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Elf Cottage Build (Interior Renovation)

The Elf Cottage.

( A Luxury Pup Tent on Wheels! )

Last Updated November 12th, 2013
I have gotten much farther since then and need to update.
I have added some ceiling covers, installed the van spotlights,
and phase one of forced air vents for heating and cooling.
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If you want to join in and comment on an examination of the build, you will have to sign in at the "teardrops and tiny travel trailer" web pages:
http://www.tnttt.com
Go to the "Builds" forum and look up The Elf Cottage.
http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?t=48462
(Otherwise you can look over the build and my commentary here.)

All orientations in these descriptions are related to the trailer's forward towing motion, unless specifically mentioned otherwise.
Current "design challenges" are marked with an "*" in the Index.

Index

The Initial (Raw) Trailer
- Exterior
- Interior
- Previous Tenants

Walls / Cabinets
- Cut Outs

- Front Cabinets
- Desk Cabinet
- Paneling Cut-outs for Doors *
- Under-desk Panel Doors *
- Cabinet right 2 & 3 *

Wiring
- 120 VAC
- - 120 VAC Schematic

- 12 VDC
- Initial 12v Battery Schematic
- 12 VDC - Basic Plan
- 12v Closet - Phase II
- 12v - Lighting Controls
- 12VDC Battery #1 (peak portable)
- Inverter-Commercial Power Automated Wiring

Wheel Well Woes

Water Tanks

Progress
- Feb. 21st, 2012
- - Left Interior Wall *

- Mar. 12th, 2012
- - Right Interior Wall *


Accessories
- Solar Water Heater *
- Awning (semi-Installed) For Rainy Weather Egress *
- Thermometer Humidity
- Heater 110v 200w
- Vacuum 12v

Future Designs (* All)
- Inside ceiling over the rear doors
- Outside Table plan
- Stone Foundation Look
- Tongue Box Designs

Tools
- VCR-VHS-Plastic Case - Tool Box
- Halogen Light

How It Looks:
- How it was conceived
- How little kids see it
- How neighbors see it
- How co-workers see it
- How friends see it
- How girlfriend sees it
- How fellow td/ttt'ers see it
- How I see it



The Initial Trailer:

Exterior:
Initially, it was surmised to be a "Vinyl Siding Demo Trailer." It has the standard insulated sides, vinyl exterior walls, vinyl shingles and a vinyl window, double pane, double hung, tilt in to wash the outside and a vinyl screen. The entire structure is built upon a 4' x 8' piece of 5/8" particle board and bolted down to the metal frame inside the walls at several points. The walls are 2x4 stud walls. the insulation is standard at the outside, under the vinyl siding. The tilted angles of the roof make this extremely aero-dynamic, for a cottage on wheels "trailer." ;-)



The second owner used it for transporting cages of bunnies to children's birthday parties and store "Grand Openings."

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Interior (Raw):
The entrance is the double doors in the rear of the trailer.



The interior is much like that of a house with one exception. Instead of a drywall interior it has particle board (CFA) interior walls. This is because this is needed to support and stabilize the 2x4 stud wall frame and keep it from shifting.



As with homes, the frame for the window and door are double 2x4'd, as are the corners. This particle board surface is screwed to the inner walls and is going to stay there for two reasons. One, because I don't want to remove the entire outer surface of the trailer, put it outside the 2x4 studs, then reattach the insulation and the vinyl siding like most houses would have done. Two, I want the inner surface to have a strong surface to support the paneling and cabinet doors. The roof does have the CFA boards on the outside of the roof 2x4's, with the shingles on the outside of that.



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Previous Tenants:
Mud Wasps and Yellow Jacket Nests in the wall. I have since caulked these compartments very shut and sealed to the outside.


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Walls / Cabinets:

Cut Outs:

Here we have the raw inner wall, unscrewed from the 2x4 studs and laid down on some saw horses. The one square opening you see is for the window. That HAD to be square for the window and besides, I got it that way.



