Welcome! Get ready to explore career options!

Focusing On The Future

The concept of career pathways is based on the need to focus on planning for our students' futures. Upon entering junior high, specific activities are introduced to help students explore different careers and identify their own career goals. One such activity is the development of an Educational Development Plan (EDP) starting in seventh grade. Per the State of Michigan/Michigan Department of Education, this Educational Development Plan is the process of identifying career goals and how they are going to be achieved. Fowlerville Community Schools uses a program called XELLO for the development of EDPs.

Additional career exploration activities in high school include various field trips, lunch & learns, work-based learning opportunities, and job shadow days provided by Livingston Educational Service Agency.

By participating in these career exploration opportunities, students should find it helpful as they select their high school courses and make their post high school plans.


Job Postings for High School Students


  1. Medical Comfort Specialists here in Fowlerville supplies reliable foam solutions for safety, positioning, securing, and warming for those using their products, most often in the medical industry. They are looking to fill summertime positions, as well as those for soon to be graduates (all positions have flexible hours). They have several positions open including an Administrative Assistant position, a General Fabricator position, a Spray Coating Operator position, and an Industrial Seamstress position. Please see this attachment for more information on each open position. Contact person is Justin Braska, jbraska@medicalcomfort.com - 517-420-2100.


  1. Green-Up Landscape and Garden Center in Fowlerville is looking to hire high school students for summer work. Contact number is 517-223-2070.


  1. VanGuilder Farms may have open positions for high school students. Contact number is 517-223-9300.


  1. Vector Marketing/Cutco offers career opportunities and also offers part time work for senior students. Check out the websites below including a seven minute video about the position.

https://www.vectormarketing.com/welcome-to-the-team

http://www.vectormarketing.com/

https://vmcdigital.wistia.com/medias/68w4hzfsj6 - Position Overview

Find information on part time work for senior students here.


  1. Independence Village Senior Living is looking to fill several positions. Please see the attached fliers for more information.


Server Flier

Dishwasher Flier

Dietary Aide Flier


Contact information - email recruiting@csig.com


  1. Capital Millwork

Who we are

-https://cptlmillwork.com/our-portfolio

What we do

-Custom cabinetry

Who we're looking for

-A young adult that's interested in carpentry and woodworking with excellent attention to detail

What we're looking for

-Part-time or full-time help (case-by-case) with the opportunity to transition into a career in craftsmanship

What you'll do:

-Cut, sand, and assemble parts for cabinet carcasses and doors

-Cut and apply trim moldings

-Assist with painting and staining of finished products

-Eventually assist with operating CNC router machine

Our hours & location

-Our shop is located on N. Nicholson Road, just north of Grand River, and operates Monday-Thursday 7am-4:30pm and Fridays 7am-12pm, no weekends


Contact Information - Megan Splitt - megan@cptlmillwork.com

  1. Down Home Construction is seeking workers who are interested in being a part of the construction industry. Down Home Construction is a small family-owned business that specializes in the construction of custom decks. They are currently looking for students who are looking for a summer job, or career after high school. Job duties include cleaning of jobsites, moving/carrying job related materials, digging post holes, and assisting on deck builds. Down Home Construction provides on the job training, and will teach prospective employees the skills required for advancement within the company.


Prior knowledge and/or experience not required, but very helpful. Typical hours are Monday-Friday 8:00am-5:00pm (occasionally Saturday). Hours vary due to weather events.

Requirements: Must be 16 years of age or older, have a drivers license and reliable transportation to their office in Howell.

Competitive pay and 401 (k).


Contact Information - Tim Brown - 517-552-9812 / tbrown@michrod.com


  1. Farmer Development, Inc. in Fowlerville is looking to fill a Project Administrator position. Please click here for details. Please contact Jared Pietila if interested or regarding any questions. 810.623.3202 or jpietila@farmerdevelopment.com.


  1. Kelly Services is hiring for local positions in Fowlerville at ZF North America. ZF North America, Inc. is a global leader in automotive manufacturing. Please see this flyer for more information. To apply, please visit the link below.

https://www.mykellyjobs.com/s/search-results?c__jobid=a7V2E0000005jjoUAA&c__jobpostid=US332XDM_BH3477265&language=en_US&utm_campaign=&c__keyword=undefined&utm_medium=&c__Location=Fenton%2C+Michigan&source=&c__Radius=25&utm_source=&utm_co


  1. The Howell Wal-Mart is currently hiring for all types of positions. A perk you may not be aware of is their $1/Day College Degree Program. Eligible associates can choose from several degree options and earn an online college degree, or earn a designated skills trade diploma for $1 a day. Check out the link here for more information. https://walmart.guildeducation.com/partner?auth_redirect=true

Career of the Week - 6/06/2022

Computer Systems Analysts

Computer Systems Analysts working for a specific company find ways that computer systems used at their place of employment can be improved. This may mean redesigning and replacing systems, or finding ways current systems can be improved. Computer systems analysts consult with mangers in the organization to get a handle on how these systems benefit their organization. When and if new systems are installed, it is the computer systems analyst who takes the lead with this process. They also conduct testing to be sure the new system(s) are operating correctly, and provide training as well.

Most often a bachelors degree will be needed to start in this career. A degree having to do with computer science/information is a popular choice for those wanting to enter this field, but not always required as other degree paths are sometimes accepted along with a certain level of skill and knowledge relevant to the job. Computer systems analysts work in various industries and understanding the line of work you are in is also a very important part of the job.

In May 2021, the median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $99,270. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 47,500 expected job openings each year during this time.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Systems Analysts, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm (visited May 16, 2022).



Career of the Week - 5/30/2022

Glaziers

Glaziers are specialists when it comes to installing glass products. Items that glaziers install can include windows or skylights in homes or commercial buildings. It can also include installing dividers to break up rooms, or even mirrors. Glaziers must be able to look at blueprints and understand what they are working with. Glaziers must also be able to use various tools to help them install glass products correctly, and they must also know how to cut glass to fit the specifications of the project they are working on. It's important to be okay working from tall heights as glaziers may find this a necessary part of their job.

After receiving a high school diploma or similar, there are a couple paths to becoming a glazier. The first option is to find an apprenticeship, whereas the second option is to learn through on-the-job-training. An apprenticeship for this particular career path normally runs three to four years. Whether you choose the apprenticeship route or on-the-job-training, many essential skills are learned during this time period. Depending on the state you live in, you may also need a license to do this kind of work. Certification can also be an option and may lead to further job opportunities.

In May, 2021, the median annual wage for those in this career was $47,180. Between 2020 and 2030, a five percent increase in employment for this career is expected. This equates to nearly 6,000 job openings per year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Glaziers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/glaziers.htm (visited May 16, 2022).

Career of the Week - 5/23/2022

Drafters

Engineers and architects create designs for various projects. It's then the job of a drafter to turn these designs into technical drawings to be used by many. Drafters complete this task by using computer aided software. These technical drawings provide various information including project dimensions and materials to be used. There are various types of drafters each having a specialization of some kind. From commercial buildings, to medical equipment, to electrical wiring, to road construction projects, and more. There is opportunity to specialize in an area that interests you.

Drafters spend a majority of their time working in an office, but at times may be found at jobsites working with engineers and others working on the same project. The technical drawings they create using computer aided software can be input into Building Information Modeling Systems, which allows multiple parties to access them and helps different parties see how their portion of the project is working in conjunction with other parts of the project.

Although it is possible to start out in this career by earning a certificate or diploma, most often one will need to earn an associate's degree of applied science. This degree is typically earned in drafting or something similar. Certification can also be an option in this industry to further provide evidence of one's knowledge and skill.

In May 2021, the median annual wage for drafters was $60,290. During this time period, the highest wages were paid to electrical and electronics drafters. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is expected to decline by 2%, although there is still expected to be over 17,000 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Drafters,

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies


Career of the Week - 5/17/2022

Atmospheric Scientists Including Meteorologists

If all things weather interests you, becoming an Atmospheric Scientist Including Meteorologists may be a great career option for you! There are several types of Atmospheric Scientists. Some focus on patterns involved with weather to help predict what future weather patterns may look like, others focus on climate change, others come up with new ways to collect weather data, yet others work to understand the weather on a specific date that may help answer questions regarding events that occurred. Most all of us are familiar with Broadcast Meteorologists as we have seen them on tv providing weather forecasts and information, although you aren't always required to be an actual Broadcast Meteorologist to report weather on tv. Weather forecasters use electronic equipment and other methods to predict upcoming weather. This information may be provided to the public, or they may work with certain industries who need guidance on upcoming weather for specific activities they are planning.


The Federal Government (excluding postal service) was the largest employer in 2020 of Atmospheric Scientists Including Meteorologists. The majority of those employed through the Federal Government work for the National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


To get started in this career you will need a bachelor’s degree in Meteorology or a similar field. If you would like to focus on research an advanced degree is usually required. In May 2021, the median pay for Atmospheric Scientists including Meteorologists was $94,570. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment for these careers will increase by 8%. This amounts to around 1,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Atmospheric Scientists, Including Meteorologists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/atmospheric-scientists-including-meteorologists.htm (visited April 19, 2022).


Career of the Week - 5/10/2022

Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners

Meeting, Convention, & Event planners handle all aspects of planning different types of events including corporate, government, and social events. They work with several parties to plan these events and are usually planning multiple events at once. Those in this career must explore different venues that are available to best suite the needs of their clients. In this role negotiation is involved when it comes to booking the venues, catering service, lodging, etc... Meeting, Convention and Event Planners may also be involved with planning additional special events or booking guest speakers.

In addition to planning events in their entirety, Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners usually coordinate some of the activities during the events, and are also the ones who must ensure that clients are happy with the outcome of the events. In addition, they must ensure that all suppliers and services are paid for.

Most often a bachelor's degree is going to be required in this career. Experience in the hospitality industry or in event planning can prove valuable as well. There are also a number of certifications available within the industry that can further enhance your career.

In May 2021, the median annual wage for Meeting, Convention, & Event Planners was $49,470. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to grow by 18%! This equates to around 16,400 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of Information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/meeting-convention-and-event-planners.htm (visited April 19, 2022).

Career of the Week - 5/03/2022

Training & Development Specialists

Employees need to continually improve their skills and increase their knowledge. Training & Development Specialists are charged with the task of putting together these training programs and administering them. There is opportunity to be hired as a training and development specialist in almost all industries. Not only do those in this career provide the training and/or training materials to employees (depending on the format the training will be delivered), but they must also determine the training needs of the employees and how best to provide these - whether through lecture, interactive training, an online option, etc... The training programs must also be evaluated to ensure effectiveness and the training and development specialist can assist with this. Budgeting and cost analysis are also part of the duties included, as well as equipment set-up, when necessary.

