Welcome! Get ready to explore career options!

Focusing On The Future

The concept of Career Pathways is based on the need to focus on planning for our students' futures. Upon entering junior high, specific activities are introduced to help students explore different careers and identify their own career goals. One such activity is the development of an Educational Development Plan (EDP) starting in seventh grade. Per the State of Michigan/Michigan Department of Education, this Educational Development Plan is the process of identifying career goals and how they are going to be achieved. Fowlerville Community Schools uses a program called XELLO for the development of EDPs. 

Additional career exploration activities in high school include various field trips, lunch & learns, work-based learning opportunities, and job shadow days provided by Livingston Educational Service Agency.

By participating in these career exploration opportunities, students should find it helpful as they select their high school courses and make their post high school plans. 

Career of the Week - 5/29/23


Respiratory Therapists

Respiratory Therapists care for patients who have trouble breathing—for example, because of conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Their patients range from premature infants with undeveloped lungs to older adults whose lungs are diseased. 


Respiratory Therapists typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Respiratory Therapists was $61,830 in May 2021. Employment of Respiratory Therapists is projected to grow by 14 percent, much faster than average from 2021 to 2031. About 9,400 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Respiratory Therapists typically need an associate’s degree in respiratory therapy. Some employers prefer to hire candidates who have a bachelor’s degree. Respiratory therapists must be licensed in all states except Alaska; requirements vary by state. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations, Health Science 

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Respiratory Therapists, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm#tab-1 (Visited May 30, 2023)

Career of the Week - 5/22/23


Data Scientists

Data Scientists use analytical tools and techniques to extract meaningful insights from data. 


Data Scientists typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Data Scientists was $100,910 in May 2021. Employment of Data Scientists is projected to grow by 36 percent, much faster than average from 2021 to 2031. About 13,500 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Data Scientists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, statistics, computer science, or a related field to enter the occupation. However, some employers require or prefer that candidates have a master’s or doctoral degree. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Computer Programming, Computer Network Engineering

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Data Scientists https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/data-scientists.htm#tab-1 (Visited May 22, 2023)

Career of the Week - 5/15/23


Medical Assistants

Medical Assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Their duties vary with the location, specialty, and size of the practice. 

Medical Assistants typically do the following:

The median annual wage for Medical Assistants was $37,190 in May 2021. Employment of Medical Assistants is projected to grow by 16 percent, much faster than average from 2021 to 2031. About 123,000 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Most Medical Assistants have a postsecondary education award such as a certificate. Others enter the occupation with a high school diploma and learn through on-the-job training. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Medical Assisting, Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Medical Assistants https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm#tab-1 (Visited May 15, 2023)

Career of the Week - 5/8/23


Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers use hand-held or remotely controlled equipment to join or cut metal parts. They also fill holes, indentations, or seams in metal products. 

Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers was $47,010 in May 2021. Employment of Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers is projected to grow by 2 percent, slower than average from 2021 to 2031.  Despite limited employment growth, about 47,600 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers typically need a high school diploma or equivalent, combined with technical and on-the-job training, to enter the occupation. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Welding Technology

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/welders-cutters-solderers-and-brazers.htm#tab-1 (Visited May 8, 2023)

Career of the Week - 5/1/23


Social and Human Service Assistants

Social and Human Service Assistants provide client services, including support for families, in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, and social work. They assist other workers, such as social workers, and they help clients find benefits or community services. 

Social and Human Service Assistants typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Social and Human Service Assistants was $37,610 in May 2021. Employment of Social and Human Service Assistants is projected to grow by 12 percent, much faster than average from 2021 to 2031.  About 55,900 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Social and Human Service Assistants typically have at least a high school diploma and must complete a brief period of on-the-job training.

Some employers require a criminal background check. Social and Human Service Assistants also may need a valid driver’s license.


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Science

High School - Psychology

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social and Human Service Assistants https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/social-and-human-service-assistants.htm#tab-1 (Visited May 1, 2023)

Career of the Week - 4/24/23


Construction Managers

Construction Managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from start to finish. 

Construction Managers typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Construction Managers was $98,890 in May 2021. Employment of Construction Managers is projected to grow by 8 percent, faster than average from 2021 to 2031.  About 41,500 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Construction Managers typically need a bachelor’s degree, and they learn management techniques through on-the-job training. Firms might hire as managers those who have a high school diploma and many years of experience in a construction trade; however, these people may be more likely to work as self-employed general contractors than to be hired as Construction Managers. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology or Livingston Career & Technical Education - Manufacturing

High School - Math, Science and Computer Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Construction Managers https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/construction-managers.htm#tab-1 (Visited April 24, 2023)

Career of the Week - 4/17/23


Assemblers and Fabricators

Assemblers and Fabricators build finished products and the parts that go into them. They use handtools and machines to make vehicles, toys, electronic devices, and more. 

Assemblers and Fabricators typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Assemblers and Fabricators was $37,170 in May 2021. Employment of Assemblers and Fabricators is projected to decline by 6 percent from 2021 to 2031.  Despite declining employment, about 192,100 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the decade! Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Assemblers and Fabricators typically need a high school diploma or equivalent to enter the occupation. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology or Livingston Career & Technical Education - Manufacturing

High School - Math, Science and Computer Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Assemblers and Fabricators https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/assemblers-and-fabricators.htm#tab-1 (Visited April 17, 2023)

Career of the Week - 4/10/23


Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians help mechanical engineers design, develop, test, and manufacture tools, engines, machines, and other devices. They may make sketches and rough layouts, record and analyze data, and report their findings. 

Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians was $60,460 in May 2021. Employment of Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians is projected to grow 2 percent from 2021 to 2031, slower than average for all occupations.  Despite limited employment growth, about 4,200 job openings are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians typically need an associate’s degrees or other postsecondary training to enter the occupation. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology or Livingston Career & Technical Education - Manufacturing

High School - Math, Science and Computer Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineering-technicians.htm#tab-1 (Visited April 3, 2023)

Career of the Week - 4/3/23


Police and Detectives

Police officers protect lives and property. Detectives and Criminal Investigators, who are sometimes called agents or special agents, gather facts and collect evidence of crimes. 

Police Officers, Detectives and Criminal Investigators typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Police and Detectives was $66,020 in May 2021. Employment of Police and Detectives is projected to grow 3 percent from 2021 to 2031, slower than average for all occupations.  Despite limited employment growth, about 68,500 job openings for Police and Detectives are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


The education typically required to enter the occupation ranges from a high school diploma to a college degree. Most Police and Detectives must graduate from their agency’s training academy before completing a period of on-the-job training. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, usually at least 21 years old, and able to meet rigorous physical and personal qualifications. A felony conviction or drug use may disqualify a candidate. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Wilson Talent Center - Law Enforcement

High School - Leadership, Emergency Response Readiness, Psychology, Government

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Police and Detectives, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/police-and-detectives.htm#tab-1 (Visited April 3, 2023)

Career of the Week - 3/20/23


Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, supervised by licensed Veterinarians, do medical tests that help diagnose animals’ injuries and illnesses. 

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians was $36,850 in May 2021. Employment of Veterinary Technologists and Technicians is projected to grow 20 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than average for all occupations.  About 15,500 job openings for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Veterinary Technologists and Technicians must complete a postsecondary program in veterinary technology. Technologists usually need a 4-year bachelor’s degree, and Technicians need a 2-year associate’s degree. Typically, both Technologists and Technicians must pass a credentialing exam to become registered, licensed, or certified, depending on the requirements of the state in which they work.

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Agriscience/ Botany / Zoology

High School - Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm#tab-1 (Visited March 20, 2023)

Career of the Week - 3/13/23


Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents

Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents help clients buy, sell, and rent properties.  Although Brokers and Agents do similar work, Brokers are licensed to manage their own real estate businesses. Sales Agents must work with a Real Estate Broker. 


Real Estate Brokers and Sale Agents typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents was $62,010 in May 2021. Employment of Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents is projected to grow 5 percent from 2021 to 2031, about as fast as average for all occupations.  About 54,800 job openings for Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents typically need a high school diploma or equivalent to enter the occupation. They also must complete a number of real estate courses and pass a licensing exam. States typically require licensed agents to have experience before obtaining a broker’s license. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Business and Marketing 

High School - Marketing

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/real-estate-brokers-and-sales-agents.htm#tab-1 (Visited March 13, 2023)

Career of the Week - 3/6/23


Dental Hygienist

Dental hygienists examine patients for signs of oral diseases, such as gingivitis, and provide preventive care, including oral hygiene. They also educate patients about oral health. 


Dental Hygienists typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Dental Hygienists was $77,810 in May 2021. Employment of Dental Hygienists is projected to grow 9 percent from 2021 to 2031, faster than average for all occupations.  About 16,300 job openings for Dental Hygienists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Dental Hygienists typically need an associate’s degree in dental hygiene. Programs usually take 3 years to complete. All states require dental hygienists to be licensed; requirements vary by state. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations or Health Science

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm#tab-1 (Visited March 6, 2023)

Career of the Week - 2/27/23


Dentist

Dentists diagnose and treat problems with patients’ teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of the teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health. 


Dentists typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Dentists was $163,220 in May 2021. Employment of Dentists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2021 to 2031, about as fast as the average for all occupations.  About 5,100 job openings for Dentists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Dentists must be licensed in the state in which they work. Licensure requirements vary by state, although candidates usually must have a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Medicine in Dentistry/Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree from an accredited dental program and pass written and clinical exams. Dentists who practice in a specialty area must complete postdoctoral training. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dentists.htm#tab-1 (Visited February 27, 2023)

Career of the Week - 2/20/23


Civil Engineer

Civil engineers conceive, design, build, supervise, operate, construct and maintain infrastructure projects and systems in the public and private sector, including roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and systems for water supply and sewage treatment. Many civil engineers work in planning, design, construction, research, and education. 


Civil Engineers typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Civil Engineers was $88,050in May 2021. Employment of Civil Engineers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2021 to 2031, about as fast as the average for all occupations.  About 24,200 job openings for Civil Engineers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Civil Engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree. They typically need a graduate degree and a license for promotion to senior positions. Although licensure requirements vary from state to state, civil engineers usually must be licensed if they provide services directly to the public. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center -  Construction Technology or Engineering Technology or Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/ Computer Aided Design or STEM

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Civil Engineer at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/civil-engineers.htm#tab-1 (Visited February 21, 2023)

Career of the Week - 2/13/23


Airline and Commercial Pilots

Airline and Commercial Pilots fly and navigate airplanes, helicopters, and other aircraft. 