Now imagine what the frame in the wall looks like, just as if it were a house or a garage. 2x4 vertical studs, with a 2x4 along the top and the bottom. That frame work alone would not be enough to keep the house or garage walls square if I were to brake or accelerate. The outer wall in this case is vinyl siding and styrofoam insulation. No support there, only this inner wall, 1/2 inch particle board (CFA). If I want storage space I either have to sacrifice space on the inside, (4 foot by 8 foot floor, minus the stud walls) or I have to cut away the inner walls to gain the storage space in the walls between the 2x4 studs. If I just put in horizontal braces in the walls between the studs, like houses and garages use to keep the studs straight, it would not support the wall from deforming when I accelerate or brake. I would need to put in L brackets or T brackets at the joints top and bottom. Book shelf brackets inside the walls would not be very sturdy. Even L or T brackets on the inner face would have to be huge, thickness and width of the metal and length of the metal for leverage support. Plus the brackets would get in the way of the surface paneling from sitting very level, or supporting the surface of the paneling. The best shape I can use is like bridges, the triangle. I chose the octagon approach to put triangles at the top and floor beams to the wall studs yet still cut out the most of what I could between the studs.



To me this gives me maximum support and maximum access. I will still have unobstructed access to the entire volumes in the walls and it saves the structural support for the walls. All I have to do is screws along the top and bottom, and at the tips of each triangle(s) to the vertical studs for maximum support. You can also see the small cut outs top and bottom, fore and aft for the power outlets and the switches, outlets at the floor, switches up high. In the cut out wall, you can see where there are double 2x4's next to the window fore and aft, with single 2x4 studs in between the octagon openings. More of this becomes visible in the following pictures. The width and spacing of these cabinets is not however, otherwise uniform. Most are about about 17" +/-, but the front and back (of the trailer) cabinets are much smaller.


This last picture in many ways is THE MOST IMPORTANT ONE to understand what most of my build is going to be about. This shows you what my nose has been rubbed in from the start. In order to conserve every cubic inch of interior space, all of my storage space MUST BE IN the walls. I have been INFECTED with a bathroom "Medicine Chest Mentality!"



Maximum storage is as if medicine cabinets were in every possible wall cavity. How would you break down, organize and allocate camping items into the space of medicine cabinets, for walls 30" high, and two 8' side walls (widths - stud walls fore and aft) and one 40" wide forward wall (48" (4') minus two-2x4 stud walls right and left. All these wall spaces have a depth of 3.5" (2x4 is actually 1.5" x 3.5") In a few cases I might get the extra 1/2 inch depth of the particle board (CFA), so I surface mount all the cabinet doors, instead of recessing them. Welcome to the Elf Cottage Build. :-)

Here you can also see the redwood red, latex wood stain I used on the inner particle board walls. One of the problems with this trailer is that the particle board is very susceptible to water damage. Much more so than plywood, even. If the particle board gets wet, not only do the wood particles swell but the glue dissolves, the board swells and then finally it disintegrates. There is no way to undo the swelling of the wood. So by staining the wood with an oil based or latex based stain, the water doesn't penetrate and it becomes water resistant/repellent. So all walls and ceiling become stained during this process as well. The particle board walls get redwood red latex and the ceiling particle boards get a dark navy blue oil. Both of which I was given free. (The oil was kind of old and smells yet when heated. I'll be happy when the ceiling gets sealed. From here on out it's latex only for me.) The floor got brown floor/porch - wood/concrete latex, two coats, which helped with the splinter/particles too, for laying on. Later, the insides of the cabinets (styrofoam & studs) get a tanish-brown interior latex, which I had left from other painting jobs.

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Front Cabinets:
In these views you see what I did with the front wall. The front wall was easiest because it is slightly less than 4 feet wide, so I only needed one width of the paneling for the whole wall. Also, the studs in the wall made 4 similar areas and the 2 doors that I had scrounged for that wall pretty much fit that wall the way you see it. This opening I decided to go more free form / French curve for styling, as well.



The 2x2's pillars that the doors attach to are now stained a dark walnut to go with the doors. Because of the dark color scheme I decided to call that "The Bedroom" area of the trailer (even though it is single room, no inner partitions.)