This is a career where you are constantly working with others. It is imperative that someone in this career is able to give presentations and be the lead person in a roomful of people or in a virtual setting.

Typically a bachelor's degree is going to be required for this position as well as related work experience. In certain situations employers may consider candidates who do not possess a bachelor's degree if their related work experience qualifies them for the job.

In May 2021 the median annual wage for training and development specialists was $61,570. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment in this career will increase by 11%. This equates to over 35,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Training and Development Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/training-and-development-specialists.htm (visited April 19, 2022).

Career of the Week - 4/25/2022

Preschool & Childcare Center Directors

Becoming a preschool or childcare center director requires one to oversee all aspects of a facility's operations. This includes supervising staff members, overseeing day to day operations, implementing education programs, hiring new staff, budgeting, professional development for staff, and more.

Opportunities exist to work in schools, independently owned preschool and childcare centers, or centers that are part of a franchise. In 2020 the largest employer of preschool and childcare center directors was that of child daycare services. Most often directors will work in an office, but will meet with parents, students and staff as is necessary. If the center offers before or after school care, additional or longer hours could be required of those in this position. Preschool and childcare directors should have good communication skills as they will regularly be speaking with parents and staff. They should also possess good leadership skills as they are responsible for making sure regulations and rules are followed at their center.

Typically a bachelor's degree is going to be required to be hired in this career, but there may be times where this will not be required. Experience working in early childhood education is usually required, and licensure may also be required depending on the state or employer you work for.

In May 2020, $47,310 was the median annual wage for preschool & childcare center directors. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for this career will increase by 11%. This amounts to around 5,300 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Preschool and Childcare Center Directors, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/preschool-and-childcare-center-directors.htm (visited April 19, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Center - Early Childhood Education program


Career of the Week - 4/18/2022

Environmental Scientists & Specialists

There are different types of Environmental Scientists & Specialists and their area of focus and responsibility can vary depending upon this. Overall, those in this field are working to protect the environment along with certain aspects of our health. The government imposes mandatory environmental and safety regulations to help with this.

As an environmental scientist or specialist you may find yourself collecting and analyzing data, creating plans to clean up pollution, releasing guidance to the public surrounding a possible environmental risk, or making recommendations as how to best protect the environment. Confirming environmental regulations in place are followed is another job duty when working specifically for the government. It is also possible to be employed through a consulting firm and consult project owners to ensure they are complying with any required regulations during the course of a construction project.

Whether you specialize on climate, health factors affecting humans, or cleaning up contaminated sites, you are working to bring forth solutions to prevent environmental issues, or address those that have occurred.

For those wanting to enter this career, a bachelor's degree in environmental science or a related major, is the most popular route to take. If one desires to move up the ladder, including supervising others or being responsible for additional duties, they would want to consider obtaining a masters degree as well. Certification is also an option for those in the field.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for those in this career was $73,230. Between 2020 and 2030 it is expected that employment will grow by 8%. This amounts to around 9,400 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Environmental Scientists and Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/environmental-scientists-and-specialists.htm (visited April 08, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Biology, Chemistry, & Physics

Wilson Talent Center - BioScience Careers Program


Career of the Week - 4/11/2022

Customer Service Representative


You will find customer service representatives in the banking industry, utilities industry, retail industry, and almost every other industry out there. Being a customer service representative involves talking with customers via phone, email, video call, text, as well as in person in certain industries. Customer service representatives provide assistance with various things depending on what business they are in. This may include: listening to complaints customers have; answering questions; and providing assistance with prior orders or new orders. Customer service representatives may have to document conversations with customers, or at times transfer customers to management to provide further assistance.


The majority of customer service representatives work full time, but part time work may also be an option. Weekends, holidays, and after hours can be required in this position. It is imperative to have good communication and interpersonal skills if you wish to be a customer service representative. Great listening skills and patience can further help those in this career.


A high school diploma is usually all it takes to get started in this career, although some people in this position do possess a postsecondary degree. Typically on the job training will be provided to those entering this career. The time frame can vary depending on the industry you are joining. In certain industries a license may be necessary to do the job.


In May 2020, the annual median hourly wage for customer service representatives was $17.23. In 2020 the two largest employers of customer service representatives were retail trade and insurance carriers and related activities. Around 361,700 job openings are expected each year between 2020 and 2030.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Customer Service Representatives,

At https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/customer-service-representatives.htm (visited March 18, 2022).


Career of the Week - 4/04/2022

Fire Inspectors & Fire Investigators

Fire Inspectors spend time in various buildings to determine if the buildings possess any sort of fire hazard. This can include apartment buildings, industrial buildings, arenas, etc... They also ensure that fire codes, whether federal, local, or state, are complied with. Another career opportunity exists as a fire investigator. Fire investigators are called upon after an explosion or fire to determine the cause as well as where the fire or explosion started.

Fire inspectors and fire investigators have many duties, a few of which are described here. Fire inspectors find themselves working with building developers to make sure their building plans adhere to current fire codes. Fire alarms and other fire protection equipment must be tested to ensure they are working properly. It is the job of a fire inspector to conduct this necessary testing. Fire inspectors also educate others on fire safety through educational programs they organize.

Fire investigators meet with witnesses to gather any information they can offer. They also collect evidence from the scene and send it to the appropriate place(s) to be tested. Fire investigators must also be ready to testify in court if necessary.

A high school diploma is needed to get into these positions, but most fire inspectors and investigators have previously worked as firefighters. Thus, many have received training applicable to these positions and will receive further training in investigation and inspection while actually in these positions.

In May 2020, the annual median wage for those in these positions was $64,610. Between 2020 and 2030 it is anticipated that employment for those in these careers will increase by 9%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Fire Inspectors, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/fire-inspectors-and-investigators.htm (visited March 13, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Firefighter Program & Emergency Medical Technician Program

Career of the Week - 3/21/2022

Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights

The work of Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights involves maintaining, troubleshooting problems, making repairs as necessary, and moving industrial equipment and machinery. The type of equipment and machinery worked on can include conveyor systems, packaging equipment, as well as production equipment. Industrial Machinery Mechanics are more involved in the troubleshooting of potential problems with machinery before it actually becomes an issue. It is common for them to perform diagnostic testing of the equipment and machinery. Machinery Maintenance Workers tend the make the repairs after a problem or potential problem is identified by the Industrial Machinery Mechanic, as well as maintain and clean equipment. Millwrights do make smaller repairs to machinery, but they are responsible for moving the location of machinery, which requires dismantling entire machines and reassembling them. Many tools are used to complete the various tasks involved in these careers. These can include socket wrenches, lathes, drill presses, lasers, and even cranes and trucks.

A high school degree or equivalent is needed to get started on this path. A year or more of on-the-job training is typically provided to those looking to become an industrial machinery mechanic or machinery maintenance worker. Two-year associate's degrees are also available in industrial maintenance. For those who wish to become millwrights, apprenticeships are the path taken to accomplish this. These typically take three to four years to complete.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for industrial machinery mechanics, machinery maintenance workers, and millwrights was $54,920. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these careers will increase by 19%! This amounts to over 56,000 openings anticipated each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Industrial Machinery Mechanics, Machinery Maintenance Workers, and Millwrights, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/industrial-machinery-mechanics-and-maintenance-workers-and-millwrights.htm (visited March 14, 2022).

Career of the Week - 3/13/2022

Writer or Author

Choosing a career as a writer or author does not automatically mean you will be writing books. Writers and authors provide content for a variety of different media sources. Websites, television shows, magazines, blogs, theatre shows, etc... are all included! Depending on your focus area, research may be necessary to complete your work. You could also find yourself working with clients to develop advertising slogans, or interviewing those featured in your writing to gain an accurate account of the details you will be sharing. Writers and authors rely on editors to help them convey the story or information they are writing in a clear and easy to understand manner.

Having a career as a writer or author provides the opportunity for self-employment or working on a freelance basis. This provides the benefit to be able to select the projects you take on, but it could also mean constant searching for new work projects as other ones are ending. One benefit of being a writer or author is that you have the capability to be able to work from pretty much anywhere, as long as you have access to a computer. Sometimes though, more of this kind of work is found in the larger markets including the New York area, as well as California and Washington D.C.

An English degree or a degree in journalism or communications can get one started in this career. Those aspiring to be writers or authors can get a head start by interning in the industry, writing for a school newspaper, or working in the radio or news industry. Another way to attain experience and possibly a paid project before earning a degree is to create a blog.

In May 2020 the median annual wage of writers and authors was $67,120. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that this career will see a 9% growth rate. This amounts to over $15,000 job openings that are anticipated each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Writers and Authors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/writers-and-authors.htm (visited March 04, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - English and writing classes


Career of the Week - 3/07/2022

Medical Assistants

You can find medical assistants working in different types of doctors offices, out-patient clinics, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Medical assistants can be involved in administrative type of work, such as obtaining and documenting health and medical information and scheduling future appointments for patients. They can also be involved in clinical work, which can include taking vital signs of patients, giving injections, drawing blood, putting dressings on wounds, etc... Those employed through a specific type of medical office may be referred to as Specialized Medical Assistants. Their duties can be specific to the type of facility they work in - this includes those working for podiatrists and those working in ophthalmology or optometry offices.

The majority of medical assistants go through an education program which provides them with a diploma or certificate. The average time to complete this is usually one year or less. Two-year programs that result in an associate's degree are also available. Some will enter the field with only a high school diploma and will receive training once in the position. Although certification is usually not required, it is an option. Candidates who wish to receive a certification must be eligible either by work experience and/or completing a formal program, and must pass an exam.

In 2020 most medical assistants were employed through physician offices. In May 2020 the median annual wage for medical assistants was $35,850. Between 2020 and 2030 employment for this occupation is expected to increase by 18%! This amounts to over 100,000 job openings projected each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Medical Assistants, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm (visited February 13, 2022).


If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Biology classes, Anatomy classes, Chemistry classes, & possibly Business & Computer classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations & Emergency Medical Technician

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations & Medical Assistant


Career of the Week - 2/28/2022

Purchasing Managers, Buyers and Purchasing Agents

Products & services that companies purchase to resell or use themselves are purchased by those referred to as Buyers and Purchasing Agents. Individuals in these roles are responsible for finding the right supplier(s) to do business with. This involves evaluating everything from pricing to delivery times, to the quality of products that will be purchased. Once a buyer or purchasing agent negotiates a contract, they must then oversee the contract to be sure that the terms of the contract are being followed. When unacceptable service or products are an issue, buyers and purchasing agents are in charge of meeting with those involved and determining a solution to correct the issue.

