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This website is the central hub of the assessment of the Lehman College major in Mathematics.  The goals of the mathematics major are available on the Lehman Math Major Goals Site (googledoc).  The learning outcomes for each of the required courses for the mathematics major are on the Lehman Math Outcomes Grid.  They correspond to the outcomes recommended by the MAA and used at CCNY, another senior college in the City University of New York.   Individual courses required for the major have their own webpages and can be accessed directly via the sidebar (on the left).

Syllabi and Outcomes:

The uniform syllabi for prerequisites to the major and the calculus sequence are on the Lehman College Calculus Site.  These syllabi are designed by the calculus committee and approved by the educational policy committee of the department.  Instructors will add a supplement to the syllabus with their information and their sections' grading policies based upon this template.  Uniform finals are only given in the first few classes that have many sections and are taught primarily by adjuncts. 

Syllabi for advanced courses in the math major are on the Lehman Advanced Math Courses Site and are subject to change as the professor sees fit.  Advanced mathematics courses are taught by research mathematicians who apply their particular expertise when selecting which topics to emphasize.  It is natural for these courses to vary somewhat from semester to semester.  However, professors are encouraged to use a standard template and to keep in mind the department mathematics outcomes and the bulletin description when designing their syllabi.  

Each semester we file a semester report.

Updated Assessment Plan (Fall 2012):

As we progress through the years, different courses will be assessed in order.  Assessments of courses using the new system of outcomes began in Spring 2010.  Assessments of the lower level courses, College Algebra-Calculus, will involve a reevaluation of uniform syllabi which include careful scheduling of every chapter in the textbook.  Such courses have always been reevaluated by the calculus committee, but modern methods using outcomes only began in 2010.  Assessments of advanced courses will be done on a more individual basis by faculty.   Every semester, course outcomes will be tested on a final exam in all math courses.   The schedule for thorough assessment of particular courses is on the updated
Math Assessment Schedule Spreadsheet.  Reports on the thoroughly assessed courses will become available at this site when they are completed.  The reports will be organized by course (select the course number from the column on the left) and by semester (select the semester report from the column on the left).

Modern assessment of the lower level courses began with the collection of data for College Algebra on our uniform final in Spring 2010.  This data consists of the scores of all students on each question of the uniform departmental final.  These questions on the final directly measure the various outcomes for the course.   Every semester we will assess a different lower level course using a uniform departmental final.   These courses will be assessed in order as follows MAT104, MAT172, MAT175/MAT155 and MAT176/MAT156 in a two year cycle as described on the Math Assessment Schedule Spreadsheet linked to above.   

More advanced courses without uniform syllabi will be assessed every few years by the faculty teaching the course using their own assessment materials.   These courses include the courses required for the math major: MAT226, MAT313, MAT314 and MAT320 as well as the courses required for future teachers MAT237 and MAT345.  Other advanced courses are electives and vary from year to year.   Although these courses have been tentatively listed on the schedule, the exact timing of their assessment will vary.

The major itself will be assessed by directly testing students on their achievement of the math major outcomes in the required courses of the math major.   For mathematics, every outcome is directly measured in multiple courses via final exams with an emphasis on Technology in the Calculus Laboratory Sequence (MAT155 and MAT156) and an emphasis on Constructing a Rigorous Mathematical Argument in Real Analysis (MAT320) and Modern Algebra (MAT314).  Other outcomes of the mathematics major appear repeatedly throughout the major.  Naturally students may take electives providing further emphasis on any particular outcome which is most relevant to their career path.  Future teachers, in particular, are required to take Modern Geometry (MAT345) and Discrete Mathematics (MAT237).  Students interested in enhancing their computer programming skills may elect to take Programming Methods I (CMP230) which is assessed as part of the Computer Science major.  Each math course objective has been assigned one or more corresponding major objectives (see the syllabi).  In this way we may progress through the assessment of the major outcomes as well as the courses' outcomes using the same direct measure: the final exam.   The outcomes of the major are distributed into the
required courses of the major as described on the Math Assessment Schedule Spreadsheet.    We have the same outcomes and distribution as in the original plan only the assessment schedule has been updated.