One other thing I can show at this point, the paneling of 8' is 96", cut 2 - 4'x8' sheets of paneling into thirds of length, and you get 6 - 4' wide panels of 32" high. Then, of the six, I use two for each side wall (8') and one for each, the front and back. 32" tall. This gives me the PERFECT height you see here to JUST graze the roof beams. Perfect join. :-)
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Desk Cabinet:
Here you see one of the exceptions to the "Medicine cabinet mentality." The fold down desk gives me table space and it was placed next to the door so I could enjoy it with the door(s) open and me looking out. I still have the storage room in the wall, also, plus in this case the depth of the particle board. I was able to fit the support braces to the outer side stud with a little creativity. The hinges were another matter and I had to put in the 2x4 boards for the bridge across the studs since the outer wall is nothing more than styrofoam and thin vinyl siding. These cross beams of 2x4 hold the hinges for the fold down desk but also block the bottom half of the space from access through the top. Also, since you can see the top of the 2x4 cross members, I'll have to face with the 2x4 with the same 1/2 inch particle board or that space between the 2x4 and the front paneling will allow things to fall into the bottom half. I'm considering drilling holes for pencil holders and hooks for elastic bands to hold papers and clipboards. Hmmm, maybe a calendar... If you look in the top back of the two photos here you can see that a box of tissues fits pretty exactly into the walls. :-)


The paneling went in pretty smoothly for the upper half of this section. I was able to hide the cuts in the normal paneling grooves or under the desk shelf. If you look closely in the fourth picture here, just under the desk, and compare it with upper pictures, you can see that I saved the material from the particle board cut out of the wall, and here used a piece to precisely fill in along the shelf of the 2x4 width to the inner level of the particle wall, so that shelf is flush to the outer (inner trailer) surface. That will provide a perfect backing support for the paneling on the wall just below the desk. That paneling with the filler piece with seal the shelf up agains the paneling so I don't lose anything down into the lower storage area. (I suppose I should caulk it just to be sure. ) The desk was from a computer hutch and I also have the matching door set from the original cabinet that I am going to use on the wall opposite the desk. (the two compartment on the right side of the trailer, just inside the outer doors to the trailer. These cabinet doors all have magnetic latches to hold them closed.(I just have to install them. ;-)


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Under-desk Panel Doors:
One of my challenges with the cabinets is that I want to use the paneling opening cutout as the door to the compartment. For the two storage areas under the shelf, under the desk, I will just use the paneling opening cut outs, on hinges with springs for the cabinet doors, so I won't have to worry about getting doors for those. Here are the raw doors, freshly cut from the paneling. I notched them for the hinges. Then I put a piece of 1/4 round, 3/4 inch on the back, glued with wood glue and clamped. The final stage is to put the hinges on, before bolting in place.



Here you see the right, under-desk compartment open and then the right, under-desk compartment closed. In these instances, for looks, I put the wall anchor points of the hinges in between the paneling and the particle board backing, then screwed through the paneling, through the hinge holes, into the particle board. It's a snug fit for the doors. I'm thinking a dark brown ribbon loop to pull these open with and then the springs to hold them closed. (any suggestions welcome)


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Paneling Cut-outs for Doors: *
Here is the 110v utility cabinet door. So far I am using 1/4 round, 1/2 inch moldings to anchor the hinges, and give some "lift" to the spring path for leverage. Here the hinge screws to the back of the 1/4 round molding for the door side, and slips between the paneling and the particle board, and is then screwed through the paneling to the particle board for the door mounting. Shown here next is the 12v utility cabinet door, unattached and awaiting ideas... There is no latch to these doors. I want to find a way to have no door knob "Lump" on the door surface so that it is comfortable to lean up against the wall. So far I am thinking "Hole with a loop of colored parachute cord hanging out."