Purchasing Managers oversee buyers and purchasing agents and develop a plan for the work they will be responsible for. They also develop policies that buyers and purchasing agents must follow when working with suppliers and vendors.

A high school degree may suffice with smaller companies, but most often a bachelor's degree will be required to get into one of these careers. Areas of study can vary from business and finance, to a focus on agriculture if you will be dealing with farm products. On the job training is usually provided for those stepping into these careers and certifications are available. To get into the role of a purchasing manager, several years of experience in a buying or purchasing role is typically required.

In 2020, the manufacturing industry was the top employer of both buyers and purchasing agents and purchasing managers. In May of 2020, the median annual wage for buyers and purchasing agents was $66,690 and $125,940 for purchasing managers.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Purchasing Managers, Buyers, and Purchasing Agents, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/purchasing-managers-buyers-and-purchasing-agents.htm (visited February 04, 2022).


If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II, Retail Management & Operations, Economics, Agriculture courses if interested in dealing with farm products

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Agricultural courses if interested in dealing with farm products


Career of the Week - 2/21/2022

Elevator and Escalator Installers and Repairers

When elevators, escalators, moving walkways, or lifts need repairs or general maintenance, elevator and escalator installers and repairers are the experts. To be able to successfully complete their job, they must be able to read blue prints to understand how each different system is set up. Their jobs involve troubleshooting malfunctioning equipment, repairing and replacing defective parts, inspecting equipment to ensure it complies with safety requirements, testing new equipment, and documenting and recording all repairs and work performed, in addition to other duties. Protective equipment including hard hats, safety glasses, and harnesses are a must in this occupation, as there is the possibility for injuries to happen. In 2020, eighty-five percent of elevator and escalator installers and repairers were employed by building equipment contractors.

To get started in this career, most often a high school diploma will be required. Apprenticeships are the path that nearly everyone gets their start in this career, and typically this takes four years to complete. It's most likely you will also need to be licensed to work in this career. Their is also the opportunity to become certified through different associations in the industry, as well as opportunity for advancement in the field with additional training.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for elevator and escalator installers and repairers was $88,540, with the government being the highest paying industry at $96,530. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that the occupation will grow by 6%! This means there will be around 2,500 job openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Elevator and Escalator Installers and Repairers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/elevator-installers-and-repairers.htm (visited February 07, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Math, Physics

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design, Construction

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 2/14/2022

Occupational Health & Safety Specialists and Technicians

Occupational health & safety specialists and technicians visit various places of employment to evaluate health and safety aspects. They may conduct different tests in the workplace, inspect machinery and equipment, and document different work practices. This is all done to ensure a safe environment for employees, to protect the environment, and protect the health & wellbeing of all. After inspecting a place of employment, a report must be generated. If it is found that there is a need to provide training programs on safety in the workplace, or provide improved workplace procedures to help workers stay safe on the job, occupational health & safety specialists and technicians take on this responsibility.

Offices and factories are a couple places you will find occupational health & safety specialists and technicians working. Many times travel is involved, and weekend time, as well as time outside of normal business hours may be required. To become an occupational health & safety specialist typically requires a bachelor's degree. To start a career as an occupational health & safety technician may only require training received on the job, or earning a certificate or two-year degree. There are also opportunities to earn certifications in the industry.

In May 2020, $76,340 was the median annual wage for occupational health & safety specialists. During that same time period it was $53,340 for occupational health & safety technicians. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these careers will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 9,600 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-health-and-safety-specialists-and-technicians.htm (visited January 28, 2022).

If you are interested in these careers, consider taking the following while in high school!

English, Mathematics, chemistry, biology & physics


Career of the Week - 2/07/2022

Mathematicians & Statisticians

Mathematicians and statisticians work to solve problems in several different sectors by collecting information and analyzing it. Mathematicians and statisticians must decide what information must be collected that will provide answers or information being sought, and they must decide what collection method or methods will be used to attain the needed information. Surveys, experiments, and opinion polls are a few ways information is collected. The collected information must be analyzed and findings are then communicated to the party seeking the information. Many fields use data analysis to make decisions. These include the government, healthcare, business, and education. The information collected and studied can directly impact which products may be developed, decisions the government makes, or used to understand which treatment options may be working against a disease.

In 2020, the majority of mathematicians worked for the federal government, while statisticians were more spread out through different employment sectors. Most positions for mathematicians and statisticians require at least a master's degree, but those with only a bachelor's degree will typically find some opportunities as well. Yet other opportunities or advanced level positions may require a doctoral degree. Taking courses in other fields of study can further provide an advantage when seeking to work in a specific industry.

In May 2020, $110,860 was the median annual wage for mathematicians. During that same time period it was $92,270 for statisticians. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for these careers is anticipated to grow by 33%. This amounts to over 5,000 openings expected each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mathematicians and Statisticians,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/mathematicians-and-statisticians.htm (visited February 13, 2022).

If you are interested in these careers, consider taking the following while in high school!

High School - Many math classes.


Career of the Week - 1/31/2022

Food Service Managers

Businesses or institutions that prepare and serve food & beverages need someone to oversee their operations. This is the job of a food service manager. Many responsibilities fall under this role. These includes interviewing and hiring new employees, ordering food and necessary supplies required to run the business, confirming the establishment is in compliance with food safety and health requirements, determining employee schedules, and verifying that the business is profitable, among other duties.

A few places you can find food service managers include restaurants, school & office cafeterias, and hotels. It is common for those in this career to work outside of normal business hours. Weekends and holidays are often part of a food service manager's schedule.

Many times experience in the industry and a high school diploma are all it takes to get going in this career. Some employers may prefer a bachelors degree and there are a few options for this. Restaurant and Hospitality Management is one degree available, while Institutional Food Service Management is another. Business is another degree that can be beneficial to those wanting a career as a food service manager. Associate degree programs through community colleges and other institutions are also an option.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for food service managers was $56,590. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to increase by 15%. This amounts to over 41,000 openings each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Food Service Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/food-service-managers.htm (visited January 17, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II, Retail Management & Operations, Nutrition & Culinary Explorations

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Culinary Arts

Wilson Talent Center - Career Start & Culinary Arts & Hospitality


Career of the Week - 1/24/2022

Electrical & Electronics Repairers & Installers

Repairing, installing and maintaining different electrical equipment is the job of electrical & electronics repairers and installers. There are a wide range of different types of electrical & electronics repairers and installers. Some focus on the commercial and industrial market, while others focus on such things as electric motors and power tools. There are opportunities to specialize in transportation equipment or motor vehicles, as well as powerhouse and substations. The industries where career opportunities exist, range from telecommunications, to utilities, transportation, manufacturing, and more.

In these careers, you will find yourself working with customers to address equipment needing repair. It is your responsibility to diagnose the problem and do what is necessary to fix the issue - whether this involves repairing or replacing part of the equipment. After a repair is made the equipment must be tested to insure it is working properly, as well that it meets the requirements of the employer. It is also your responsibility to document the repairs that were made, components that were replaced, and the amount of time it took, etc...

A high school education at minimum is required to jump into this industry, but attending an electronics program through a technical school or community college may provide the necessary training to be able to specialize within the industry. Work experience and apprenticeships are also valuable to bring when entering this career. Training is often provided through employers on specific equipment, and new employees usually work on developing their skills by working alongside a technician that has been around for awhile.

In 2020, the largest employer of electrical and electronics repairers and installers was the manufacturing industry, with the utility industry following after. In May of 2020, the median annual wage for electrical and electronics installers and repairers was $62,020. Those who worked on powerhouses, substations, and relays were the highest paid during this time. Between 2020 and 2030, there is expected to be a two percent increase in employment for electrical and electronics installers and repairers. This equates to around 9,600 openings per year during this time.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/electrical-and-electronics-installers-and-repairers.htm (visited January 18, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Energy Technology Program, Robotics/Mechatronics, Automotive Technology

Wilson Talent Center - Automotive Technology, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 1/17/2022

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work with several parties to come up with ways to bring interest to the products or services to be sold. From researching who the customers will be, to knowing what kind of budget they are working with, to choosing by which means to advertise through, there is much planning involved in the process. Other types of activities involved may include, hiring others to assist with marketing, meeting with clients to discuss marketing strategies, and recommending pricing of products or services.

Specifically, advertising managers focus on drumming up product interest with those they believe are potential customers. Promotions managers focus on adding incentives to their programs for those who purchase the advertised products or services. Marketing managers are focused on determining what the demand will be for a company's products or services, and helping them determine how to gain the most market share.

Creativity is an important quality among those who may want to get into this career field, as new and creative ideas are always needed to bring attention to new products or services. Interpersonal skills are another important quality. Those in these roles tend to work with others from outside their organization, and must also be able to work successfully with their own team.

To be able to attain one of these positions, most often a bachelor's degree will be required. Most will also come into these management positions with work experience in the field. Degrees in advertising or journalism are options for those who wish to be advertising managers. A business degree or related degree is recommended for marketing managers. Internships are also a great way to gain knowledge and experience in the field before jumping in.

In May 2022, the median annual wage for advertising and promotions managers was $133,460, and $142,170 for marketing managers. Between 2020 and 2030, it is anticipated that employment for these three careers will increase by 10%! Over 31,000 openings each year are projected during this time period!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm (visited January 17, 2022).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing 1 & Marketing 2

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Marketing 1 & Marketing 2 (at FHS)

Wilson Talent Center - Business & Risk Management


Career of the Week - 1/10/2022

Librarians or Library Media Specialists

Conducting research and helping others find information are two job duties of librarians and library media specialists. Different types of librarians and library media specialists exist. These include academic librarians, public librarians, administrative service librarians, school librarians, and special librarians, among others. Librarians and library media specialists handle the organization of the library so patrons have easy access to the books or information they are searching for. They are also responsible for bringing new books and materials into the library and must conduct research on the items. Different programs are often available through public libraries for different patrons. This can include story time for the younger audience, as well as book clubs for older children and adults.

Depending on the type of librarian you are, you could be working in a school, local public library, or postsecondary educational institution. Others who employ special librarians, also called information librarians, include private businesses and government agencies, among other organizations. An additional degree may be required of those in these positions.

