.S. 1996). Based largely on the experience she had in her undergraduate statistics course, she went on to earn her doctorate in psychometrics from UNC-Chapel Hill (Ph.D. 2003).

pronouns: she/her/hers

Name Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/vijisathy_mp4

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