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Cabinet right 2 & 3: *
Here is a look at the final door set, for the right side forward two cabinets. (guest room and dining room) That top section is not window, it is mirrors. :-) The handles are coming off and going to my "barter bucket." Don't want to have to lean up against them sitting inside and playing euchre. :-) I'm still trying to decide whether to mount them the normal way, high in the middle, or the narrow part in the middle and have them look like saloon doors. (added advantage is a two sided look to make sure my bald spot shines just right, for the ladies. ;-)


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Wiring

120 volt AC
120 volts AC comes in at the back, left, bottom through a 3 pronged plug in a "wet location" outside electrical box, which can be be disconnected from external power and stored in the box for travel. The first stop for the 120 v AC power inside the trailer is a GFI outlet, at the back, bottom, left interior of the trailer. All subsequent wiring down stream goes through this GFI circuit. Next stop is the back, left, top of the interior to a double switch. The back switch is for the external outlet at the bottom rear, right of the trailer. (shown last here). The right switch here is part of a 3-way switch system, which goes to the top outlet at the center of the ceiling, with the other half of the 3-way switch system at the front, left, top of the interior, a single lighted switch. (in the "bedroom") The back plate on this switch has on its face a thermometer and a colorized humidity gauge. The lower outlet of the center of the ceiling is always on. The under, back, right side, outgoing outlet is enclosed in a "wet location" box with a "vintage" screw to close cover, single outlet. Due to salting of the roads in Michigan the aluminum here is poly'd. The last picture is of the wire run at the top of the left wall, behind the paneling. white is the 120 volt romex, 14 gauge, and the blue wires in the back are for the 3-way circuit.





120 VAC Schematic


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12 Volt Wiring
Initial 12v Battery Schematic
Three levels of battery power, each level supplying power to the next lower amperage, more critical level. Top level charging. Individually fused levels. Charge indicators for each level, that also indicates fuse condition.


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12 Volt Wiring - Basic Plan
The 12 volt DC utility closet is the left side, forward closet. The door to the closet is the cutout of the paneling for the opening, will be spring loaded and hinged. Currently no handle is designed. This cabinet holds the low-current battery(s), the trickle chargers' power strip, and the 12 volt DC distribution and fuses. The third picture shows the power strip for the wall wart's to trickle charge all the various batteries. (portable 12v, phones, laptops, low-current stationary). The terminal connections I decided to use for the 12 volt system is actually a 110vac, 50 amp with ground outlet, mounted backwards on its cover plate and the plate mounted on a plywood piece in the closet.(remember the walls are styrofoam) What that does for me is give me some high amp screw terminals (50 amp) for four separate circuits and so independent fusing. I have two sets of double swivel lights from an ex-Van for fore and aft on the ceiling. This lighting will probably get a 5 amp fuse. I also have a 10 amp auto reset breaker that fits in the old glass with metal caps type fuse holder, which I intend to use for the 12 volt lighter type outlets. (what does a lighter draw anyway?) Then I will have some LED lighting that runs off the 12vdc. I am planning on running a loop around the top of the walls of 8 conductor cable, with 2 being -12vdc, and the rest being various LED power circuit wires. The advantage advantage of doing the loop idea is that I then have basically two strands going to any location, so better current carry with less voltage drop. The reason for the two wires for -12vdc is because I didn't want to go pairs and only have 4 LED circuits, but wanted more than 1 -12vdc (ground) return, to protect against voltage drop. At 7 - pos. circuits to the one negative common, even if there are only LED's on the circuits.





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12v Closet - Phase II
Second phase level of the 12volt closet. Shelf for the small battery installed. Small battery and charger in place, for light duty and LED circuits. Panel cut for switches and indicator lights. Heavy duty (outlets) and light duty (dome/swivel lights) 12 volt wires present.