To become a librarian, you will most often need a masters degree in library science (MLS). Different schools may refer to this degree under different names including, "Master of Information Studies." No specific undergraduate degree is usually required to enter into a masters program and program length can range from a year to two years. Information covered in such graduate degree programs usually include learning internet search techniques, various research methods and strategies, as well as learning about online reference systems. Different job titles and places of employment may have additional requirements to become a librarian or library media specialist.

In May 2020, the annual median wage for librarians and library media specialists was $60,820. Between 2020 an 2030, employment for this career is expected to grow by 9%. This amounts to over 15,000 job openings anticipated each year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Librarians and Library Media Specialists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm (visited December 21, 2021).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

Literature courses including advanced placement courses


Career of the Week - 1/03/2022

Clinical Laboratory Technologists & Technicians

Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians, also known as medical laboratory scientists, can be found working in hospitals, laboratories, as well as doctor’s offices. Their jobs involve running various tests on bodily fluids, samples of tissue, as well as other substances. This testing requires utilizing equipment such as microscopes, cell counters, and automated & computerized equipment, which allows for multiple tests to run at once. Clinical laboratory technologists & technicians also update patient records with their findings and communicate them back to the physicians and other healthcare professionals who ordered the tests.


Typically technicians will perform more of the routine types of tests that may use automated equipment, whereas technologists may be working on more complex and manual types of tests. Both technologists and technicians are able to specialize in a particular area. From working specifically with blood, to identifying different types of bacteria, or examining cells to identify if anything abnormal is present, there are several options to specialize.


Becoming a clinical laboratory technologist will most often require you to obtain a bachelor's degree in medical technology or a related field. An associates degree or post secondary certificate is usually needed to work as a clinical laboratory technician. A Clinical Laboratory Science Degree is one such program offered for those who wish to become technicians. Both technologists & technicians may need to be licensed depending on the state they work in.


In May 2020, the median annual wage of clinical laboratory technologists and technicians was $54,180. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for these professions is expected to grow by 11%! This equates to over 25,000 job openings each year during this time period!


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/clinical-laboratory-technologists-and-technicians.htm (visited December 21, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Chemistry, Biology & Math courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program

Wilson Talent Center - Bioscience careers program


Career of the Week - 12/13/2021

Veterinary Technologists & Technicians

Veterinary technologists & technicians work under the direction of veterinarians and conduct medical tests including laboratory and diagnostic tests, in order to determine medical diagnoses for illnesses and injuries animals may be facing.

Being a veterinary technologist or technician involves such duties as: providing that initial first care for a sick or injured animal, preparing for surgery, administering medicines & vaccines, observing animal behavior, keeping patient records, and communicating with the owners of the animals. You can find veterinary technologist and technicians both in research related jobs, as well as in animal medical offices. Either way they are working under the direction of veterinarians or scientists, depending on the area of employment.

To become a veterinary technologist or technician you will need to complete a program in veterinary technology. Becoming a technologist typically requires a four-year degree, while becoming a technician only requires a two-year degree. One will most likely need to become licensed or registered depending on the state you work in. Typically this involves passing an exam.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for these occupations was $36,260. Between 2020 and 2030 it's anticipated that growth for these occupations will be 15%. This amounts to around 10,400 jobs openings per year during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Veterinary Technologists and Technicians,at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm (visited November 24, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Biology & Other Science Courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Agricultural Science /Botany / Zoology

Wilson Talent Center - Bioscience Careers


Career of the Week - 12/06/2021

Court Reporters & Simultaneous Captioners


Court reporters spend their time capturing the exact words spoken at legal proceedings, as this is a requirement of these proceedings. This includes administrative hearings, depositions, trials, etc. Judges and lawyers may utilize these records after the fact, or court reporters may be asked to read back part of what they have recorded during such proceedings. Court reporters not only capture exact words spoken, but also record gestures and/or actions taken during these proceedings.


Simultaneous captioners provide similar services, although outside of courtrooms and legal proceedings. Their services are often provided to the deaf or hard of hearing. They transcribe spoken words at such places as press conferences and doctors appointments. Simultaneous captioners are not always required to be at the appointment or event that they are transcribing - due to being able to connect virtually. Other simultaneous captioners provide what is known as “closed captions” for television programs. Both of these occupations capture speech, gestures, and actions using different devices and methods.


Certificate programs as well as associate degree programs are offered at some community colleges. To get started in one of these careers you will most likely need one of the two. Oftentimes, one must also be licensed or become certified through a professional association.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for these careers was $61,660. Between 2020 and 2030, it is expected that employment of these careers will increase by 3%. This amounts to around 2,100 job openings each year during this time.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Court Reporters and Simultaneous Captioners, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/court-reporters.htm (visited November 24, 2021).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - English classes


Career of the Week - 11/29/2021

Urban & Regional Planners


Urban and regional planners help determine how land will be used in cities and towns where buildings need to be updated, there is a growth in the population, or when a community is being created.


Urban and regional planners meet with several people during the course of their work. Public officials, the public, and developers are all involved with the work they do. Urban and regional planners not only review plans submitted by developers, they must then present these plans to communities and planning committees. Those in this career must be aware of government policies when it comes to land use, and must be up to date on current zoning laws and regulations affecting the environment. They will ultimately provide a recommendation on whether a proposal should be approved or denied. In 2020 the majority (70%) of urban and regional planners were employed by local governments - excluding education and hospitals.


To be able to get into this career, most often one will need a master’s degree from an urban or regional planning program. If you don’t have a master’s degree but hold a bachelor’s degree, you could become employed as a junior planner or assistant. Internships are a great way to gain experience in this field and at times, experience will be required to attain a job.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for urban and regional planners was $75,950. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for this occupation will grow by 7%. This amounts to around 3,700 job openings annually during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Urban and Regional Planners, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/urban-and-regional-planners.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Economics

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 11/22/2021

Flight Attendant


Securing the safety and comfort of passengers on an airplane is the job of a flight attendant. Flight attendants provide standard services such as selling food and beverages, they also inspect emergency equipment prior to a flight, as well as ensure passengers know how to utilize the safety equipment if needed. Flight attendants must be sure that all passengers are following company policies and federal law when it comes to safety protocols.


Before take off, pilots may meet with the flight attendants to go over any important information about the upcoming flight. Beyond greeting & assisting passengers, as well as advising, demonstrating, and inspecting safety equipment, flight attendants are trained to handle emergencies. These could include fire hazards, assisting passengers with evacuation when necessary, handling disruptive behavior, and administering first aid. If any issue of the kind did occur during the flight, it must be documented by way of submitting a report.


Flight attendants schedules can vary. Flight attendants may work outside normal business hours as flights are around the clock and include holidays.


Usually a high school diploma is required to get started in this career. Employers provide the necessary training and it is a requirement that all flight attendants are certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as well as pass other screening tests. If you are working on an international flight, it may required that you are fluent in another language.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for flight attendants was $59,050. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 30%! This amounts to around 17,600 job openings per year during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Flight Attendants,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/flight-attendants.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!


High School - Emergency Response Readiness - Foreign language classes


Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Care Occupations (first year course)


Wilson Talent Center - Health Foundations (first year course)


Career of the Week - 11/15/2021

Sales Engineers

Sales Engineers sell complicated scientific and technological products and services, such as manufacturing equipment or IT systems, to businesses. Sales engineers must not only understand their products and how they work, they must also be able to communicate these aspects to customers through presentations. At times, products will need to be modified for specific customers. Sales engineers will work with businesses to determine what problem they need solved, and then determine how their product needs to be modified in order to solve that problem. At the end of the day, sales engineers must bring in sales, therefore, they must build relationships with customers, prove to their clients that their products are superior to others’ products, and secure sales orders.


Most often a bachelor’s degree in engineering or something related to engineering will help one get into this career. Although at times this may not be required if one has sales experience or has a degree in business or science. Typically students pick an area of engineering to specialize in - this can range from civil engineering to electrical engineering to biomedical engineering, and more. After earning a degree, most often one will need to go through sales training before getting out in the field and being able to sell. An important quality for those in this career is having strong interpersonal skills as sales engineers are constantly working with customers and must be able to present their information clearly and effectively.


In May of 2020, the median annual wage for sales engineers was $108,830. Between 2020 and 2030 employment is anticipated to grow 8%. This amounts to around 7,300 annual job openings during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Sales Engineers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/sales-engineers.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Marketing I & Marketing II


Livingston Career & Technical - Business & Marketing program, Engineering program, Computer Network Engineering program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Wilson Talent Center -Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 11/08/2021

Social & Community Service Managers


Supporting public well-being by running programs and services intended to make a positive impact on those served, is the job of social and community service managers.


Social & community service managers typically work to determine which programs are needed in their community. They also work to make people aware of these programs, and to obtain the needed funding. They evaluate programs in place to gauge what kind of impact they are making, and recommend improvements and changes where needed.


Most often a bachelor’s degree along with experience is needed to get into this career. In some instances a master’s degree is needed. Gaining experience by working as a social worker is one way to move into this career. Good communication skills are a must for those in this career, as well as good managerial skills, as you will be responsible to handle budgets for the programs in place and handle various issues that come up.


In May of 2020, the median annual wage for social and community service managers was $69,600. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for these careers will increase by 15%! This amounts to nearly 18,300 job openings each year during this time period!


Source of information and to learn more, please visit:


Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social and Community Service Managers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/social-and-community-service-managers.htm (visited October 28, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School Classes - Psychology 1, Psychology 2, & AP Psychology

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Education program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 11/01/2021

Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts, & Testers

If you would enjoy spending your time designing computer applications and programs, then you may want to consider a career as a software developer. In this career you will determine what it is that needs to be accomplished for those using the software. You will design entire programs and how every piece works together. At times you may also recommend that customers upgrade their software.

If you would prefer to test applications & programs to look for flaws and problems, then a career as a quality assurance analyst or tester might be the better option. In this career you will provide feedback on any issues or flaws you come across when conducting testing, using the systems you designed for that purpose.

Receiving a bachelor's degree in computer and information technology is the most common way to get started in one of these careers. Related degrees such as those in math or engineering can also provide a pathway to one of these careers. It is important for those going into these careers to have a substantial amount of knowledge when it comes to programming computers.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for those having a career as a software developer, quality assurance analyst, and tester was $110,140. Between 2020 and 2030 a growth of 22% in employment for these careers has been projected. This equates to around $189,200 job openings each year during this time frame.

Source of information and to learn more about this career, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts, and Testers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/software-developers.htm (visited October 28, 2021).