Airline and Commercial Pilots typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Airline Pilots, Copilots and Flight Engineers was $202,180 in May 2021. Employment of Airline and Commercial Pilots is projected to grow 6 percent from 2021 to 2031, about as fast as the average for all occupations.  About 18,100 job openings for Airline and Commercial Pilots are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Airline pilots typically need a bachelor’s degree and experience as a commercial or military pilot. Commercial pilots typically need flight training, and some employers may require or prefer them to have a degree. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Aviation

High School - Math, Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Airline and Commercial Pilots at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/airline-and-commercial-pilots.htm#tab-1 (Visited February 13, 2023)

Career of the Week - 2/6/23


Coaches and Scouts


Coaches teach amateur and professional athletes the skills they need to succeed at their sport. Scouts look for new players, evaluating their skills and likelihood for success at the amateur, college, or professional level. Many coaches also are involved in scouting potential athletes for their team. 

Coaches typically do the following:


Scouts typically do the following:


The median annual wage for a Coach and Scout was $38,970 in May 2021. Employment of Coaches and Scouts is projected to grow 20 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 39,900 job openings for Coaches and Scouts are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. 


Coaches and Scouts typically need a bachelor’s degree. However, educational requirements for Coaches and Scouts may vary from no formal educational credential to a bachelor’s or higher degree. These workers also need extensive knowledge of the sport. Coaches typically gain this knowledge through their own experiences playing the sport at some level. Although previous playing experience may be beneficial, it is not required for most scouting jobs. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation 

High School - Physical Education, Health

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Coaches and Scouts at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-sports/coaches-and-scouts.htm#tab-1 (Visited February 6, 2023)

Career of the Week - 1/30/23


Financial Examiners


Financial examiners ensure compliance with laws that govern institutions handling monetary transactions. They review balance sheets, evaluate the risk level of loans, and assess bank management.

Financial Examiners typically do the following:



The median annual wage for a Financial Examiner was $81,410 in May 2021. Employment of a Financial Examiner is projected to grow 21 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 6,800 job openings for Financial Examiners are projected each year, on average, over the decade.


Financial Examiners typically need a bachelor’s degree that includes some coursework in accounting. Entry-level examiners are trained on the job by senior examiners. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Business and Risk Management and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Finance

High School - Math and Writing

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Examiners at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/financial-examiners.htm#tab-1 (Visited January 30, 2023)

Career of the Week - 1/23/23


Data Scientists


Data Scientists use analytical tools and techniques to extract meaningful insights from data.

Data Scientists typically do the following:



The median annual wage for a Data Scientist was $100,910 in May 2021. Employment of a Data Scientist is projected to grow 36 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 13,500 job openings for Data Scientists are projected each year, on average, over the decade.


Data Scientists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, statistics, computer science, or a related field to enter the occupation. However, some employers require or prefer that candidates have a master’s or doctoral degree. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Programming & Mobile Applications  and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Computer Programming or Computer Network Engineering 

High School - Business Computers

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Data Scientists at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/data-scientists.htm#tab-1 (Visited January 23, 2023)

Career of the Week - 1/16/23


Animal Care and Service Workers


Animal Care and Service Workers attend to or train animals. Working with pets and other nonfarm animals, these caretakers and trainers feed, groom, and exercise the animals or teach them to respond to human commands. 

Animal Care and Service Workers typically do the following:



The median annual wage for an Animal Care and Service Worker was $28,600 in May 2021. Employment of an Animal Care and Service Worker is projected to grow 29 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 80,900 job openings for Animal Care and Service Workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.


Animal Care and Service Workers typically need at least a high school diploma or equivalent.  Most Animal Care and Service Workers learn through on-the-job training. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

 Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Agri-Science, Botany &Zoology

High School - Biology and Anatomy Classes

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Animal Care and Service Worker at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/animal-care-and-service-workers.htm#tab-1 (Visited January 17, 2023)

Career of the Week - 1/9/23


Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides


Physical Therapist Assistants, sometimes called PTAs, and Physical Therapist Aides work under the direction and supervision of Physical Therapists. They help patients who are recovering from injuries and illnesses to regain movement and manage pain.

Physical Therapist Assistants are involved in the direct care of patients.

Physical Therapist Aides often have tasks that are indirectly related to patient care, such as cleaning and setting up the treatment area, moving patients, and doing clerical duties.

Physical Therapist Assistants typically do the following:


Physical Therapist Aides typically do the following:

The median annual wage for a Physical Therapist Assistant was $61,180 in May 2021 and for a Physical Therapist Aide, it was $29, 200 in May 2021. Employment of Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides is projected overall to grow 24 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 25,500 job openings for Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

 

Physical Therapist Assistants entering the occupation typically need an associate’s degree from an accredited program and a license or certification. Physical Therapist Aides usually need a high school diploma or equivalent and on-the-job training. 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Health Occupations and Health Science

High School - Biology and Anatomy Classes

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapist-assistants-and-aides.htm#tab-1 (Visited January 4, 2023)

Career of the Week - 12/19/22


Web Developers and Digital Designers

Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. In addition, web developers may create content for the site. Digital designers develop, create, and test website or interface layout, functions, and navigation for usability. They are responsible for the look and functionality of the website or interface.

Web Developers and Digital Designers typically do the following:



The median annual wage for a Web Developer and Digital Designer was $79,890 in May 2021. Employment of Web Developers and Digital Designers is projected to grow 23 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.  About 21,800 job openings for Web Developers and Digital Designers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

 

Educational requirements for Web Developers and Digital Designers range from a high school diploma to a bachelor’s degree.

Some employers prefer to hire Web Developer candidates who have a bachelor’s degree in a specific field, such as computer science or programming.


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Programming and Mobile Applications and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Computer Programming

High School - GRAPHIC DESIGN/WEB AUTHORING 

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Web Developers and Digital Designers at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/web-developers.htm#tab-1 (Visited December 19, 2022)

Career of the Week - 12/12/22


Pharmacist

Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. They also may conduct health and wellness screenings, provide immunizations, oversee the medications given to patients, and provide advice on healthy lifestyles.

Pharmacists typically do the following:



The median annual wage for a Pharmacist was $128,570 in May 2021. Employment of Pharmacists is projected to grow 2 percent from 2021 to 2031, much slower than the average for all occupations.  Despite limited employment growth, 13,600 openings for Pharmacists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. 

Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree from an accredited pharmacy program. They must also be licensed, which requires passing licensure and law exams. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Health Occupations

High School - Biology, Physics & Chemistry  

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Pharmacists at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacists.htm#tab-1 (Visited December 12, 2022)

Career of the Week - 12/5/22


Home Health and Personal Care Aides

Home Health and Personal Care Aides monitor the condition of people with disabilities or chronic illnesses and help them with daily living activities. They often help older adults who need assistance. Under the direction of a nurse or other healthcare practitioner, home health aides may be allowed to give a client medication or to check the client’s vital signs. 

Duties:

Home Health and Personal Care Aides typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Home Health and Personal Care Aides was $29,430 in May 2021. Employment of Home Health and Personal Care Aides is projected to grow 25 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations. About 711,700 openings for Home Health and Personal Care Aides are projected each year, on average, over the decade. 

Home Health and Personal Care Aides typically need a high school diploma or equivalent, but some positions do not require it. Those working in certified home health or hospice agencies must complete formal training and pass a standardized test. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare and Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Health Occupations

High School - Biology classes, Anatomy classes, Chemistry classes, & possibly Business & Computer classes

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Home Health and Personal Care Aides at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home-health-aides-and-personal-care-aides.htm#tab-1 (Visited December 5, 2022)

Career of the Week - 11/28/22


Forensic Science Technicians

Forensic science technicians aid criminal investigations by collecting and analyzing evidence. Many technicians specialize in either crime scene investigation or laboratory analysis.

Duties

Forensic science technicians work in laboratories and on crime scenes. At crime scenes, forensic science technicians typically do the following:


The median annual wage for Forensic Science Technicians was $61,930 in May 2021. Employment of Forensic Science Technicians is projected to grow 11 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations. About 2,500 openings for Forensic Science Technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. 

Forensic Science Technicians typically need at least a bachelor’s degree. On-the-job training is usually required both for those who investigate crime scenes and for those who work in labs. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security  (Criminal Justice) or Information Technology (Cybersecurity & Digital Forensics and Programming & Mobile Applications

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Forensic Science Technicians at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/forensic-science-technicians.htm#tab-1  (Visited November 28,2022)

Career of the Week - 11/14/22


Wind Turbine Technicians

Wind turbine service technicians, also known as windtechs, install, maintain, and repair wind turbines. 

Wind turbine service technicians typically do the following:


The median annual wage for wind turbine technicians was $56,260 in May 2021. Employment of wind turbine technicians is projected to grow 44 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations. About 1,900 openings for wind turbine technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. 

Most wind turbine service technicians, also known as windtechs, learn their trade by attending a technical school. They are also trained by their employer after hiring. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Energy

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Wind Turbine Technicians at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/wind-turbine-technicians.htm#tab-4  (Visited November 7,2022)

Career of the Week - 10/30/2022


Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of practice varies from state to state. Nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) administer anesthesia and provide care before, during, and after surgical, therapeutic, diagnostic, and obstetrical procedures. Nurse midwives (CNMs) provide care to women, including gynecological exams, family planning services, and prenatal care. Nurse practitioners (NPs) serve as primary and specialty care providers, delivering advanced nursing services to patients and their families. 

Advanced practice registered nurses typically do the following: 

In May 2021, the median annual wage for APRNs was $123,780. Between 2021 and 2031, it is anticipated that employment will grow by 40%. This amounts to around 30,200 expected job openings each year during this time.

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), must have at least a master’s degree in their specialty role. APRNs also must be licensed registered nurses in their state, pass a national certification exam, and have a state APRN license. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare / Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Health Occupations and Health Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm#tab-1 (Visited October 26,2022)



Career of the Week - 10/17/2022


Medical Records Specialist

Medical records specialists compile, process, and maintain patient files. They also may classify and enter patients’ medical information into the healthcare industry's numerical coding system. Medical records specialists have a variety of data entry and recordkeeping tasks. They may gather patients’ medical histories, symptoms, test results, treatments, and other health information and enter the details into electronic health records (EHR) systems. Some workers categorize medical information for purposes such as insurance reimbursement and providing data to clinicians. 