12v - Lighting Controls
Planned 12v Controls
There are 3 levels (buses) of 12v power planned.
1. Heavy duty: 12v lighter type outlets.
2. Light duty: Dome type lighting and USB device charging.
3. LED: Lighting.
There are controls planned for two levels of the 12v power, buses. The "light" wiring of the light duty bus will be switched like a dome light control, as On-Off-Door, so if the doors are open the lights that are switched on "locally" will come on. There will be an unswitched/constant-on light duty bus wiring cabled in with the LED cable. The LED wiring will have switches for white, red and green LED lighting.
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Portable Battery pack
(for those who have already made the mistake of buying a peak jump booster)
I had already bought this and when I first needed it and tried it, no luck, on a 4 cyl. engine. Peak Jump-Starter 300. Looks like I'll at least have a portable, rechargeable 12volt source for the trailer. Here's the operation so far... There is a switch on the face to activate the cable clamps. There is a charge port, the hole with a spike in the middle for a wall power supply (300ma.) (this means if you drain it in one second, it will take 1000 seconds to recharge it.) It also has a lighter type 12vdc port, and the cable to charge from a car lighter can also make a provider of 12vdc from that port. I think I'll use it for a reading light, LED type. I plan to attach it near the head of the trailer, far input and run some wires through the 12vdc closet and distribution panel to be the main power source for 12vdc. My amp hours will be backed up there with some other rechargeable small 12vdc batteries. The others will not power the aux. lighter outlets near the door, but they will power the lights, 12vdc van swivels and LED's. the different batteries will have different chargers, but they will all plug into a single switched outlet strip, also in the 12vdc closet. The picture #2 here shows a back plate bracket from a Zenith pc. (old) The reason I chose that is the hole near the bottom. If I turn the Peak Battery over to the cable clamp holders, I can bend and wrap these brackets around the plastic posts, clamp the cable on to them, and attach wires via crimp eyelets to the PC brackets to feed off power. These are switched on and off from the front of the battery pack. Then I'll use "broom handle" type clamps to hold the battery pack in place. :-)





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Inverter-Commercial Power Automated Wiring
We don't want the inverter trying to run at the same time the commercial power is connected. It would be nice to "Idiot proof" such a situation.

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Wheel Well Woes
The wheel wells were too small for the tires that came with the trailer. The tires that came with the trailer are an industry standard and are carried by just about every tire and trailer place. So replace or modify the wheel wells was the only option. (On the maiden trip with me, the left wheel well popped it's welds and fell off even. Lucky for me I was able to recover it, since it fits the cut-out of the vinyl siding. Lo and behold though, there is NO covering over the foam insulation inside the wheel wells either so that has to be fixed too! I put something in the cabinet of the wheel wells and it might roll into the street out the bottom if it was a pen or something a little larger.
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Water Tanks
The water supply and grey water storage plan is to use 4" PVC type pipes, at just under 4' lengths to go the width of the trailer underneath. The current plan is 3 cold water, 2 hot water, and 4 grey water storage tanks. I now have an idea to have my fill point at the right front corner soffit/eaves... That would give me an access point, semi-hidden, with some elevation for the venting of pressure to the fresh water system.

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Progress
Feb. 21st, 2012
Left Interior Wall:
View of the interior, left wall. At this point all but the center section of wall is finished. I just put the piece in place to show the finished look. I still have the inner window trim to put in, and the window dressings. I don't have the spring put on the 12 volt closet door yet, but it is attached. You can see the outlet at the back base of the wall, and the 3-way switch at the back, top with the thermometer/humidity gauge cover plate (I'm considering painting it white.) Under the desk the paneling looks whole in this picture, but... Under-desk Panel Doors


- Raw Interior View (for comparison)

Full View (left to right)




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Mar. 12th, 2012
- Right Interior Wall *

The right rear cabinet doors have been installed. These are sections R4, 5, and 6. Section 6 is to be the poles, ropes, tarp, stakes for the tarp. Plus, at the base is the double 12v outlet.








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Accessories

- Solar Water Heater *
I want to put in solar water heating in the ceiling. This will involve coils of hosing in the various shaped areas between the joists and studs of the ceiling, as well as a pump dedicated to just the hot water heater. Also this will be restricted to non-winter use.








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Thermometer - Humidity:
The back plate for the 3-way switch in the bedroom area (head of the bed) is one that has a thermometer and the ole reliable pink/blue humidity gauge on it. The only draw back is that the thermometer only goes down to +10F on it. Definitely NOT Michigan campers who made that thing.


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Awning (semi-Installed) For Rainy Weather Egress)
The awning is mostly for rainy weather getting in and out. This reduces the amount of getting rained on as I pause to climb in or out, and open or close the door(s). Bottom, edge and top views. Yes the boards are curved, purposely chosen that way for the rain to go off the sides instead of straight down the middle. Yes, I need one corner to spend some time with a heat gun. :-) Still working out the plan for braces. I should brace on the trailer and not rely on the ground to be flat. Means a few more additions to the awning...