If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School Classes - Math classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Computer Programming, Computer Network Engineering, Engineering - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Programming & Mobile Applications, Engineering Technologies - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/25/2021

Carpenter

There are several types of specialized carpenters, but in general, carpenters construct and install various structures and frameworks, while also making repairs when needed. Carpenters also spend time installing various fixtures including windows and cabinets. Carpenters must be able to read blueprints to do their job. It is important that they also follow the plans that have been laid out for the buildings they are working on. Carpenters use tools like levels, sanders, and nail guns to do their jobs. Heavier machinery such as cranes may be needed for larger jobs.

To get your career started as a carpenter, you will typically need a high school diploma. Most often training is accomplished on the job or through an apprenticeship program, although associate programs for carpentry are available at some schools. If you are interested in an apprenticeship program you should be able to find these through contractor associations and/or unions. Once you are a carpenter, there are certifications available, based on specialty, that may help you advance your career or lead to further job opportunities.

In 2020, the majority of carpenters (26%) were self-employed, followed closely by those employed by residential building constructors (22%).

In May 2020, the median annual wage for carpenters was $49,520. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that careers in carpentry will increase by 2%. This equates to nearly 89,300 annual job openings during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Carpenters,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/carpenters.htm (visited October 05, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Mathematics classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Construction Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/18/2021

Audiologist

An audiologist is a specialist when it comes to diagnosing and treating hearing, balance, and other ear related issues. Not only do they examine and provide treatment for patients, they also help patients manage these kinds of issues. For example, one way they do this is by counseling patients and family members on different ways to communicate with those who have hearing loss. Lip reading is one suggestion they may give, along with utilizing technology to communicate as well. Fitting patients with hearing aids and monitoring their progress is another task audiologists perform. If treatment plans need to be modified, it is the job of an audiologist to determine and implement the necessary changes. Audiologists also spend time doing research to help them understand the causes and treatment options for hearing loss and balance issues. When trying to diagnose patients, audiologists use different devices including computers and audiometers to test for balance and hearing issues, including the extent of any hearing loss.

It is important for those going into this field to have good communication skills as they will be consistently working with patients and their families, and possibly other health providers as part of a team. It is also important that those in this field show compassion, as patients may be upset about their situation.

Audiologists hold a doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D). This is a four year program completed after a bachelor's degree is earned. It is also a requirement that audiologists are licensed. Specific requirements for licensure can vary by state. There are also options to earn a certificate or credentials through different organizations in the industry.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for audiologists was $81,030. In 2020, the largest employer of audiologists were offices of physicians. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that employment for this career will grow by 16%.

Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Audiologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/audiologists.htm (visited October 05, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Anatomy, Physiology, Physics classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/11/2021

Physician Assistant


A career as a physician assistant involves providing medical care to patients as part of a team of doctors, while also working under their supervision. Responsibilities that physician assistants can take on vary based on the state they work in. Most physician assistants conduct examinations of patients, diagnose illnesses and injuries, prescribe medication, order appropriate testing, and educate patients on health conditions and proper care.


In 2020, the majority of physician assistants were employed by doctors offices, followed by hospitals. There is opportunity throughout the medical field for physician assistants. Whether it is with a primary care provider, in emergency medicine, surgery, or other, you will find physician assistants in many areas of medicine.


To become a physician assistant you will most often need to have a master’s degree from an accredited program and become licensed in your state. It’s also advantageous to have experience working with patients when applying to graduate school.


In May 2020, the median annual wage for physician assistants was $115,390. Between 2020 and 2030, employment for this career is anticipated to increase by 31%. This equates to around 12,200 annual job openings during this time period.


Source of information and to learn more, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Physician Assistants,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physician-assistants.htm (visited October 05, 2021).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

High School - Human Anatomy & Physiology, Emergency Response Readiness,


Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program & Emergency Medical Technician Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare programs - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/04/2021

Machinists and Tool & Die Makers

As a Machinist or Tool & Die Maker, you will be involved in producing metal parts, instruments, or tools through the operation of mechanically and computer controlled equipment.

Machinists are specifically involved in producing precision metal parts through the use of different machines. Lathes, grinders, and milling machines comprise some of the machines used. Many times both manual and CNC machinery is used. While machinists can produce large amounts of certain products, at times, you will also find them producing small quantities of unique items. In addition, they may repair or make new parts for current machinery.

Tool & Die Makers are the ones who produce the machinery that will eventually produce the precision metal parts. The machines produced can form and cut metal as well as other materials. Computer Aided Design (CAD) is also used by tool & die makers.

You can typically become a machinist with a high school degree and expect to learn on the job, but becoming a tool & die maker may require additional coursework. Apprenticeships are an option, as well as two-year technical schools or community college programs. Learning to read blue prints and how to program computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines, are typically taught through the two year educational programs.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for machinists was $45,840, and at the same time the median annual wage for tool & die makers was $54,760. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that employment for the occupation of machinists will grow by 7%, while employment of tool & die makers will grow by 2%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Machinists and Tool and Die Makers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/machinists-and-tool-and-die-makers.htm (visited September 08, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math courses

Livingston CTE - Manufacturing program & Engineering/CAD program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Precision Machining Technology program & Engineering Technologies program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 9/27/2021

Probation Officers & Correctional Treatment Specialists

Providing social services to those in custody, or those on parole or probation, is the job of a Probation Officer & Correctional Treatment Specialist. The social services provided are to assist in the rehabilitation of these individuals. Depending on your specific job title your role may vary, but some of the job duties involved are: evaluating these individuals in order to determine what course of rehabilitation would be best, interviewing friends and family of the offender to gauge if progress is being made, administering drug tests, as well as testifying in court.

The different types of probation officers & correctional treatment specialists include: probation officers, parole officers, pretrial services officers, and correctional treatment specialists. Probation officers specifically work with offenders who have been put on probation instead of serving time in prison. Parole officers assist those released from prison and are now on parole, as they re-enter back into society. Pretrial service officers provide investigative services before a defendant's trial date. They must provide a recommendation to the judge as to whether it is safe to release the defendant prior to their trial date. Correctional treatment specialists work on the rehabilitation plans for those on probation or parole. They may assist with job placement & housing, as well as make sure the individual they are working with understands the condition and terms of their release.

Most often a bachelor's degree is going to be required to get into one of these careers. A degree in criminal justice can be one avenue. Additional competency exams and testing is usually required. It is also possible to receive additional training to be able to specialize in working with a certain group. These can include domestic violence offenders, juvenile offenders, or substance abusers.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists was $55,690. Between 2020 and 2030 these careers are anticipated to grow by four percent.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/probation-officers-and-correctional-treatment-specialists.htm (visited September 08, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Criminal Justice Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 9/20/2021

Property, Real Estate, & Community Association Managers

There are many tasks involved when it comes to taking care of residential, commercial, and industrial properties. Bills must be paid, rent must be collected, and budgets must be made. In addition, services such as trash removal and lawn maintenance must be contracted and in place. Tenant complaints and repair requests must also be handled. These all fall somewhere under the responsibilities of either a property, real estate, or community association manager.

Those in these careers could be employed by the owner of property, or you may be employed through a property management company. Depending on the specific type of property manager you are, your focus will be different. As a property and real estate manager, one is more focused on the financial side of things and making sure that real estate investments are staying profitable. In this position you are responsible for collecting rent and making sure all bills, mortgages, insurance and other expenses are paid. As an on-site manager, your focus shifts to being on the premises to maintain the grounds, show vacant space to potential renters, inspect equipment, and enforce the terms of the rental or lease contracts, in addition to other responsibilities. Most in these careers work out of an office, although specifically when one is hired as an on-site manager they may spend more of their time away from their desk.

To get started in an on-site management position you will need at least a high school diploma. If you are interested in a commercial management position or one that handles finances or contract management, it is best to obtain a college degree. Degree options include business administration, finance, and real estate, among others. In some cases it will also be required that you hold a real estate license.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for property, real estate, and community association managers was $59,660. Between 2020 and 2030 it is projected that there will be 29,100 job opening each year.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/property-real-estate-and-community-association-managers.htm (visited September 08, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Accounting - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 9/13/2021

Speech-Language Pathologists (Speech Therapists)

Speech-Language Pathologists work with children and adults to prevent communication & swallowing disorders. Evaluating patients, providing diagnoses, and identifying treatment plans are all part of the job. Keeping accurate records of billing information, diagnoses given, treatment plans, as well as progress being made, are all additional responsibilities of a speech-language pathologist.

Options to specialize in this career include working with a certain age group or treating specific communication or swallowing problems. Speech-language pathologists are found in medical facilities as well as in schools. In 2020, the majority of speech-language pathologists were employed by educational services. The second largest category of employers were physical, occupational & speech therapy offices including audiologists, with hospitals following as the third largest employers.

Treatment for patients can involve working with them to make certain sounds, improve fluency, develop & strengthen muscles, and so on. Counseling is also part of the job. Families or individuals may need counseling on how to cope with these kinds of disorders.

To become a speech-language pathologist you will need at least a masters degree. A specific bachelor's degree is typically not required for admission into a master's program, but they may require that certain courses were completed during your undergrad years. It's likely that you will also need to be licensed by your state. This usually involves completing your graduate degree, having participated in clinical experience, and passing the required exam.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for speech-language pathologists was $80,480. Between 2020 and 2030, it is projected that we will see 15,200 job openings annually. That's a projected growth of 29% throughout this decade!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Speech-Language Pathologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/speech-language-pathologists.htm (visited September 08, 2021).


Career of the Week - 9/06/2021

Electrical & Electronics Engineers

Electrical engineers are involved in many aspects of producing electrical equipment. They design, develop, test and oversee the manufacture and installation of their products. Electrical engineers are involved in such things as radar & navigation systems, electrical systems of automobiles & aircraft, power generation equipment, and more.

Electronics engineers are involved in designing, developing, and working on electronic equipment. This can include such things as GPS (Global Positioning System) devices, electronic components, and electronic systems for different industry sectors including industrial, medical, military, etc... If working for the federal government, electronics engineers may find themselves working on such things as satellites and flight systems.

Most electrical and electronics engineers spend the majority of their time in the office. When a problem arises though, site visits may be necessary.

To get started in this career, typically one must have a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, electronics engineering, or a related engineering field. Completing an internship or participating in a cooperative engineering program (completed while in college), are valued by employers as well. Some universities may offer a five year plan that allows one to graduate with both a bachelor's and a master's degree.

Obtaining a license is not required for those in entry level positions. It may be advantageous though to obtain a Professional Engineering (PE) license down the line in your career. This can provide additional opportunities and expand the scope of work one can do.