Medical records specialists typically do the following: 

In May 2021, the median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $46,660. Between 2021 and 2031, it is anticipated that employment will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 14,900 expected job openings each year during this time.

A high school diploma or equivalent and experience in a healthcare setting are enough to qualify for some positions, but others may require a postsecondary certificate or an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Biology, Computer Science and Anatomy

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare / Livingston Career & Technical Education Center - Health Occupations and Health Science

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Systems Analysts, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm#tab-1 (visited October 11, 2022). 


Career of the Week - 6/06/2022

Computer Systems Analysts

Computer Systems Analysts working for a specific company find ways that computer systems used at their place of employment can be improved. This may mean redesigning and replacing systems, or finding ways current systems can be improved. Computer systems analysts consult with mangers in the organization to get a handle on how these systems benefit their organization. When and if new systems are installed, it is the computer systems analyst who takes the lead with this process. They also conduct testing to be sure the new system(s) are operating correctly, and provide training as well.

Most often a bachelors degree will be needed to start in this career. A degree having to do with computer science/information is a popular choice for those wanting to enter this field, but not always required as other degree paths are sometimes accepted along with a certain level of skill and knowledge relevant to the job. Computer systems analysts work in various industries and understanding the line of work you are in is also a very important part of the job. 

In May 2021, the median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $99,270. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 47,500 expected job openings each year during this time.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Systems Analysts, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm (visited May 16, 2022). 



Career of the Week - 5/30/2022

Glaziers

Glaziers are specialists when it comes to installing glass products. Items that glaziers install can include windows or skylights in homes or commercial buildings. It can also include installing dividers to break up rooms, or even mirrors. Glaziers must be able to look at blueprints and understand what they are working with. Glaziers must also be able to use various tools to help them install glass products correctly, and they must also know how to cut glass to fit the specifications of the project they are working on. It's important to be okay working from tall heights as glaziers may find this a necessary part of their job.

After receiving a high school diploma or similar, there are a couple paths to becoming a glazier. The first option is to find an apprenticeship, whereas the second option is to learn through on-the-job-training. An apprenticeship for this particular career path normally runs three to four years.  Whether you choose the apprenticeship route or on-the-job-training, many essential skills are learned during this time period. Depending on the state you live in, you may also need a license to do this kind of work. Certification can also be an option and may lead to further job opportunities.

In May, 2021, the median annual wage for those in this career was $47,180. Between 2020 and 2030, a five percent increase in employment for this career is expected. This equates to nearly 6,000 job openings per year during this time period. 

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Glaziers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/glaziers.htm (visited May 16, 2022). 

Career of the Week - 5/23/2022

Drafters

Engineers and architects create designs for various projects. It's then the job of a drafter to turn these designs into technical drawings to be used by many. Drafters complete this task by using computer aided software. These technical drawings provide various information including project dimensions and materials to be used. There are various types of drafters each having a specialization of some kind. From commercial buildings, to medical equipment, to electrical wiring, to road construction projects, and more. There is opportunity to specialize in an area that interests you. 

Drafters spend a majority of their time working in an office, but at times may be found at jobsites working with engineers and others working on the same project. The technical drawings they create using computer aided software can be input into Building Information Modeling Systems, which allows multiple parties to access them and helps different parties see how their portion of the project is working in conjunction with other parts of the project.

Although it is possible to start out in this career by earning a certificate or diploma, most often one will need to earn an associate's degree of applied science. This degree is typically earned in drafting or something similar. Certification can also be an option in this industry to further provide evidence of one's knowledge and skill.  

In May 2021, the median annual wage for drafters was $60,290. During this time period, the highest wages were paid to electrical and electronics drafters. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is expected to decline by 2%, although there is still expected to be over 17,000 job openings each year during this time period. 

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Drafters,

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies


Career of the Week - 5/17/2022

Atmospheric Scientists Including Meteorologists

If all things weather interests you, becoming an Atmospheric Scientist Including Meteorologists may be a great career option for you! There are several types of Atmospheric Scientists. Some focus on patterns involved with weather to help predict what future weather patterns may look like, others focus on climate change, others come up with new ways to collect weather data, yet others work to understand the weather on a specific date that may help answer questions regarding events that occurred. Most all of us are familiar with Broadcast Meteorologists as we have seen them on tv providing weather forecasts and information, although you aren't always required to be an actual Broadcast Meteorologist to report weather on tv. Weather forecasters use electronic equipment and other methods to predict upcoming weather. This information may be provided to the public, or they may work with certain industries who need guidance on upcoming weather for specific activities they are planning. 


The Federal Government (excluding postal service) was the largest employer in 2020 of Atmospheric Scientists Including Meteorologists. The majority of those employed through the Federal Government work for the National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 


To get started in this career you will need a bachelor’s degree in Meteorology or a similar field. If you would like to focus on research an advanced degree is usually required. In May 2021, the median pay for Atmospheric Scientists including Meteorologists was $94,570. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment for these careers will increase by 8%. This amounts to around 1,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Atmospheric Scientists, Including Meteorologists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/atmospheric-scientists-including-meteorologists.htm (visited April 19, 2022). 


Career of the Week - 5/10/2022

Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners

Meeting, Convention, & Event planners handle all aspects of planning different types of events including corporate, government, and social events. They work with several parties to plan these events and are usually planning multiple events at once. Those in this career must explore different venues that are available to best suite the needs of their clients. In this role negotiation is involved when it comes to booking the venues, catering service, lodging, etc... Meeting, Convention and Event Planners may also be involved with planning additional special events or booking guest speakers.

In addition to planning events in their entirety, Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners usually coordinate some of the activities during the events, and are also the ones who must ensure that clients are happy with the outcome of the events. In addition, they must ensure that all suppliers and services are paid for.

Most often a bachelor's degree is going to be required in this career. Experience in the hospitality industry or in event planning can prove valuable as well. There are also a number of certifications available within the industry that can further enhance your career.

In May 2021, the median annual wage for Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners was $49,470. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to grow by 18%! This equates to around 16,400 job openings each year during this time period.  

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/meeting-convention-and-event-planners.htm (visited April 19, 2022). 

Career of the Week - 5/03/2022

Training & Development Specialists

Employees need to continually improve their skills and increase their knowledge. Training & Development Specialists are charged with the task of putting together these training programs and administering them. There is opportunity to be hired as a training and development specialist in almost all industries. Not only do those in this career provide the training and/or training materials to employees (depending on the format the training will be delivered), but they must also determine the training needs of the employees and how best to provide these - whether through lecture, interactive training, an online option, etc...  The training programs must also be evaluated to ensure effectiveness and the training and development specialist can assist with this. Budgeting and cost analysis are also part of the duties included, as well as equipment set-up, when necessary.

This is a career where you are constantly working with others. It is imperative that someone in this career is able to give presentations and be the lead person in a roomful of people or in a virtual setting.

Typically a bachelor's degree is going to be required for this position as well as related work experience. In certain situations employers may consider candidates who do not possess a bachelor's degree if their related work experience qualifies them for the job. 

In May 2021 the median annual wage for training and development specialists was $61,570. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment in this career will increase by 11%. This equates to over 35,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Training and Development Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/training-and-development-specialists.htm (visited April 19, 2022).

Career of the Week - 4/25/2022

Preschool & Childcare Center Directors

Becoming a preschool or childcare center director requires one to oversee all aspects of a facility's operations. This includes supervising staff members, overseeing day to day operations, implementing education programs, hiring new staff, budgeting, professional development for staff, and more. 

Opportunities exist to work in schools, independently owned preschool and childcare centers, or centers that are part of a franchise. In 2020 the largest employer of preschool and childcare center directors was that of child daycare services. Most often directors will work in an office, but will meet with parents, students and staff as is necessary. If the center offers before or after school care, additional or longer hours could be required of those in this position. Preschool and childcare directors should have good communication skills as they will regularly be speaking with parents and staff. They should also possess good leadership skills as they are responsible for making sure regulations and rules are followed at their center. 

Typically a bachelor's degree is going to be required to be hired in this career, but there may be times where this will not be required. Experience working in early childhood education is usually required, and licensure may also be required depending on the state or employer you work for.

In May 2020, $47,310 was the median annual wage for preschool & childcare center directors. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for this career will increase by 11%. This amounts to around 5,300 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Preschool and Childcare Center Directors, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/preschool-and-childcare-center-directors.htm (visited April 19, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Center - Early Childhood Education program


Career of the Week - 4/18/2022

Environmental Scientists & Specialists

There are different types of Environmental Scientists & Specialists and their area of focus and responsibility can vary depending upon this. Overall, those in this field are working to protect the environment along with certain aspects of our health. The government imposes mandatory environmental and safety regulations to help with this.

As an environmental scientist or specialist you may find yourself collecting and analyzing data, creating plans to clean up pollution, releasing guidance to the public surrounding a possible environmental risk, or making recommendations as how to best protect the environment. Confirming environmental regulations in place are followed is another job duty when working specifically for the government. It is also possible to be employed through a consulting firm and consult project owners to ensure they are complying with any required regulations during the course of a construction project. 

Whether you specialize on climate, health factors affecting humans, or cleaning up contaminated sites, you are working to bring forth solutions to prevent environmental issues, or address those that have occurred.

For those wanting to enter this career, a bachelor's degree in environmental science or a related major, is the most popular route to take. If one desires to move up the ladder, including supervising others or being responsible for additional duties, they would want to consider obtaining a masters degree as well. Certification is also an option for those in the field.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for those in this career was $73,230. Between 2020 and 2030 it is expected that employment will grow by 8%. This amounts to around 9,400 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Environmental Scientists and Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/environmental-scientists-and-specialists.htm (visited April 08, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Biology, Chemistry, & Physics

Wilson Talent Center - BioScience Careers Program


Career of the Week - 4/11/2022

Customer Service Representative


You will find customer service representatives in the banking industry, utilities industry, retail industry, and almost every other industry out there. Being a customer service representative  involves talking with customers via phone, email, video call, text, as well as in person in certain industries. Customer service representatives provide assistance with various things depending on what business they are in. This may include: listening to complaints customers have; answering questions; and providing assistance with prior orders or new orders. Customer service representatives may have to document conversations with customers, or at times transfer customers to management to provide further assistance. 


