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Lionel Blackman

Qualified in 1986 and opened an independent criminal defence practice in 1989. Became the first solicitor to lead and win a case in the House of Lords in 1999 [Morgans v Director of Public Prosecutions] - a ruling against the use in evidence of police intercepted telephone calls. Has conducted over 50 jury trials and as leading advocate secured acquittals in murder and manslaughter trials at the Old Bailey.**  He has several reported legal precedents to his name.

Mr Blackman represented the notorious Michael Wheatley (known by the media as “the skull-cracker”) at his Crown Court sentencing hearing on 29th May 2014. He has defended a wide range of other criminal cases from rape to fraud to dangerous dogs.

He is a  Visiting Fellow at London South Bank University in Criminal Litigation at Masters level and has lectured overseas on various aspects of the English legal system and the use of high technology in criminal trials.      Currently, he is Director of the Solicitors' International Human Rights Group and his office houses the Group's administration.

Judicial testimonials:

In the House of Lords - in overruling a decision of the Court of Appeal in which he had presided Lord Steyn said of Mr Blackman "Eight years later, aided by the incisive arguments of counsel in the present case, I have had an opportunity to re-examine the point. I am now fully persuaded that my earlier interpretation was wrong.”


In the Westminster Coroner's Court Dr Paul Knapman said of Mr Blackman: “I believe Mr Taylor has been very fortunate in his choice of solicitor. The only evidence upon which Mr Taylor was charged was the scientific evidence – it is a fact that only the assiduous collation of scientific evidence by Mr Blackman has saved Mr Taylor from a trial at the Old Bailey which might have resulted in a verdict of guilty.”


Of nine homicide cases conducted as advocate Mr Blackman's acquittal rate is 66% compared with the national rate of acquittal of just 16% for the three years 2009/10 through 2011/12 (See ONS statistics HERE)