While it is pretty well known that good math skills are an important quality to have in this career, writing skills are also important. Developing technical publications such as maintenance and operation manuals for the equipment you develop is also part of the job.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for electrical engineers was $100,830. At the same time it was $107,540 for electronics engineers (except computer). Between 2019 and 2029, employment for both of these careers is anticipated to grow by 3%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electrical and Electronics Engineers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/electrical-and-electronics-engineers.htm (visited August 23, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Physics, Algebra, Trigonometry & Calculus

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Career of the Week - 8/30/2021

Loan Officer

A few different types of loan officers exists: those that focus on loans to businesses (commercial loan officers), those that focus on lending money to individuals for a variety of uses (consumer loan officers), and those that focus on lending money for the purchase of real estate (mortgage loan officers). No matter what kind of loan officer you are, you will be working with individuals and/or businesses and going through a process called underwriting. Underwriting involves assessing your client's financial position, their need for a loan, and whether or not they will be able to successfully pay off the loan they are seeking.

Most loan officers work for commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage companies, and other financial institutions. Most often a bachelor's degree and on-the-job training is necessary. Majoring in business or finance can be good options. If you are interested in becoming a commercial loan officer it's important that you are able to read financial statements, thus classes in accounting may help. Others may be able to enter the field through related work experience. If you are interested in becoming a mortgage loan officer you will also need to be licensed.

If interested in a career as a loan officer, it helps to have great interpersonal skills as you will be working directly with your customers walking them through the loan process and providing answers to their questions. Being able to make decisions is another important quality a loan officer should possess. Evaluating information and making a decision on whether or not to approve a loan is part of the job.

The median annual wage for loan officers in May 2020 was $63,960. Between 2019 and 2029, employment of loan officers is anticipated to grow by 3%, which is estimated as $24,200 job openings each year.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Loan Officers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/loan-officers.htm (visited August 23, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Marketing I, Marketing II (DECA)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Marketing I (through Fowlerville HS), Marketing II (through Fowlerville HS)


Career of the Week - 6/06/2021

Construction Equipment Operators

Construction equipment operators are involved in constructing roads, bridges, buildings and other structures. They are responsible for driving, maneuvering, and controlling the heavy machinery that is used for this kind of work. Construction equipment operators also maintain the equipment and make repairs when possible. They must also work in conjunction with those not operating machinery, but working at the construction site. They may use hand motions or other sounds signals to communicate with these workers.

There are different types of construction equipment operators one can look into depending upon their interests. From those who operate a bulldozer or excavation machinery, to operating machines that spread and smooth concrete or compact earth, to operating machines that place piles in the earth to allow support for bridges, building foundations and more.

As a construction equipment operator, it is important one is comfortable working at great heights, as this may be required at times. Strong hand-eye-coordination is another important skill one must have in order to accurately maneuver machinery. It is also important that those in this career possess good physical strength as lifting heavy items may be required.

There are different ways one can become a construction equipment operator. Most often a high school diploma is required to get started. One can learn from on-the-job training, by becoming an apprentice, or by attending a vocational school. A CDL, commercial drivers license, may be required for those in this career. Having a CDL allows equipment to be hauled to jobsites. Different states have different requirements and additional licenses may be required depending upon the equipment one is operating.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for this occupation was $49,100. Between 2019 and 2029 it is estimated that employment for this career will grow by 4%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Construction Equipment Operators,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/construction-equipment-operators.htm (visited May 11, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math courses

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Automotive Technology & Construction

Wilson Talent Center - Automotive Technology, Construction Technology


Career of the Week - 5/31/2021

Property Appraisers & Assessors

As a property appraiser or assessor, you will be using your expertise to provide the estimated value on real estate and/or personal and business property. Appraisers of real estate typically focus on commercial properties or residential dwellings. Assessors of real estate are those who determine how much property tax should be paid for a given property or specified area. Both property appraisers and assessors use public records to confirm property descriptions, photograph properties, review similar properties in the area to establish accurate comparable values, and document their work in written reports.

Most in these career fields work in an office, but time away for site visits is common. Typically one will need a bachelor's degree to work as an appraiser or assessor, although different states have differing requirements and in some cases all that may be needed is a high school diploma. A training program may be required for those newly in the field. It may also be required that those working in this field become licensed, certified and/or registered, along with completing a certain number of hours in the field.

Those in this career field should enjoy spending time doing research, as this is one task involved when determining the final estimated value of land or property. Using math is a must when estimating the value of real estate as the square footage of the property and land must be determined. Being organized is another quality that one should have as there are different steps and time frames involved in the process.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for property appraisers and assessors was $58,650. Between 2019 and 2029 it is expected that employment will grow by 3%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Property Appraisers and Assessors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/appraisers-and-assessors-of-real-estate.htm (visited May 11, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - AP Computer Science


Career of the Week - 5/23/2021

Police, Fire & Ambulance Dispatchers

Answering emergency and non-emergency calls is the work of police, fire, & ambulance dispatchers. When calls come in dispatchers must figure out what type of emergency they are dealing with, as well as where it is located. They then determine who the appropriate responders are and contact them. Dispatchers will provide information to the appropriate first responder agency and also direct the dispatch of emergency personnel to the proper location. At times dispatchers will need to provide instructions for administering first aid or other basic medical care until first responders arrive. During the course of their work, dispatchers utilize multiple monitors that provide information such as maps, call information, pertinent criminal history information, as well as video at times.

Dispatchers find themselves in stressful situations in which they must remain calm. Those going into this career must be aware that evenings, weekends, and holidays may be required as dispatchers are needed at all times. To become a police, fire, & ambulance dispatcher, also known as public safety telecommunicators, a high school diploma is usually required. There is a written exam and a typing test that must be passed and possible additional screenings/tests may be required. Additional training and certification may further be required depending on the state or locality you are working in. Two-way radios and computer aided dispatch software are two items that you will be trained on.

In May 2020, the annual median wage in this career was $43,290. Between 2019 and 2026 it is estimated that employment in this career will increase by 6%.

Source of information and to learn more about this career, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/police-fire-and-ambulance-dispatchers.htm (visited May 11, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - English & Spanish

Wilson Talent Center - Career Start program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 5/16/2021

Financial Managers

There are several types of financial managers, from credit managers, to risk managers, to insurance managers and so on. Their common goal is to make certain that the financial health of the organization they work for is in good shape. Financial managers are involved in investment decisions for their organization, along with preparing financial statements and forecasting reports for the financial goals of their organization.

Financial managers must collaborate with other departments to obtain the information necessary to be able to prepare the financial statements and forecasting information. As a financial manager, you are also expected to work with top executives in your organization to share your findings and assist with financial decisions. Whichever industry or organization you are a part of, there are regulations and tax laws that as a financial manager you will be expected to be familiar with. Those financial managers with a lot of experience could advance to become the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for an organization.

At a minimum, to get started as a financial manager, you will need a bachelor's degree and several years of experience in the financial field or business field. Majoring in finance, accounting, economics or business administration, all provide the option to work in the financial industry.

In May of 2020, the median annual wage for financial managers was $134,180. Between 2019 and 2029 it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 15%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Managers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/financial-managers.htm (visited April 26, 2021).

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Economics, Math courses including algebra

Livingston Career & Technical Center - Finance program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 5/09/2021

Phlebotomist

Drawing blood for tests, transfusions, research, or blood donations is the work of a phlebotomist. There are several facilities you will find phlebotomists working in. These include medical & diagnostic laboratories, doctor's offices, hospitals, and blood donation centers. Some phlebotomists travel to set up mobile donation centers in different areas, while others make home visits or travel to long-term care centers.

Compassion is a great quality to possess as a phlebotomist. Some patients are fearful of having their blood drawn; being able to show kindness and understanding can help in those situations. In addition to drawing a patient's blood, phlebotomists must confirm the patient's identity and input their information into a database. They must also know how to set up and maintain the medical supplies they use, as well as disinfect the workspace area to avoid spreading germs.

Professional certification is almost always preferred by employers. Programs for phlebotomy typically take under one year to complete and provide a certification at the end. These programs can be found at various vocational schools, technical schools, or at community colleges. As an attendee of these programs, you can expect to spend time in the classroom as well as receive training in the lab.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for phlebotomists was $36,320. Between 2019 and 2029 it is projected that employment for this career will increase by 17%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Phlebotomists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/phlebotomists.htm (visited April 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Human Anatomy & Physiology

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations & Capital Area Patient Care Technician (PCT) - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 5/02/2021

Athletic Trainers

When athletes experience muscle or bone injuries or illnesses, it is the job of an athletic trainer to diagnose and treat these conditions. Athletic trainers also work to prevent injuries before they occur. Tape, bandages, and braces are one way athletic trainers attempt to prevent injuries. When injuries do occur, athletic trainers must be able to recognize the injury and assess the extent of the injury. Putting into place a rehabilitation program for the injured athlete is another responsibility that falls on an athletic trainer, along with the reports and records that must be documented. Athletic trainers are also expected to administer first aid when necessary, as well as be able to provide emergency care.

As an athletic trainer, you can expect to be in contact with other healthcare personnel regarding injuries and illnesses and establishing treatment programs.

Athletic trainers have options when it comes to their working environment. You will find them working for educational institutions including high schools, colleges, and universities. Professional sports teams also employ athletic trainers, along with medical facilities and doctors offices.

If you are considering a career as an athletic trainer, at a minimum you will need to attain a bachelors degree. It is also very likely you will need either a license or certification depending upon the state in which you work.

In May, 2020 the median annual wage for athletic trainers was $49,860. Between 2019 and 2019 employment in this career is anticipated to grow by 16%!

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Athletic Trainers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/athletic-trainers.htm (visited April 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Anatomy, Physiology & Physics (as suggested by the U.S. Bureau of Statistics website)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations Program

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations program (Therapeutic Services)


Career of the Week - 4/25/2021

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers & Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Including Vascular Technologists

Each of these careers involves operating specialized imaging equipment for testing purposes or to create images. The outcome of this work assists physicians when trying to determine different medical conditions. Additional duties involved in these careers includes obtaining medical information from patients and preparing them for procedures, reviewing images to be certain the quality is adequate, along with being aware when images do not appear normal as one will need to summarize their findings to the physician.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers focus on the body's organs and tissues, whereas Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians focus on the heart and lungs. Each of these careers offers the opportunity to specialize in a certain area. From Abdominal Sonographers to Musculoskeletal Sonographers to Cardiographic or Electrocardiogram Technicians who specialize in EKG testing.

In 2019, most people in these careers were employed by local, state, and private hospitals. The majority of people in these careers also work full time. Time outside of normal business hours may be required as many facilities are open around the clock.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians was $59,100. For Diagnostic Medical Sonographers it was $75,920.