The majority of customer service representatives work full time, but part time work may also be an option. Weekends, holidays, and after hours can be required in this position. It is imperative to have good communication and interpersonal skills if you wish to be a customer service representative. Great listening skills and patience can further help those in this career. 


A high school diploma is usually all it takes to get started in this career, although some people in this position do possess a postsecondary degree. Typically on the job training will be provided to those entering this career. The time frame can vary depending on the industry you are joining. In certain industries a license may be necessary to do the job. 


In May 2020, the annual median hourly wage for customer service representatives was $17.23. In 2020 the two largest employers of customer service representatives were retail trade and insurance carriers and related activities. Around 361,700 job openings are expected each year between 2020 and 2030.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Customer Service Representatives,

At  https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/customer-service-representatives.htm (visited March 18, 2022).


Career of the Week - 4/04/2022

Fire Inspectors & Fire Investigators

Fire Inspectors spend time in various buildings to determine if the buildings possess any sort of fire hazard. This can include apartment buildings, industrial buildings, arenas, etc... They also ensure that fire codes, whether federal, local, or state, are complied with. Another career opportunity exists as a fire investigator. Fire investigators are called upon after an explosion or fire to determine the cause as well as where the fire or explosion started.

Fire inspectors and fire investigators have many duties, a few of which are described here. Fire inspectors find themselves working with building developers to make sure their building plans adhere to current fire codes. Fire alarms and other fire protection equipment must be tested to ensure they are working properly. It is the job of a fire inspector to conduct this necessary testing. Fire inspectors also educate others on fire safety through educational programs they organize.

Fire investigators meet with witnesses to gather any information they can offer. They also collect evidence from the scene and send it to the appropriate place(s) to be tested. Fire investigators must also be ready to testify in court if necessary.

A high school diploma is needed to get into these positions, but most fire inspectors and investigators have previously worked as firefighters. Thus, many have received training applicable to these positions and will receive further training in investigation and inspection while actually in these positions.

In May 2020, the annual median wage for those in these positions was $64,610. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment for those in these careers will increase by 9%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Fire Inspectors, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/fire-inspectors-and-investigators.htm (visited March 13, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Firefighter Program & Emergency Medical Technician Program

Career of the Week - 3/21/2022

Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights

The work of Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights involves maintaining, troubleshooting problems, making repairs as necessary, and moving industrial equipment and machinery. The type of equipment and machinery worked on can include conveyor systems, packaging equipment, as well as production equipment. Industrial Machinery Mechanics are more involved in the troubleshooting of potential problems with machinery before it actually becomes an issue. It is common for them to perform diagnostic testing of the equipment and machinery. Machinery Maintenance Workers tend the make the repairs after a problem or potential problem is identified by the Industrial Machinery Mechanic, as well as maintain and clean equipment. Millwrights do make smaller repairs to machinery, but they are responsible for moving the location of machinery, which requires dismantling entire machines and reassembling them. Many tools are used to complete the various tasks involved in these careers. These can include socket wrenches, lathes, drill presses, lasers, and even cranes and trucks. 

A high school degree or equivalent is needed to get started on this path. A year or more of on-the-job training is typically provided to those looking to become an industrial machinery mechanic or machinery maintenance worker. Two-year associate's degrees are also available in industrial maintenance. For those who wish to become millwrights, apprenticeships are the path taken to accomplish this. These typically take three to four years to complete.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for industrial machinery mechanics, machinery maintenance workers, and millwrights was $54,920. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these careers will increase by 19%! This amounts to over 56,000 openings anticipated each year during this time period. 

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/industrial-machinery-mechanics-and-maintenance-workers-and-millwrights.htm (visited March 14, 2022). 

Career of the Week - 3/13/2022

Writer or Author

Choosing a career as a writer or author does not automatically mean you will be writing books. Writers and authors provide content for a variety of different media sources. Websites, television shows, magazines, blogs, theatre shows, etc... are all included! Depending on your focus area, research may be necessary to complete your work. You could also find yourself working with clients to develop advertising slogans, or  interviewing those featured in your writing to gain an accurate account of the details you will be sharing. Writers and authors rely on editors to help them convey the story or information they are writing in a clear and easy to understand manner. 

Having a career as a writer or author provides the opportunity for self-employment or working on a freelance basis. This provides the benefit to be able to select the projects you take on, but it could also mean constant searching for new work projects as other ones are ending. One benefit of being a writer or author is that you have the capability to be able to work from pretty much anywhere, as long as you have access to a computer. Sometimes though, more of this kind of work is found in the larger markets including the New York area, as well as California and Washington D.C. 

An English degree or a degree in journalism or communications can get one started in this career. Those aspiring to be writers or authors can get a head start by interning in the industry, writing for a school newspaper, or working in the radio or news industry. Another way to attain experience and possibly a paid project before earning a degree is to create a blog. 

In May 2020 the median annual wage of writers and authors was $67,120. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that this career will see a 9% growth rate. This amounts to over $15,000 job openings that are anticipated each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Writers and Authors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/writers-and-authors.htm (visited March 04, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - English and writing classes


Career of the Week - 3/07/2022

Medical Assistants

You can find medical assistants working in different types of doctors offices, out-patient clinics, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Medical assistants can be involved in administrative type of work, such as obtaining and documenting health and medical information and scheduling future appointments for patients. They can also be involved in clinical work, which can include taking vital signs of patients, giving injections, drawing blood, putting dressings on wounds, etc... Those employed through a specific type of medical office may be referred to as Specialized Medical Assistants. Their duties can be specific to the type of facility they work in - this includes those working for podiatrists and those working in ophthalmology or optometry offices.

The majority of medical assistants go through an education program which provides them with a diploma or certificate. The average time to complete this is usually one year or less. Two-year programs that result in an associate's degree are also available. Some will enter the field with only a high school diploma and will receive training once in the position. Although certification is usually not required, it is an option. Candidates who wish to receive a certification must be eligible either by work experience and/or completing a formal program, and must pass an exam.

In 2020 most medical assistants were employed through physician offices. In May 2020 the median annual wage for medical assistants was $35,850. Between 2020 and 2030 employment for this occupation is expected to increase by 18%! This amounts to over 100,000 job openings projected each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Medical Assistants, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm (visited February 13, 2022).


If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Biology classes, Anatomy classes, Chemistry classes, & possibly Business & Computer classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations & Emergency Medical Technician

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations & Medical Assistant


Career of the Week - 2/28/2022

Purchasing Managers, Buyers and Purchasing Agents

Products & services that companies purchase to resell or use themselves are purchased by those referred to as Buyers and Purchasing Agents. Individuals in these roles are responsible for finding the right supplier(s) to do business with. This involves evaluating everything from pricing to delivery times, to the quality of products that will be purchased. Once a buyer or purchasing agent negotiates a contract, they must then oversee the contract to be sure that the terms of the contract are being followed. When unacceptable service or products are an issue, buyers and purchasing agents are in charge of meeting with those involved and determining a solution to correct the issue. 

Purchasing Managers oversee buyers and purchasing agents and develop a plan for the work they will be responsible for. They also develop policies that buyers and purchasing agents must follow when working with suppliers and vendors.

A high school degree may suffice with smaller companies, but most often a bachelor's degree will be required to get into one of these careers. Areas of study can vary from business and finance, to a focus on agriculture if you will be dealing with farm products.  On the job training is usually provided for those stepping into these careers and certifications are available. To get into the role of a purchasing manager, several years of experience in a buying or purchasing role is typically required.

In 2020, the manufacturing industry was the top employer of both buyers and purchasing agents and purchasing managers. In May of 2020, the median annual wage for buyers and purchasing agents was $66,690 and $125,940 for purchasing managers. 

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Purchasing Managers, Buyers, and Purchasing Agents, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/purchasing-managers-buyers-and-purchasing-agents.htm (visited February 04, 2022). 


If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II, Retail Management & Operations, Economics, Agriculture courses if interested in dealing with farm products

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Agricultural courses if interested in dealing with farm products


Career of the Week - 2/21/2022

Elevator and Escalator Installers and Repairers

When elevators, escalators, moving walkways, or lifts need repairs or general maintenance, elevator and escalator installers and repairers are the experts. To be able to successfully complete their job, they must be able to read blue prints to understand how each different system is set up. Their jobs involve troubleshooting malfunctioning equipment, repairing and replacing defective parts, inspecting equipment to ensure it complies with safety requirements, testing new equipment, and documenting and recording all repairs and work performed, in addition to other duties. Protective equipment including hard hats, safety glasses, and harnesses are a must in this occupation, as there is the possibility for injuries to happen. In 2020, eighty-five percent of elevator and escalator installers and repairers were employed by building equipment contractors.

To get started in this career, most often a high school diploma will be required. Apprenticeships are the path that nearly everyone gets their start in this career, and typically this takes four years to complete. It's most likely you will also need to be licensed to work in this career. Their is also the opportunity to become certified through different associations in the industry, as well as opportunity for advancement in the field with additional training.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for elevator and escalator installers and repairers was $88,540, with the government being the highest paying industry at $96,530. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that the occupation will grow by 6%! This means there will be around 2,500 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Elevator and Escalator Installers and Repairers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/elevator-installers-and-repairers.htm (visited February 07, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Math, Physics

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design, Construction

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 2/14/2022

Occupational Health & Safety Specialists and Technicians

Occupational health & safety specialists and technicians visit various places of employment to evaluate health and safety aspects. They may conduct different tests in the workplace, inspect machinery and equipment, and document different work practices. This is all done to ensure a safe environment for employees, to protect the environment, and protect the health & wellbeing of all. After inspecting a place of employment, a report must be generated. If it is found that there is a need to provide training programs on safety in the workplace, or provide improved workplace procedures to help workers stay safe on the job, occupational health & safety specialists and technicians take on this responsibility.

Offices and factories are a couple places you will find occupational health & safety specialists and technicians working. Many times travel is involved, and weekend time, as well as time outside of normal business hours may be required. To become an occupational health & safety specialist typically requires a bachelor's degree. To start a career as an occupational health & safety technician may only require training received on the job, or earning a certificate or two-year degree. There are also opportunities to earn certifications in the industry.  

