College and Career Readiness

The School District of Janesville is committed to providing a solid foundation for all students to be successful in their chosen path after graduation. To ensure our graduates are college and career ready, all students will create an Academic & Career Plan (ACP).

New Janesville superintendent looking to expand opportunities

"We need to be preparing kids for all career paths," Pophal said. "It's not enough to have a robust set of AP offerings. That's good, but there are so many other career paths that are not served by AP classes alone."

The Four keys to college and career readiness

Based on extensive research, Dr. David T. Conley and his colleagues at the Educational Policy Improvement Center developed an operational definition of college and career readiness that goes beyond course titles, grades, and test scores1. This model, termed the Four Keys of College and Career Readiness, includes: Key Cognitive Strategies, Key Content Knowledge, Key Learning Skills and Techniques, and Key Transition Knowledge and Skills.

Why is college and career readiness important for all students?

  • By 2018, 63 percent of all jobs in the United States and 90 percent of new jobs in growing industries will require some postsecondary training (Carnevale, Smith, & Strohl, 2010)
  • 37 percent of young adults from the general education population enroll in four-year colleges or universities, only 15 percent of high school graduates with disabilities do the same (Sanford et al., 2011)
  • 62 percent of white students complete their four-year college degrees, but only 50 percent of Hispanic students and 40 percent of black students graduate (Aud et al., 2012)
  • Failure to increase the numbers of college- and career-ready students will come at an immense cost - for both individual students and taxpayers
  • 20 percent of incoming freshmen at four-year institutions and 52 percent of those at two-year colleges require remedial courses (Complete College America, 2012)
  • Unemployment rate for students with only a high school diploma is 9.4 percent, compared to just 4.9 percent for those who have earned a bachelor's degree (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2012)
  • 7200 students drop out of school every day in America's public high schools (Education Week, June 2 2010)