An associates degree or postsecondary certificate will be required to enter this field. Bachelor's degree programs are also offered. Professional certification may also be required.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medical-sonographers.htm (visited April 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Anatomy, Physiology, Physics & Math (as suggested by Bureau of Labor Statistics website)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program/class - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Health Care Foundations program/class - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 4/18/2021

Recreational Therapist

Recreational therapists use recreation-based treatment programs for their patients who may be disabled, injured or ill. Arts & crafts, music, dance, sports & games, and community outings are all ways recreational therapists help improve or support patients' physical, social, or emotional well-being. Whether it's working on social skills, improving confidence, working to reduce stress or anxiety, or regaining basic physical or mental abilities, this is all part of the job of a recreational therapist.

Recreational therapists must be able to assess patients' needs by observing them, reviewing documents and records, as well as communicating with relatives or other professionals . They must then develop a treatment plan and determine which therapeutic activities would support that plan and the patients' goals. Evaluating the effectiveness of the programs they created is also part of the job.

A bachelor's degree in recreational therapy or a related field of study is typically required. It is also a good idea to get certified. A Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) credential is available through the NCTRC. There are also different specialty areas of certification available including behavioral health and developmental disabilities.

In May 2020, the median annual wage for recreation therapists was $47,710. Employment in this career is projected to grow between 2019 and 2029, resulting in around 1700 new job openings during this time period.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Recreational Therapists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/recreational-therapists.htm (visited April 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare Foundations program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 4/12/2021

Construction Manager

Construction managers, also referred to as general contractors or project managers, provide planning, coordination and budgeting for construction projects, as well as supervise projects from beginning to end. This can involve preparing cost estimates, budgets, as well as timeframes for specific work to be done. Construction managers must also choose subcontractors and coordinate and schedule their portion of the project. In addition, construction managers must report progress and budget issues to the client they are working for, as well as handle any work delays, emergencies, or problems encountered during construction activities.

Most of the time a construction manager is found in a field office on the project's site. This allows managers to monitor the construction activities and make decisions onsite.

As a construction manager, you will be working alongside architects, civil engineers, as well as trades workers. Depending on the project, you may also be interacting with lawyers or government officials such as city inspectors, to verify that the work meets certain requirements.

There are differing paths to becoming a construction manager. If you prefer to work for a large construction firm, they may prefer you have a construction related bachelor's degree as well as work experience. Those who attain a construction related associates degree and have experience in the field may be more likely to supervise smaller projects. Those who have work experience and a high school diploma may be more likely to be self-employed as general contractor.

In May 2020, the annual median wage for construction managers was $97,180. It is projected that between 2019 and 2029, employment of construction managers will grow by 8%!

Source of information and to learn more about this occupation, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Construction Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/construction-managers.htm (visited April 09, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math classes

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Construction Trades Program & Business Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 4/05/2021

Surveyors

Making precise measurements to determine property boundaries is one job of a surveyor. The data they provide is used in engineering, map making, and construction projects. The data is also used to prevent or resolve disputes regarding property lines.

Surveyors may use different equipment depending upon the type of property being surveyed. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) uses satellites to locate reference points on the land with great accuracy. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allow surveyors to create maps, charts, and reports with the information they have on the land. This information helps determine where homes, roads, and landfills can be developed.

At times only one surveyor is needed to complete a job. For other projects it will be a team effort. As a surveyor, you may also be working with civil engineers, urban and regional planners, or landscape architects.

Being a surveyor means working outside in all sorts of weather. You may find yourself on your feet for long periods of time and most likely travel will be involved, possibly for longer time periods. Office work may also be involved, depending on the specific project.

If you are interested in becoming a surveyor, you will likely need a bachelor's degree. Bachelor degree programs are offered at some colleges and universities for students who want to take the path to become a licensed surveyor. Your state may require a bachelors degree from an ABET accredited school. To obtain your license after earning your bachelors degree, you will need several years experience working under a licensed surveyor.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for surveyors was $63,420. Between 2019 and 2029 a 2% increase in employment is expected for surveyors.

Source of information and to learn more about this occupation, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Surveyors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/surveyors.htm (visited March 11, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Math classes

Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technology Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Career of the Week - 3/21/2021

Dental & Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians & Medical Appliance Technician

Becoming a dental or ophthalmic laboratory technician, or a medical appliance technician means you will be spending your time creating, fitting, or repairing medical appliances and devices. A dental laboratory technician is one who uses impressions of teeth to make needed dentures, crowns, etc... An ophthalmic laboratory technician is one who makes eye glasses and contacts to fit the requested prescriptions. Medical appliance technicians are those who take supportive devices such as leg braces and provide necessary repairs or fixes to make sure it fits the patient correctly. Then there are those who actually create the supportive medical devices, and they are known as orthotic and prosthetic technicians.

To get started in one of these careers you will need a high school diploma. Many in this field learn through on the job training, although programs offering either an associates degree or certificate are available in dental laboratory technology.

Those considering a career in this area should be detail oriented as you will be reading prescriptions and work orders and will need to follow them accurately. Different tools are used in these careers to shape, bend, or polish the products, thus it is important that one has good dexterity. Even though you may not be working with actual patients, good interpersonal skills are important as you may be working as part of a team or communicating with dentists office for example.

Employment for dental & ophthalmic laboratory technicians & medical appliance technicians has been projected to grow by 9% between 2019 and 2029. In May 2019, the median annual wage for those in these careers was $37,370.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Dental and Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians and Medical Appliance Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/dental-and-ophthalmic-laboratory-technicians-and-medical-appliance-technicians.htm (visited March 19, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Science classes, Human Anatomy, Math, Computer Programming & Art classes

(as suggested by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website)


Career of the Week - 3/14/2021

Interior Designer

Interior Design is part of the Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications career cluster. Interior designers have many different responsibilities when it comes to making spaces safe, functional, and beautiful. Along with the responsibility of selecting items needed for the space and those that help create the desired look, interior designers must also know how to draw, read, and edit blueprints. Interior designers must also take into account such things as building codes and accessibility.

Interior Designers work with clients to determine their end vision of a space. They must estimate the cost of the project along with providing an estimated timeline of when the project will be completed. Interior designers typically present different lighting, flooring, furniture, and fixture options to their clients. They are responsible for ordering the furnishings and making sure they are installed correctly.

Most often interior designers use computer aided design (CAD) programs to create their drawings. Most in this career work in an office, but traveling to clients' sites is common. As an interior designer you can choose to specialize in a specific style or area, including kitchen and bath, healthcare facilities, corporate facilities, etc.

Typically a bachelors degree will be required for those going into this field, although there are associates degree programs and masters degree programs available as well. Whether or not you will need a license to work in this field is dependent upon the state you live and work in.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for interior designers was $56,040.

Artistic ability, creativity, problem-solving skills, as well as being detail oriented, are some of the important qualities for someone looking to enter this career field.

Source of information and to learn more, visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Interior Designers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/arts-and-design/interior-designers.htm (visited March 02, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:


High School - Art classes (that incorporate drawing)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Arts & Communications program, Engineering/Computer Aided Design Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Career of the Week - 3/07/2021

Chemical Engineer

Using chemistry, math, physics and biology to solve problems having to do with the production or use of food, fuel, drugs and other products is the work of a chemical engineer.

Chemical engineers work with large scale manufacturing operations and work on designing the equipment and processes that will be used, along with designing and planning the layout of it all. They need to conduct testing and monitor performance to ensure things are operating smoothly and according to plan. Ensuring the equipment and processes used are compliance with safety and environmental regulations is another duty of a chemical engineer. Providing an estimation of production costs to management is yet another duty that may be involved.

Specialization in a particular process, field, or product is also an option in this career path.

Although chemical engineers mostly work in offices or laboratories, there may be times they must travel to a site to solve problems or monitor and direct operations. Yet, other engineers will find themselves traveling much more frequently to plants or worksites.

If you are interested in becoming a chemical engineer, you will need a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering or something similar. Programs are likely to include learning in the classroom, lab, and out in the field. Internships and cooperative programs may also be offered through some colleges and universities.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for chemical engineers was $108,770. Between 2019 and 2029 it is estimated that employment will grow by 4% for this career.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Chemical Engineers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/chemical-engineers.htm (visited March 02, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - As recommended by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics - chemistry, physics, biology, math (including algebra, trigonometry and calculus)

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Engineering/Computer Aided Design - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center - Engineering Technologies Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/wtc-programs/

Livingston Early College - Engineering Technologist - Manufacturing - http://lcearlycollege.org/


Career of the Week - 2/28/2021

Interpreters & Translators


Converting written information from one language to another is the job of a translator. Converting sign or spoken language from one language to another is the job of an interpreter. It is possible to do both of these jobs, but these are in fact two separate professions.

There is more involved with these two careers than simply converting words or signs from one language to another. One should be able to accurately communicate the style & tone used by the writer or speaker. One should also have knowledge about the culture, which will allow you to accurately portray the meaning of the message you are relaying. Speaking, writing, and reading fluently in at least two languages is typical for an interpreter or translator.

Being an interpreter provides the opportunity to work in many different work environments including courtrooms, hospitals, schools, detention facilities, conferences centers, etc. Translators are more likely to work in an office environment or remotely. They may receive and submit work electronically.

If you would like to pursue a career as an interpreter or translator you will need a bachelor's degree, as well as being proficient in at least two languages, where one of the languages is usually English.

Employment in these two careers is expected to grow 20% between 2019 and 2029, and the median annual wage in May 2019 was $51,830.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Interpreters and Translators,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/interpreters-and-translators.htm (visited February 10, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Foreign Language and English Writing & Comprehension


Career of the Week - 2/21/2021

Human Resource Specialists

(Human Resource Generalists & Recruitment Specialists)

Recruiting, screening, interviewing, and placing workers is all part of the job of Human Resource Specialists. Other job duties may also be involved including those having to do with employee relations, pay & benefits, and helping to train new hires.

A human resource generalist typically works in an office during normal business hours. A recruitment specialist (also called a head hunter), works to hire employees on behalf of another organization. Someone is this role will likely find themselves traveling to job fairs and college campuses to meet potential job candidates.

Someone looking to go into this career field should be a good communicator as they will be required to interview and listen to potential job candidates. They must also have great interpersonal skills and be able to work well with others. Good decision making skills is another quality one should possess.

Generally a bachelor's degree will be required in human resources, business, or a similar field. Certifications are also available to showcase one's expertise in the field. These certifications are typically not required, but may increase ones chance of getting hired.