In May 2020, $76,340 was the median annual wage for occupational health & safety specialists. During that same time period it was $53,340 for occupational health & safety technicians. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these careers will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 9,600 openings each year during this time period. 

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-health-and-safety-specialists-and-technicians.htm (visited January 28, 2022). 

If you are interested in these careers, consider taking the following while in high school!

English, Mathematics, chemistry, biology & physics


Career of the Week - 2/07/2022

Mathematicians & Statisticians

Mathematicians and statisticians work to solve problems in several different sectors by collecting information and analyzing it. Mathematicians and statisticians must decide what information must be collected that will provide answers or information being sought, and they must decide what collection method or methods will be used to attain the needed information. Surveys, experiments, and opinion polls are a few ways information is collected. The collected information must be analyzed and findings are then communicated to the party seeking the information. Many fields use data analysis to make decisions. These include the government, healthcare, business, and education. The information collected and studied can directly impact which products may be developed, decisions the government makes, or used to understand which treatment options may be working against a disease.

In 2020, the majority of mathematicians worked for the federal government, while statisticians were more spread out through different employment sectors. Most positions for mathematicians and statisticians require at least a master's degree, but those with only a bachelor's degree will typically find some opportunities as well. Yet other opportunities or advanced level positions may require a doctoral degree. Taking courses in other fields of study can further provide an advantage when seeking to work in a specific industry.

In May 2020, $110,860 was the median annual wage for mathematicians. During that same time period it was $92,270 for statisticians. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for these careers is anticipated to grow by 33%.  This amounts to over 5,000 openings expected each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: 

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mathematicians and Statisticians,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/mathematicians-and-statisticians.htm (visited February 13, 2022). 

If you are interested in these careers, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Many math classes.


Career of the Week - 1/31/2022

Food Service Managers

Businesses or institutions that prepare and serve food & beverages need someone to oversee their operations. This is the job of a food service manager. Many responsibilities fall under this role. These includes interviewing and hiring new employees, ordering food and necessary supplies required to run the business, confirming the establishment is in compliance with food safety and health requirements, determining employee schedules, and verifying that the business is profitable, among other duties. 

A few places you can find food service managers include restaurants, school & office cafeterias, and hotels. It is common for those in this career to work outside of normal business hours. Weekends and holidays are often part of a food service manager's schedule.

Many times experience in the industry and a high school diploma are all it takes to get going in this career. Some employers may prefer a bachelors degree and there are a few options for this. Restaurant and Hospitality Management is one degree available, while Institutional Food Service Management is another. Business is another degree that can be beneficial to those wanting a career as a food service manager.  Associate degree programs through community colleges and other institutions are also an option.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for food service managers was $56,590. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to increase by 15%. This amounts to over 41,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Food Service Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/food-service-managers.htm (visited January 17, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II, Retail Management & Operations, Nutrition & Culinary Explorations

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Culinary Arts 

Wilson Talent Center - Career Start & Culinary Arts & Hospitality 


Career of the Week - 1/24/2022

Electrical & Electronics Repairers & Installers

Repairing, installing and maintaining different electrical equipment is the job of electrical & electronics repairers and installers. There are a wide range of different types of electrical & electronics repairers and installers. Some focus on the commercial and industrial market, while others focus on such things as electric motors and power tools. There are opportunities to specialize in transportation equipment or motor vehicles, as well as powerhouse and substations. The industries where career opportunities exist, range from telecommunications, to utilities, transportation, manufacturing, and more. 

In these careers, you will find yourself working with customers to address equipment needing repair. It is your responsibility to diagnose the problem and do what is necessary to fix the issue - whether this involves repairing or replacing part of the equipment. After a repair is made the equipment must be tested to insure it is working properly, as well that it meets the requirements of the employer. It is also your responsibility to document the repairs that were made, components that were replaced, and the amount of time it took, etc...

A high school education at minimum is required to jump into this industry, but attending an electronics program through a technical school or community college may provide the necessary training to be able to specialize within the industry. Work experience and apprenticeships are also valuable to bring when entering this career. Training is often provided through employers on specific equipment, and new employees usually work on developing their skills by working alongside a technician that has been around for awhile.

In 2020, the largest employer of electrical and electronics repairers and installers was the manufacturing industry, with the utility industry following after. In May of 2020, the median annual wage for electrical and electronics installers and repairers was $62,020. Those who worked on powerhouses, substations, and relays were the highest paid during this time. Between 2020 and 2030, there is expected to be a two percent increase in employment for electrical and electronics installers and repairers. This equates to around 9,600 openings per year during this time.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/electrical-and-electronics-installers-and-repairers.htm (visited January 18, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Energy Technology Program, Robotics/Mechatronics, Automotive Technology

Wilson Talent Center - Automotive Technology, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 1/17/2022

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work with several parties to come up with ways to bring interest to the products or services to be sold. From researching who the customers will be, to knowing what kind of budget they are working with, to choosing by which means to advertise through, there is much planning involved in the process. Other types of activities involved may include, hiring others to assist with marketing, meeting with clients to discuss marketing strategies, and recommending pricing of products or services. 

Specifically, advertising managers focus on drumming up product interest with those they believe are potential customers. Promotions managers focus on adding incentives to their programs for those who purchase the advertised products or services. Marketing managers are focused on determining what the demand will be for a company's products or services, and helping them determine how to gain the most market share.

Creativity is an important quality among those who may want to get into this career field, as new and creative ideas are always needed to bring attention to new products or services. Interpersonal skills are another important quality. Those in these roles tend to work with others from outside their organization, and must also be able to work successfully with their own team.

To be able to attain one of these positions, most often a bachelor's degree will be required. Most will also come into these management positions with work experience in the field. Degrees in advertising or journalism are options for those who wish to be advertising managers. A business degree or related degree is recommended for marketing managers. Internships are also a great way to gain knowledge and experience in the field before jumping in.

In May 2022, the median annual wage for advertising and promotions managers was $133,460, and $142,170 for marketing managers. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these three careers will increase by 10%! Over 31,000 openings each year are projected during this time period!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm (visited January 17, 2022). 

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing 1 & Marketing 2

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Marketing 1 & Marketing 2 (at FHS)

Wilson Talent Center - Business & Risk Management


Career of the Week - 1/10/2022

Librarians or Library Media Specialists

Conducting research and helping others find information are two job duties of librarians and library media specialists. Different types of librarians and library media specialists exist. These include academic librarians, public librarians, administrative service librarians, school librarians, and special librarians, among others. Librarians and library media specialists handle the organization of the library so patrons have easy access to the books or information they are searching for. They are also responsible for bringing new books and materials into the library and must conduct research on the items. Different programs are often available through public libraries for different patrons. This can include story time for the younger audience, as well as book clubs for older children and adults.

Depending on the type of librarian you are, you could be working in a school, local public library, or postsecondary educational institution. Others who employ special librarians, also called information librarians, include private businesses and government agencies, among other organizations. An additional degree may be required of those in these positions. 

To become a librarian, you will most often need a masters degree in library science (MLS). Different schools may refer to this degree under different names including, "Master of Information Studies." No specific undergraduate degree is usually required to enter into a masters program and program length can range from a year to two years. Information covered in such graduate degree programs usually include learning internet search techniques, various research methods and strategies, as well as learning about online reference systems. Different job titles and places of employment may have additional requirements to become a librarian or library media specialist.

In May 2020, the annual median wage for librarians and library media specialists was $60,820. Between 2020 an 2030, employment for this career is expected to grow by 9%. This amounts to over 15,000 job openings anticipated each year during this time period. 

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Librarians and Library Media Specialists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm (visited December 21, 2021). 

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

Literature courses including advanced placement courses


Career of the Week - 1/03/2022

Clinical Laboratory Technologists & Technicians

Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians, also known as medical laboratory scientists, can be found working in hospitals, laboratories, as well as doctor’s offices. Their jobs involve running various tests on bodily fluids, samples of tissue, as well as other substances. This testing requires utilizing equipment such as microscopes, cell counters, and automated & computerized equipment, which allows for multiple tests to run at once. Clinical laboratory technologists & technicians also update patient records with their findings and communicate them back to the physicians and other healthcare professionals who ordered the tests. 


Typically technicians will perform more of the routine types of tests that may use automated equipment, whereas technologists may be working on more complex and manual types of tests. Both technologists and technicians are able to specialize in a particular area. From working specifically with blood, to identifying different types of bacteria, or examining cells to identify if anything abnormal is present, there are several options to specialize.


Becoming a clinical laboratory technologist will most often require you to obtain a bachelor's degree in medical technology or a related field. An associates degree or post secondary certificate is usually needed to work as a clinical laboratory technician. A Clinical Laboratory Science Degree is one such program offered for those who wish to become technicians. Both technologists & technicians may need to be licensed depending on the state they work in.


In May 2020, the median annual wage of clinical laboratory technologists and technicians was $54,180. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for these professions is expected to grow by 11%! This equates to over 25,000 job openings each year during this time period!


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/clinical-laboratory-technologists-and-technicians.htm (visited December 21, 2021). 


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Chemistry, Biology & Math courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program

Wilson Talent Center - Bioscience careers program


Career of the Week - 12/13/2021

Veterinary Technologists & Technicians

Veterinary technologists & technicians work under the direction of veterinarians and conduct medical tests including laboratory and diagnostic tests, in order to determine medical diagnoses for illnesses and injuries animals may be facing.

Being a veterinary technologist or technician involves such duties as: providing that initial first care for a sick or injured animal, preparing for surgery, administering medicines & vaccines, observing animal behavior, keeping patient records, and communicating with the owners of the animals. You can find veterinary technologist and technicians both in research related jobs, as well as in animal medical offices. Either way they are working under the direction of veterinarians or scientists, depending on the area of employment.

To become a veterinary technologist or technician you will need to complete a program in veterinary technology. Becoming a technologist typically requires a four-year degree, while becoming a technician only requires a two-year degree. One will most likely need to become licensed or registered depending on the state you work in. Typically this involves passing an exam.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for these occupations was $36,260.  Between 2020 and 2030 it's anticipated that growth for these occupations will be 15%. This amounts to around 10,400 jobs openings per year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Veterinary Technologists and Technicians,at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm (visited November 24, 2021). 