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Heater 110v 200w
Low tech forced air heater, but it fits in the wall cabinets. Fine for when little heat is needed. The aiming heat vent is nice for moving around inside, too. Old 200W hair dryer = a little over 600 BTU's.


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Vacuum 12v
12 volt vacuum. For cleaning AND making space bags for various cloth storage. I'm going to try it on my sleeping bags and foam mattress, as well as clothes.


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Future Designs

Front-Rear Ceiling Plan
Over the door(s) in the ceiling wells between the ceiling joist/studs, I want other than plain cabinets. There are things that should be handy to the outside and yet needed on the inside as well. I don't want over duplication in the design. Things like access to paper towels, T.P., tissues, plastic bags, and a U.S.B. charge area. Probably dishes and silverware.


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Table Plan:
I want to make a table pullout that stores under the back end and has fold out legs.


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Stone Foundation Look:
Trying out ideas for future builds and modifications.
This idea has it with a stone "look" foundation look.


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Tongue Box Designs
Some ideas for a tongue box are an air-conditioning unit (round/square) or a hedge.


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Tools

VCR/VHS Plastic Case - Tool Box
I am going to see how many tools I can fit into VHS-VCR plastic boxes, for tool kits.


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Halogen Light:
I wanted to fix it so the light could be tilted and still have a better, stable footing.
So I made a foot for it. With a power strip to the side and a swivel raised area for better, farther tilting and aiming. Plus, you know those things that bundles of vertical blind slats come on, the hooks. Well, I've been saving them and I finally found a use for them. I put two on the light base, on 90 degrees out sides. (top and side) I used the screw holes to swivel the hooks, too. So now I can hang this thing. :-)




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How My Trailer It Is Seen:
- How it was conceived
- How little kids see it
- How neighbors see it
- How co-workers see it
- How friends see it
- How girlfriend sees it
- How fellow td/ttt'ers see it
- How I see it

Humourous look at how various people view my Tiny Travel Trailer project.

- How it was conceived


- How girlfriend sees it


- How little kids see it


- How co-workers see it


- How neighbors see it


- How friends see it


- How fellow td/ttt'ers see it


- How I see it


- How it actually looks - Interior/Exterior


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Index-How My Trailer Is Seen:



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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:16 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:16 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 3, 2012, 10:34 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 1:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 1:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 1:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 31, 2012, 7:56 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 1:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 1:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jun 13, 2012, 10:37 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 10:54 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 10:54 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 10:54 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:27 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:28 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:28 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:28 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:28 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:29 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:29 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 27, 2012, 9:29 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Aug 8, 2012, 8:17 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 3:10 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 12:00 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 3:10 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 3:11 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 31, 2012, 7:56 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 3:41 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 3:41 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 5, 2012, 8:03 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 5, 2012, 8:02 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 5, 2012, 8:02 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Nov 30, 2014, 9:36 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 5, 2012, 8:02 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 13, 2012, 9:31 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 11:37 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 15, 2012, 7:08 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 15, 2012, 7:08 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 15, 2012, 7:08 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 18, 2013, 8:52 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 29, 2012, 5:42 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 8:11 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 8:41 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 8:41 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 11:29 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 24, 2012, 11:29 AM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 13, 2012, 3:43 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
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Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 8:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 14, 2012, 8:47 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 2:40 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 12:57 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 28, 2012, 12:57 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 31, 2012, 7:56 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 29, 2012, 4:44 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:28 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:29 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:29 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:29 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 8, 2012, 1:50 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:37 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 6, 2012, 5:29 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 29, 2012, 4:44 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 31, 2012, 7:57 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 25, 2012, 11:10 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 25, 2012, 11:10 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 25, 2012, 11:10 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 23, 2012, 11:22 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 23, 2012, 11:22 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 23, 2012, 11:22 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 23, 2012, 11:23 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 22, 2012, 11:43 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Feb 1, 2012, 9:11 AM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Jan 30, 2012, 12:42 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:38 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Mar 2, 2012, 1:02 PM
ą
Tom E. Headrick,
Dec 2, 2012, 12:03 PM
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