Original January 2010 Two Year Assessment Plan:      

As we progress through the years, different courses will be assessed in order.  Assessments of courses using the new system of outcomes began in Spring 2010.  Assessments of the lower level courses, College Algebra-Calculus, will involve a reevaluation of uniform syllabi which include careful scheduling of every chapter in the textbook.  Such courses have always been reevaluated by the calculus committee, but modern methods using outcomes only began in 2010.  Assessments of advanced courses will be done on a more individual basis by faculty.   Every semester, course outcomes will be tested on a final exam in all math courses.   The schedule for thorough assessment of particular courses is on the Math Assessment Schedule Site (googledoc)  Reports on the thoroughly assessed courses will become available at this site when they are completed.  The reports will be organized by course (select the course number from the column on the left) and by semester (select the semester report from the column on the left).

Modern assessment of the lower level courses began with the collection of data for College Algebra on our uniform final in Spring 2010.  This data consists of the scores of all students on each question of the uniform departmental final.  These questions on the final directly measure the various outcomes for the course.   In Fall 2010 we will proceed to Precalculus, then Calculus I in Spring 2011, then Calculus II in Fall 2011 and back to College Algebra over a two year cycle.   For each course, the assessment will begin with data collection, followed by analysis, followed by proposals to the Educational Policy Committee and ending with possible adjustments to the syllabi if needed.  In addition to assessing for outcomes, we will continue our traditional methods of assessment in which a course is judged not only by progress of the students in the course, but by their success in subsequent courses.  For this reason we are assessing the sequence in ascending order.

More advanced courses without uniform syllabi will be assessed every few years by the faculty teaching the course.  This assessment began with data collection on Geometry in Spring 2010 ( a course designed with NSF funding through the MTTI program to train teachers to teach the new NYS HS curriculum).  The Geometry course's outcomes are assessed through various problems on the final exam.  Data on course projects has also been collected.  In Fall 2010 data will be collected on Analysis I ( a required course in the math major) and on Discrete Math (another course to train teachers).  In 2011, we will assess Linear Algebra and Modern Algebra.  Analysis of the data will be completed the semester after the data is collected and faculty will be informed of the results so that they may adapt their courses accordingly.  The data in each situation will consist of recording the performance of students on problems on the finals pertaining to each specific course objective.

The major itself will be assessed by directly testing students on their achievement of the math major outcomes in the required courses of the math major.   For mathematics, every outcome is directly measured in multiple courses via final exams with an emphasis on Technology in the Calculus Laboratory Sequence (MAT155 and MAT156) and an emphasis on Constructing a Rigorous Mathematical Argument in Real Analysis (MAT320) and Modern Algebra (MAT314).  Other outcomes of the mathematics major appear repeatedly throughout the major.  Naturally students may take electives providing further emphasis on any particular outcome which is most relevant to their career path.  Future teachers, in particular, are required to take Modern Geometry (MAT345) and Discrete Mathematics (MAT237).  Students interested in enhancing their computer programming skills may elect to take Programming Methods I (CMP230) which is assessed as part of the Computer Science major.  Each math course objective has been assigned one or more corresponding major objectives (see the syllabi).  In this way we may progress through the assessment of the major outcomes as well as the courses' outcomes using the same direct measure: the final exam.   The official Lehman College Charted Assessment Plan for the Math Major (googledoc) itemizes the outcomes of the major and how each is assessed.

Assessment Reports:

The reports are organized by course (select the course number from the column on the left) and by semester:


The Math Assessment Ambassador found it easier to create a website as a common repository for data and analysis rather than typing up a single report with appendices.  This website is publicly viewable.


Lehman College is part of the City University of New York.  This page is on google sites to allow easy interaction and editing of the documents by committees.   This site is maintained by Professor C. Sormani (Assessment Ambassador for Mathematics).