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Biology & Other Science Courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Agricultural Science /Botany / Zoology

Wilson Talent Center - Bioscience Careers


Career of the Week - 12/06/2021

Court Reporters & Simultaneous Captioners


Court reporters spend their time capturing the exact words spoken at legal proceedings, as this is a requirement of these proceedings. This includes administrative hearings, depositions, trials, etc. Judges and lawyers may utilize these records after the fact, or court reporters may be asked to read back part of what they have recorded during such proceedings. Court reporters not only capture exact words spoken, but also record gestures and/or actions taken during these proceedings.


Simultaneous captioners provide similar services, although outside of courtrooms and legal proceedings. Their services are often provided to the deaf or hard of hearing. They transcribe spoken words at such places as press conferences and doctors appointments. Simultaneous captioners are not always required to be at the appointment or event that they are transcribing - due to being able to connect virtually. Other simultaneous captioners provide what is known as “closed captions” for television programs. Both of these occupations capture speech, gestures, and actions using different devices and methods.


Certificate programs as well as associate degree programs are offered at some community colleges. To get started in one of these careers you will most likely need one of the two. Oftentimes, one must also be licensed or become certified through a professional association.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for these careers was $61,660. Between 2020 and 2030, it is expected that employment of these careers will increase by 3%. This amounts to around 2,100 job openings each year during this time.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Court Reporters and Simultaneous Captioners, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/court-reporters.htm (visited November 24, 2021).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - English classes


Career of the Week - 11/29/2021

Urban & Regional Planners


Urban and regional planners help determine how land will be used in cities and towns where buildings need to be updated, there is a growth in the population, or when a community is being created.


Urban and regional planners meet with several people during the course of their work. Public officials, the public, and developers are all involved with the work they do. Urban and regional planners not only review plans submitted by developers, they must then present these plans to communities and planning committees. Those in this career must be aware of government policies when it comes to land use, and must be up to date on current zoning laws and regulations affecting the environment. They will ultimately provide a recommendation on whether a proposal should be approved or denied. In 2020 the majority (70%) of urban and regional planners were employed by local governments - excluding education and hospitals. 


To be able to get into this career, most often one will need a master’s degree from an urban or regional planning program. If you don’t have a master’s degree but hold a bachelor’s degree, you could become employed as a junior planner or assistant. Internships are a great way to gain experience in this field and at times, experience will be required to attain a job.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for urban and regional planners was $75,950. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for this occupation will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 3,700 job openings annually during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Urban and Regional Planners, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/urban-and-regional-planners.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Economics

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 11/22/2021

Flight Attendant


Securing the safety and comfort of passengers on an airplane is the job of a flight attendant. Flight attendants provide standard services such as selling food and beverages, they also inspect emergency equipment prior to a flight, as well as ensure passengers know how to utilize the safety equipment if needed. Flight attendants must be sure that all passengers are following company policies and federal law when it comes to safety protocols. 


Before take off, pilots may meet with the flight attendants to go over any important information about the upcoming flight. Beyond greeting & assisting passengers, as well as advising, demonstrating, and inspecting safety equipment, flight attendants are trained to handle emergencies. These could include fire hazards, assisting passengers with evacuation when necessary, handling disruptive behavior, and administering first aid. If any issue of the kind did occur during the flight, it must be documented by way of submitting a report.


Flight attendants schedules can vary. Flight attendants may work outside normal business hours as flights are around the clock and include holidays. 


Usually a high school diploma is required to get started in this career. Employers provide the necessary training and it is a requirement that all flight attendants are certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as well as pass other screening tests. If you are working on an international flight, it may required that you are fluent in another language.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for flight attendants was $59,050. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 30%! This amounts to around 17,600 job openings per year during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Flight Attendants,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/flight-attendants.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!


High School - Emergency Response Readiness - Foreign language classes


Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Care Occupations (first year course)


Wilson Talent Center - Health Foundations (first year course)


Career of the Week - 11/15/2021

Sales Engineers

Sales Engineers sell complicated scientific and technological products and services, such as manufacturing equipment or IT systems, to businesses. Sales engineers must not only understand their products and how they work, they must also be able to communicate these aspects to customers through presentations. At times, products will need to be modified for specific customers. Sales engineers will work with businesses to determine what problem they need solved, and then determine how their product needs to be modified in order to solve that problem. At the end of the day, sales engineers must bring in sales, therefore, they must build relationships with customers, prove to their clients that their products are superior to others’ products, and secure sales orders. 


Most often a bachelor’s degree in engineering or something related to engineering will help one get into this career. Although at times this may not be required if one has sales experience or has a degree in business or science. Typically students pick an area of engineering to specialize in - this can range from civil engineering to electrical engineering to biomedical engineering, and more. After earning a degree, most often one will need to go through sales training before getting out in the field and being able to sell. An important quality for those in this career is having strong interpersonal skills as sales engineers are constantly working with customers and must be able to present their information clearly and effectively. 


In May of 2020, the median annual wage for sales engineers was $108,830. Between 2020 and 2030 employment is anticipated to grow 8%. This amounts to around 7,300 annual job openings during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Sales Engineers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/sales-engineers.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing I & Marketing II


Livingston Career & Technical - Business & Marketing program, Engineering program, Computer Network Engineering program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Wilson Talent Center -Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 11/08/2021

Social & Community Service Managers


Supporting public well-being by running programs and services intended to make a positive impact on those served, is the job of social and community service managers. 


Social & community service managers typically work to determine which programs are needed in their community. They also work to make people aware of these programs, and to obtain the needed funding. They evaluate programs in place to gauge what kind of impact they are making, and recommend improvements and changes where needed.


Most often a bachelor’s degree along with experience is needed to get into this career. In some instances a master’s degree is needed. Gaining experience by working as a social worker is one way to move into this career. Good communication skills are a must for those in this career, as well as good managerial skills, as you will be responsible to handle budgets for the programs in place and handle various issues that come up.


In May of 2020, the median annual wage for social and community service managers was $69,600. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for these careers will increase by 15%! This amounts to nearly 18,300 job openings each year during this time period!


Source of information and to learn more, please visit:


Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social and Community Service Managers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/social-and-community-service-managers.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School Classes - Psychology 1, Psychology 2, & AP Psychology

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Education program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 11/01/2021

Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts, & Testers

If you would enjoy spending your time designing computer applications and programs, then you may want to consider a career as a software developer. In this career you will determine what it is that needs to be accomplished for those using the software. You will design entire programs and how every piece works together. At times you may also recommend that customers upgrade their software.

If you would prefer to test applications & programs to look for flaws and problems, then a career as a quality assurance analyst or tester might be the better option. In this career you will provide feedback on any issues or flaws you come across when conducting testing, using the systems you designed for that purpose.

Receiving a bachelor's degree in computer and information technology is the most common way to get started in one of these careers. Related degrees such as those in math or engineering can also provide a pathway to one of these careers. It is important for those going into these careers to have a substantial amount of knowledge when it comes to programming computers. 

In May 2020, the median annual wage for those having a career as a software developer, quality assurance analyst, and tester was $110,140. Between 2020 and 2030 a growth of 22% in employment for these careers has been projected. This equates to around $189,200 job openings each year during this time frame. 

Source of information and to learn more about this career, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts, and Testers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/software-developers.htm (visited October 28, 2021). 

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School Classes - Math classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Computer Programming, Computer Network Engineering, Engineering - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Programming & Mobile Applications, Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/25/2021

Carpenter

There are several types of specialized carpenters, but in general, carpenters construct and install various structures and frameworks, while also making repairs when needed. Carpenters also spend time installing various fixtures including windows and cabinets. Carpenters must be able to read blueprints to do their job. It is important that they also follow the plans that have been laid out for the buildings they are working on. Carpenters use tools like levels, sanders, and nail guns to do their jobs. Heavier machinery such as cranes may be needed for larger jobs. 

To get your career started as a carpenter, you will typically need a high school diploma. Most often training is accomplished on the job or through an apprenticeship program, although associate programs for carpentry are available at some schools. If you are interested in an apprenticeship program you should be able to find these through contractor associations and/or unions. Once you are a carpenter, there are certifications available, based on specialty, that may help you advance your career or lead to further job opportunities.

In 2020, the majority of carpenters (26%) were self-employed, followed closely by those employed by residential building constructors (22%). 

In May 2020, the median annual wage for carpenters was $49,520. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that careers in carpentry will increase by 2%. This equates to nearly 89,300 annual job openings during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Carpenters,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/carpenters.htm (visited October 05, 2021). 


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Mathematics classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Construction Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/18/2021

Audiologist

An audiologist is a specialist when it comes to diagnosing and treating hearing, balance, and other ear related issues. Not only do they examine and provide treatment for patients, they also help patients manage these kinds of issues. For example, one way they do this is by counseling patients and family members on different ways to communicate with those who have hearing loss. Lip reading is one suggestion they may give, along with utilizing technology to communicate as well. Fitting patients with hearing aids and monitoring their progress is another task audiologists perform. If treatment plans need to be modified, it is the job of an audiologist to determine and implement the necessary changes. Audiologists also spend time doing research to help them understand the causes and treatment options for hearing loss and balance issues. When trying to diagnose patients, audiologists use different devices including computers and audiometers to test for balance and hearing issues, including the extent of any hearing loss.

It is important for those going into this field to have good communication skills as they will be consistently working with patients and their families, and possibly other health providers as part of a team. It is also important that those in this field show compassion, as patients may be upset about their situation.

Audiologists hold a doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D). This is a four year program completed after a bachelor's degree is earned. It is also a requirement that audiologists are licensed. Specific requirements for licensure can vary by state. There are also options to earn a certificate or credentials through different organizations in the industry. 

In May 2020, the median annual wage for audiologists was $81,030. In 2020, the largest employer of audiologists were offices of physicians. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that employment for this career will grow by 16%.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Audiologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/audiologists.htm (visited October 05, 2021). 


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Anatomy, Physiology, Physics classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/11/2021

Physician Assistant


A career as a physician assistant involves providing medical care to patients as part of a team of doctors, while also working under their supervision. Responsibilities that physician assistants can take on vary based on the state they work in. Most physician assistants conduct examinations of patients, diagnose illnesses and injuries, prescribe medication, order appropriate testing, and educate patients on health conditions and proper care. 


In 2020, the majority of physician assistants were employed by doctors offices, followed by hospitals. There is opportunity throughout the medical field for physician assistants. Whether it is with a primary care provider, in emergency medicine, surgery, or other, you will find physician assistants in many areas of medicine.


To become a physician assistant you will most often need to have a master’s degree from an accredited program and become licensed in your state. It’s also advantageous to have experience working with patients when applying to graduate school.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for physician assistants was $115,390. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to increase by 31%. This equates to around 12,200 annual job openings during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Physician Assistants, 

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physician-assistants.htm (visited October 05, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Human Anatomy & Physiology, Emergency Response Readiness, 


Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program & Emergency Medical Technician Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare programs - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/04/2021

Machinists and Tool & Die Makers

As a Machinist or Tool & Die Maker, you will be involved in producing metal parts, instruments, or tools through the operation of mechanically and computer controlled equipment. 

Machinists are specifically involved in producing precision metal parts through the use of different machines. Lathes, grinders, and milling machines comprise some of the machines used. Many times both manual and CNC machinery is used. While machinists can produce large amounts of certain products, at times, you will also find them producing small quantities of unique items. In addition, they may repair or make new parts for current machinery. 

Tool & Die Makers are the ones who produce the machinery that will eventually produce the precision metal parts. The machines produced can form and cut metal as well as other materials. Computer Aided Design (CAD) is also used by tool & die makers.

You can typically become a machinist with a high school degree and expect to learn on the job, but becoming a tool & die maker may require additional coursework. Apprenticeships are an option, as well as two-year technical schools or community college programs. Learning to read blue prints and how to program computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines, are typically taught through the two year educational programs.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for machinists was $45,840, and at the same time the median annual wage for tool & die makers was $54,760. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for the occupation of machinists will grow by 7%, while employment of tool & die makers will grow by 2%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Machinists and Tool and Die Makers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/machinists-and-tool-and-die-makers.htm (visited September 08, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math courses

Livingston CTE - Manufacturing program & Engineering/CAD program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Precision Machining Technology program & Engineering Technologies program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 9/27/2021

Probation Officers & Correctional Treatment Specialists

Providing social services to those in custody, or those on parole or probation, is the job of a Probation Officer & Correctional Treatment Specialist. The social services provided are to assist in the rehabilitation of these individuals. Depending on your specific job title your role may vary, but some of the job duties involved are: evaluating these individuals in order to determine what course of rehabilitation would be best, interviewing friends and family of the offender to gauge if progress is being made, administering drug tests, as well as testifying in court.

The different types of probation officers & correctional treatment specialists include: probation officers, parole officers, pretrial services officers, and correctional treatment specialists. Probation officers specifically work with offenders who have been put on probation instead of serving time in prison. Parole officers assist those released from prison and are now on parole, as they re-enter back into society. Pretrial service officers provide investigative services before a defendant's trial date. They must provide a recommendation to the judge as to whether it is safe to release the defendant prior to their trial date. Correctional treatment specialists work on the rehabilitation plans for those on probation or parole. They may assist with job placement & housing, as well as make sure the individual they are working with understands the condition and terms of their release.

Most often a bachelor's degree is going to be required to get into one of these careers. A degree in criminal justice can be one avenue. Additional competency exams and testing is usually required. It is also possible to receive additional training to be able to specialize in working with a certain group. These can include domestic violence offenders, juvenile offenders, or substance abusers.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists was $55,690. Between 2020 and 2030 these careers are anticipated to grow by four percent.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/probation-officers-and-correctional-treatment-specialists.htm (visited September 08, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Criminal Justice Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 9/20/2021

Property, Real Estate, & Community Association Managers

There are many tasks involved when it comes to taking care of residential, commercial, and industrial properties. Bills must be paid, rent must be collected, and budgets must be made. In addition, services such as trash removal and lawn maintenance must be contracted and in place. Tenant complaints and repair requests must also be handled. These all fall somewhere under the responsibilities of either a property, real estate, or community association manager.

Those in these careers could be employed by the owner of property, or you may be employed through a property management company. Depending on the specific type of property manager you are, your focus will be different. As a property and real estate manager, one is more focused on the financial side of things and making sure that real estate investments are staying profitable. In this position you are responsible for collecting rent and making sure all bills, mortgages, insurance and other expenses are paid. As an on-site manager, your focus shifts to being on the premises to maintain the grounds, show vacant space to potential renters, inspect equipment, and enforce the terms of the rental or lease contracts, in addition to other responsibilities. Most in these careers work out of an office, although specifically when one is hired as an on-site manager they may spend more of their time away from their desk.

To get started in an on-site management position you will need at least a high school diploma. If you are interested in a commercial management position or one that handles finances or contract management, it is best to obtain a college degree. Degree options include business administration, finance, and real estate, among others. In some cases it will also be required that you hold a real estate license.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for property, real estate, and community association managers was $59,660. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that there will be 29,100 job opening each year. 

 Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/property-real-estate-and-community-association-managers.htm (visited September 08, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Accounting - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 9/13/2021

Speech-Language Pathologists (Speech Therapists)

Speech-Language Pathologists work with children and adults to prevent communication & swallowing disorders. Evaluating patients, providing diagnoses, and identifying treatment plans are all part of the job. Keeping accurate records of billing information, diagnoses given, treatment plans, as well as progress being made, are all additional responsibilities of a speech-language pathologist.

Options to specialize in this career include working with a certain age group or treating specific communication or swallowing problems. Speech-language pathologists are found in medical facilities as well as in schools. In 2020, the majority of speech-language pathologists were employed by educational services. The second largest category of employers were physical, occupational & speech therapy offices including audiologists, with hospitals following as the third largest employers.

Treatment for patients can involve working with them to make certain sounds, improve fluency, develop & strengthen muscles, and so on. Counseling is also part of the job. Families or individuals may need counseling on how to cope with these kinds of disorders.

To become a speech-language pathologist you will need at least a masters degree. A specific bachelor's degree is typically not required for admission into a master's program, but they may require that certain courses were completed during your undergrad years. It's likely that you will also need to be licensed by your state. This usually involves completing your graduate degree, having participated in clinical experience, and passing the required exam.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for speech-language pathologists was $80,480. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that we will see 15,200 job openings annually. That's a projected growth of 29% throughout this decade!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Speech-Language Pathologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/speech-language-pathologists.htm (visited September 08, 2021). 


Career of the Week - 9/06/2021

Electrical & Electronics Engineers

Electrical engineers are involved in many aspects of producing electrical equipment. They design, develop, test and oversee the manufacture and installation of their products. Electrical engineers are involved in such things as radar & navigation systems, electrical systems of automobiles & aircraft, power generation equipment, and more.  

Electronics engineers are involved in designing, developing, and working on electronic equipment. This can include such things as GPS (Global Positioning System) devices, electronic components, and electronic systems for different industry sectors including industrial, medical, military, etc... If working for the federal government, electronics engineers may find themselves working on such things as satellites and flight systems.

Most electrical and electronics engineers spend the majority of their time in the office. When a problem arises though, site visits may be necessary.

To get started in this career, typically one must have a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, electronics engineering, or a related engineering field. Completing an internship or participating in a cooperative engineering program (completed while in college), are valued by employers as well. Some universities may offer a five year plan that allows one to graduate with both a bachelor's and a master's degree.

Obtaining a license is not required for those in entry level positions. It may be advantageous though to obtain a Professional Engineering (PE) license down the line in your career. This can provide additional opportunities and expand the scope of work one can do.

While it is pretty well known that good math skills are an important quality to have in this career, writing skills are also important. Developing technical publications such as maintenance and operation manuals for the equipment you develop is also part of the job.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for electrical engineers was $100,830. At the same time it was $107,540 for electronics engineers (except computer). Between 2019 and 2029, employment for both of these careers is anticipated to grow by 3%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electrical and Electronics Engineers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm (visited August 23, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Physics, Algebra, Trigonometry & Calculus

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Career of the Week - 8/30/2021

Loan Officer

A few different types of loan officers exists: those that focus on loans to businesses (commercial loan officers), those that focus on lending money to individuals for a variety of uses (consumer loan officers), and those that focus on lending money for the purchase of real estate (mortgage loan officers). No matter what kind of loan officer you are, you will be working with individuals and/or businesses and going through a process called underwriting. Underwriting involves assessing your client's financial position, their need for a loan, and whether or not they will be able to successfully pay off the loan they are seeking.

Most loan officers work for commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage companies, and other financial institutions. Most often a bachelor's degree and on-the-job training is necessary. Majoring in business or finance can be good options. If you are interested in becoming a commercial loan officer it's important that you are able to read financial statements, thus classes in accounting may help. Others may be able to enter the field through related work experience. If you are interested in becoming a mortgage loan officer you will also need to be licensed. 

If interested in a career as a loan officer, it helps to have great interpersonal skills as you will be working directly with your customers walking them through the loan process and providing answers to their questions. Being able to make decisions is another important quality a loan officer should possess. Evaluating information and making a decision on whether or not to approve a loan is part of the job.

The median annual wage for loan officers in May 2020 was $63,960.  Between 2019 and 2029, employment of loan officers is anticipated to grow by 3%, which is estimated as $24,200 job openings each year.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Loan Officers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/loan-officers.htm (visited August 23, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II (DECA)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Marketing I (through Fowlerville HS), Marketing II (through Fowlerville HS)


Career of the Week - 6/06/2021

Construction Equipment Operators

Construction equipment operators are involved in constructing roads, bridges, buildings and other structures. They are responsible for driving, maneuvering, and controlling the heavy machinery that is used for this kind of work.  Construction equipment operators also maintain the equipment and make repairs when possible. They must also work in conjunction with those not operating machinery, but working at the construction site. They may use hand motions or other sounds signals to communicate with these workers. 

There are different types of construction equipment operators one can look into depending upon their interests. From those who operate a bulldozer or excavation machinery, to operating machines that spread and smooth concrete or compact earth, to operating machines that place piles in the earth to allow support for bridges, building foundations and more. 

As a construction equipment operator, it is important one is comfortable working at great heights, as this may be required at times. Strong hand-eye-coordination is another important skill one must have in order to accurately maneuver machinery. It is also important that those in this career possess good physical strength as lifting heavy items may be required.

There are different ways one can become a construction equipment operator. Most often a high school diploma is required to get started. One can learn from on-the-job training, by becoming an apprentice, or by attending a vocational school.  A CDL, commercial drivers license, may be required for those in this career. Having a CDL allows equipment to be hauled to jobsites. Different states have different requirements and additional licenses may be required depending upon the equipment one is operating. 

In May 2020, the median annual wage for this occupation was $49,100. Between 2019 and 2029 it is estimated that employment for this career will grow by 4%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Construction Equipment Operators,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/construction-equipment-operators.htm (visited May 11, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Automotive Technology & Construction

Wilson Talent Center - Automotive Technology, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 5/31/2021

Property Appraisers & Assessors

As a property appraiser or assessor, you will be using your expertise to provide the estimated value on real estate and/or personal and business property. Appraisers of real estate typically focus on commercial properties or residential dwellings. Assessors of real estate are those who determine how much property tax should be paid for a given property or specified area. Both property appraisers and assessors use public records to confirm property descriptions, photograph properties, review similar properties in the area to establish accurate comparable values, and document their work in written reports.

Most in these career fields work in an office, but time away for site visits is common. Typically one will need a bachelor's degree to work as an appraiser or assessor, although different states have differing requirements and in some cases all that may be needed is a high school diploma.  A training program may be required for those newly in the field. It may also be required that those working in this field become licensed, certified and/or registered, along with completing a certain number of hours in the field.

Those in this career field should enjoy spending time doing research, as this is one task involved when determining the final estimated value of land or property. Using math is a must when estimating the value of real estate as the square footage of the property and land must be determined. Being organized is another quality that one should have as there are different steps and time frames involved in the process.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for property appraisers and assessors was $58,650. Between 2019 and 2029 it is expected that employment will grow by 3%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Property Appraisers and Assessors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/appraisers-and-assessors-of-real-estate.htm (visited May 11, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - AP Computer Science


Career of the Week - 5/23/2021

Police, Fire & Ambulance Dispatchers

Answering emergency and non-emergency calls is the work of police, fire, & ambulance dispatchers. When calls come in dispatchers must figure out what type of emergency they are dealing with, as well as where it is located. They then determine who the appropriate responders are and contact them. Dispatchers will provide information to the appropriate first responder agency and also direct the dispatch of emergency personnel to the proper location. At times dispatchers will need to provide instructions for administering first aid or other basic medical care until first responders arrive. During the course of their work, dispatchers utilize multiple monitors that provide information such as maps, call information, pertinent criminal history information, as well as video at times.

Dispatchers find themselves in stressful situations in which they must remain calm. Those going into this career must be aware that evenings, weekends, and holidays may be required as dispatchers are needed at all times. To become a police, fire, & ambulance dispatcher, also known as public safety telecommunicators, a high school diploma is usually required. There is a written exam and a typing test that must be passed and possible additional screenings/tests may be required. Additional training and certification may further be required depending on the state or locality you are working in. Two-way radios and computer aided dispatch software are two items that you will be trained on.

In May 2020, the annual median wage in this career was $43,290. Between 2019 and 2026 it is estimated that employment in this career will increase by 6%.

Source of information and to learn more about this career, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/police-fire-and-ambulance-dispatchers.htm (visited May 11, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - English & Spanish

Wilson Talent Center - Career Start program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 5/16/2021

Financial Managers

There are several types of financial managers, from credit managers, to risk managers, to insurance managers and so on. Their common goal is to make certain that the financial health of the organization they work for is in good shape. Financial managers are involved in investment decisions for their organization, along with preparing financial statements and forecasting reports for the financial goals of their organization.

Financial managers must collaborate with other departments to obtain the information necessary to be able to prepare the financial statements and forecasting information. As a financial manager, you are also expected to work with top executives in your organization to share your findings and assist with financial decisions. Whichever industry or organization you are a part of, there are regulations and tax laws that as a financial manager you will be expected to be familiar with. Those financial managers with a lot of experience could advance to become the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for an organization.

At a minimum, to get started as a financial manager, you will need a bachelor's degree and several years of experience in the financial field or business field. Majoring in finance, accounting, economics or business administration, all provide the option to work in the financial industry. 

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for financial managers was $134,180. Between 2019 and 2029 it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 15%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Managers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/financial-managers.htm (visited April 26, 2021). 

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Economics, Math courses including algebra

Livingston Career & Technical Center - Finance program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 5/09/2021

Phlebotomist

Drawing blood for tests, transfusions, research, or blood donations is the work of a phlebotomist. There are several facilities you will find phlebotomists working in. These include medical & diagnostic laboratories, doctor's offices, hospitals, and blood donation centers. Some phlebotomists travel to set up mobile donation centers in different areas, while others make home visits or travel to long-term care centers.

Compassion is a great quality to possess as a phlebotomist. Some patients are fearful of having their blood drawn; being able to show kindness and understanding can help in those situations. In addition to drawing a patient's blood, phlebotomists must confirm the patient's identity and input their information into a database. They must also know how to set up and maintain the medical supplies they use, as well as disinfect the workspace area to avoid spreading germs.

Professional certification is almost always preferred by employers.  Programs for phlebotomy typically take under one year to complete and provide a certification at the end. These programs can be found at various vocational schools, technical schools, or at community colleges. As an attendee of these programs, you can expect to spend time in the classroom as well as receive training in the lab.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for phlebotomists was $36,320. Between 2019 and 2029 it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 17%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Phlebotomists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/phlebotomists.htm (visited April 14, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Human Anatomy & Physiology

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations & Capital Area Patient Care Technician (PCT) - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 5/02/2021

Athletic Trainers

When athletes experience muscle or bone injuries or illnesses, it is the job of an athletic trainer to diagnose and treat these conditions. Athletic trainers also work to prevent injuries before they occur. Tape, bandages, and braces are one way athletic trainers attempt to prevent injuries. When injuries do occur, athletic trainers must be able to recognize the injury and assess the extent of the injury. Putting into place a rehabilitation program for the injured athlete is another responsibility that falls on an athletic trainer, along with the reports and records that must be documented. Athletic trainers are also expected to administer first aid when necessary, as well as be able to provide emergency care.

As an athletic trainer, you can expect to be in contact with other healthcare personnel regarding injuries and illnesses and establishing treatment programs.

Athletic trainers have options when it comes to their working environment. You will find them working for educational institutions including high schools, colleges, and universities. Professional sports teams also employ athletic trainers, along with medical facilities and doctors offices. 

If you are considering a career as an athletic trainer, at a minimum you will need to attain a bachelors degree.  It is also very likely you will need either a license or certification depending upon the state in which you work.

In May, 2020 the median annual wage for athletic trainers was $49,860. Between 2019 and 2019 employment in this career is anticipated to grow by 16%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Athletic Trainers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/athletic-trainers.htm (visited April 14, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Anatomy, Physiology & Physics (as suggested by the U.S. Bureau of Statistics website)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations program (Therapeutic Services) 


Career of the Week - 4/25/2021

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers & Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Including Vascular Technologists

Each of these careers involves operating specialized imaging equipment for testing purposes or to create images. The outcome of this work assists physicians when trying to determine different medical conditions. Additional duties involved in these careers includes obtaining medical information from patients and preparing them for procedures, reviewing images to be certain the quality is adequate, along with being aware when images do not appear normal as one will need to summarize their findings to the physician.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers focus on the body's organs and tissues, whereas Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians focus on the heart and lungs. Each of these careers offers the opportunity to specialize in a certain area. From Abdominal Sonographers to Musculoskeletal Sonographers to Cardiographic or Electrocardiogram Technicians who specialize in EKG testing.

In 2019, most people in these careers were employed by local, state, and private hospitals. The majority of people in these careers also work full time. Time outside of normal business hours may be required as many facilities are open around the clock.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians was $59,100. For Diagnostic Medical Sonographers it was $75,920.

An associates degree or postsecondary certificate will be required to enter this field. Bachelor's degree programs are also offered. Professional certification may also be required. 

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medical-sonographers.htm (visited April 14, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Anatomy, Physiology, Physics & Math (as suggested by Bureau of Labor Statistics website)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program/class - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Health Care Foundations program/class - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 4/18/2021

Recreational Therapist

Recreational therapists use recreation-based treatment programs for their patients who may be disabled, injured or ill. Arts & crafts, music, dance, sports & games, and community outings are all ways recreational therapists help improve or support patients' physical, social, or emotional well-being.  Whether it's working on social skills, improving confidence, working to reduce stress or anxiety, or regaining basic physical or mental abilities, this is all part of the job of a recreational therapist.

Recreational therapists must be able to assess patients' needs by observing them, reviewing documents and records, as well as communicating with relatives or other professionals . They must then develop a treatment plan and determine which therapeutic activities would support that plan and the patients' goals. Evaluating the effectiveness of the programs they created is also part of the job.

A bachelor's degree in recreational therapy or a related field of study is typically required. It is also a good idea to get certified. A Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) credential is available through the NCTRC. There are also different specialty areas of certification available including behavioral health and developmental disabilities.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for recreation therapists was $47,710. Employment in this career is projected to grow between 2019 and 2029, resulting in around 1700 new job openings during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Recreational Therapists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/recreational-therapists.htm (visited April 14, 2021). 


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 4/12/2021

Construction Manager

Construction managers, also referred to as general contractors or project managers, provide planning, coordination and budgeting for construction projects, as well as supervise projects from beginning to end. This can involve preparing cost estimates, budgets, as well as timeframes for specific work to be done. Construction managers must also choose subcontractors and coordinate and schedule their portion of the project. In addition, construction managers must report progress and budget issues to the client they are working for, as well as handle any work delays, emergencies, or problems encountered during construction activities.

Most of the time a construction manager is found in a field office on the project's site. This allows managers to monitor the construction activities and make decisions onsite. 

As a construction manager, you will be working alongside architects, civil engineers, as well as trades workers. Depending on the project, you may also be interacting with lawyers or government officials such as city inspectors, to verify that the work meets certain requirements. 

There are differing paths to becoming a construction manager. If you prefer to work for a large construction firm, they may prefer you have a construction related bachelor's degree as well as work experience. Those who attain a construction related associates degree and have experience in the field may be more likely to supervise smaller projects. Those who have work experience and a high school diploma may be more likely to be self-employed as general contractor.  

In May 2020, the annual median wage for construction managers was $97,180. It is projected that between 2019 and 2029, employment of construction managers will grow by 8%!

Source of information and to learn more about this occupation, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Construction Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/construction-managers.htm (visited April 09, 2021