In May, 2019, the median annual wage for human resource specialists was $61,920. It has been projected that between 2019 and 2019, employment in this career is expected to increase by 7%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Human Resources Specialists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/human-resources-specialists.htm (visited February 10, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Business Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 2/14/2021

Occupational Therapy Assistant & Aide

Occupational therapy assistants help patients recover, improve, or be able to continue to use skills that are needed to work or in daily life. Occupational therapy aides are there to provide support activities. Both of these careers are working under the supervision on an occupational therapist.

Treatment plans are needed for each patient. An occupational assistant works with the occupational therapist to develop these for each patient. Teaching patients how to stretch their muscles properly, or use special equipment to make their life easier are part of the job. Working on coordination or socialization for those with developmental disabilities can also be part of the job. Records need to be kept for each patient and it is the responsibility of the occupational therapy assistant to communicate patients progress to the occupational therapist.

Occupational aides are usually involved in tasks related to preparing for patients arrival, such as setting up the therapy equipment to be used. They also clean used equipment and the treatment area after appointments, as well as assist with billing and insurance, setting up appointments, and answering phones.

Typically occupational therapy assistants and aides work full time. Evenings and weekends could be required.

An associates degree from an accredited occupational assistant therapy program is needed to become an occupational therapy assistant. You can look for these programs at community colleges or technical schools.

To become an occupational therapy aide, one needs a high school diploma (or equivalent), and training is provided on the job.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for occupational therapy assistants was $61,510, and $29,230 for occupational therapy aides.

Growth has been projected for both of these careers between 2019 and 2029.


Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapy-assistants-and-aides.htm (visited January 30, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Biology & Health classes

Wilson Talent Center - Healthcare program (year two option for Therapeutic Services) - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston Career & Technical Education -Health Occupations Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 2/08/2021

Aircraft & Avionics Equipment Mechanics & Technicians

If you would enjoy repairing aircraft parts, providing scheduled maintenance on aircrafts, and conducting inspections on aircraft, then this might be the right career for you! Work performed in these careers can take place in hangars, repair stations, as well as on airfields.

A few of the duties within these careers include:

  • Diagnosing issues such as mechanical or electrical problems, or in the case of avionics technicians, working to identify performance problems or malfunctions.

  • Removing & replacing parts that become defective or parts that are malfunctioning.

  • Testing aircraft parts using the appropriate testing equipment, or in the case of avionics technicians, testing electronic instruments.

This career path provides the option to specialize in one area or system of a specific aircraft, or provides the option to work on several different types of aircraft.

Most often those in the positions of aircraft mechanic or technician get started by attending a Part 147 FAA - approved aviation maintenance technician school. Here they earn a certificate of completion that is accepted by the FFA in lieu of having the required experience.

If you are interested in becoming an avionic technician, it is likely you will need to obtain an associates degree. Avionics technicians are dealing with complex systems which require knowledge of how the flight instruments work and how to repair them.

In May 2019, the annual median wage for aircraft mechanics and service technicians was $64,090, while it was $65,700 for avionics technicians.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited January 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

Wilson Talent Center - Aviation Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Career of the Week - 2/01/2021

Respiratory Therapist

Having a career as a respiratory therapist means providing care for persons who have breathing issues. Persons in need of a respiratory therapist may be suffering from a chronic respiratory disease like asthma or emphysema, or those needing emergency care such as persons who have experienced a heart attack, drowning or shock. Respiratory therapists can provide care for all ages.

Respiratory therapists perform a variety of tasks: running various tests on their patients, connecting patients to a ventilator when necessary, communicating with medical personnel to put together treatment plans for patients, documenting patient progress, and providing treatment to patients, among others.

Respiratory therapists can work in hospitals or other medical buildings, but it's also possible to provide in-home care for patients.

To become a respiratory therapist one needs at least an associates degree, although a bachelor's degree may be preferred by employers. Many states also require that one be licensed.

In May, 2019, the annual median wage for respiratory therapists was $61,330.

Source of information and to learn more, visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Respiratory Therapists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm (visited January 14, 2021).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Health classes, biology classes, math, chemistry and physics

Wilson Talent Center - Health Foundations & Therapeutic Services - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Sciences program & Health Occupations program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Career of the Week - 1/24/2021

Film & Video Editors and Camera Operators

Working on the set of television programs, movies, music videos, sporting events, and news broadcasts, all falls within careers in film & video editing and camera operators. Work can be done in studios or an office setting, but many times raw footage is filmed on location.

If you are leaning toward the editing side, you should enjoy working on a computer and enjoy using editing software.

If you are interested in operating a camera, there are specific types of camera operators. Those who film motion pictures are referred to as cinematographers. Those who film their subjects from a fixed position inside a studio are known as studio camera operators, and those whos work is filming private ceremonies or special events are known as videographers.

Typical duties of film & video editors and camera operators include:

  • Collaborating with directors to make sure the director's vision is being captured.

  • Using your expertise in filming and editing to improve scenes.

  • Organizing digital footage using editing software.

  • Selecting the appropriate lighting and lenses for specific scenes.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for camera operators, television, video and film was $55,160. For film and video editors it was $63,780.

Typically these positions are going to require a bachelor's degree. Communications is one such area one can study.

Looking ahead to the future, employment of film and video editors is expected to grow by 22% between 2019 and 2029. During this same time period the employment of camera operators is expected to grow by 14%.

Source of information and to learn more, visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Film and Video Editors and Camera Operators,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/film-and-video-editors-and-camera-operators.htm (visited January 14, 2021).

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career field:

High School - Communications Through Digital Media I & II, News Broadcasting, & Sports Broadcasting

Wilson Talent Center - New Media I & II - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Career of the Week - 1/17/2021

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) & Paramedic

In these careers you will be responding to emergency calls, providing medical services, and transporting patients to medical facilities.

Most in this field work full time schedules. One should be aware that this type of work can be stressful as well as physically demanding. Life or death situations are part of the job.

Some of the duties involved in these careers include:

  • Providing emergency medical assistance to those who call 911.

  • Determining a patient's condition and knowing what treatment steps to take.

  • Communication with healthcare/hospital staff on the status, observations made, and treatments provided to the patient while in their care.

  • Documenting the medical care that was provided to the patient.

Completion of a post-secondary program is the typical route to becoming an EMT (paramedics may need associates degree). To be accepted into one of these programs you typically must have a high school diploma or equivalent. A cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification (CPR) is also usually required. These are non-degree programs and many take less than one year to complete, although some can take up to two years. Becoming an EMT or paramedic also requires that one be licensed in their state (requirements vary by state).

In May 2019, the median annual wage for EMT's and Paramedics was $35,400.

Between 2019 and 2026, these careers are projected to grow by 6%.

Source of information and to learn more visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, EMTs and Paramedics,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm (visited December 25, 2020).

Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Emergency Medical Technician Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

High School course - Anatomy & physiology


Career of the Week - 1/10/2021

Computer Support Specialist & Computer Network Specialist

Providing help and advice to users and organizations is the job of a computer support specialist & computer network specialist.

Computer user support specialists, also called help-desk technicians, provide technical help to non-IT users. This involves diagnosing problems by asking the user questions and walking users through the process of fixing the issues. In this position you may also train users to use new software or hardware, among other duties.

If you are a computer network specialist, also called a technical support specialist, your focus will be on testing and evaluating network systems, ensuring networks are operating correctly by performing routine maintenance, and providing troubleshooting for both networks and internet systems.

While computer network specialists work for and maintain a specific organization's network, help-desk technicians have the option of working for large software companies or for support service firms where they provide guidance to business customers on specific programs designed to be used in their particular field. Another option for them is to work in a call center where you are working with non-business customers and answering less complicated IT questions.

Full-time work schedules are common for computer support specialists, but because businesses may need to have support available 24-7, many support specialists work nights or weekends.

While some jobs will require a bachelor's degree, others may only require an associates degree or completion of postsecondary classes. Some important qualities for those interested in this career field include possessing good listening and problem-solving skills, along with strong speaking and writing skills.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for computer network specialists was $63,460, and $52,270 for computer user support specialists.

Source of information and to learn more visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Support Specialists,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-support-specialists.htm (visited December 20, 2020).


Programs/classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Programming & Mobile Applications - Wilson Talent Center - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Computer Network Engineering - Livingston Career & Technical Education - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Computer Programming - Livingston Career & Technical Education - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

High School - AP Computer Science Principles


Career of the Week - 1/03/2021

Agricultural & Food Scientists

Working as an agricultural & food scientist involves researching ways to improve the efficiency and safety of food products and agricultural establishments. Work is performed in laboratories, offices, as well as out in the field. The work in this field is vital to maintaining our food supply and improving & expanding upon it.

This field offers different areas of focus. One can become an animal scientist and focus on research of domestic farm animals. You will look at animal genetics, nutrition, reproduction, diseases, and growth and development, with food production as your primary focus. Food scientists & technologists use chemistry, biology, and other sciences in their study of food. A couple areas they focus on include trying to find ways to make processed foods safe and healthy, while also seeking to discover new food sources. This type of work can also involve inspecting food processing areas and enforcing government regulations. A third type of agricultural and food scientist is a plant scientist. Plant scientists are working to improve crop yields and they communicate with food & crop developers regarding ways to improve their production. Soil scientists look at the make up of soil and how it affects plant and crop growth.

There are several employers of agricultural and food scientists. These include private industry, such as food production companies, farms and processing plants. Pharmaceutical companies are another employer of those in this field. Here one can develop medicine, medical products, or look for alternative ways to use food products, such as for fuels. Agricultural and food scientists can also work for universities where they conduct research and investigation related to improving areas such as animal or soil health. The federal government is yet another employer of those in this field.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for agricultural & food scientists was $65,160. Between 2019 and 2029 employment in this field is expected to grow 6%.

At a minimum one needs a bachelor's degree to get into this field, but many go on to get advanced degrees. Depending on what state you are in, you may be required to be licensed if working as a soil scientist. Beyond this, certifications are usually not required, although they are available and can help enhance ones career.

Source of information and to learn more please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Agricultural and Food Scientists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/agricultural-and-food-scientists.htm (visited December 15, 2020).


Programs/classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Bioscience Careers offered through the Wilson Talent Center: https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Agriscience/Botany/Zoology (offered at FHS through Livingston Career & Technical Education): http://www.livingstoncte.org/

High school biology courses, chemistry courses, agricultural science: earth science, and botany/zoology.

Career of the Week - 12/13/2020

Social Worker

If you enjoy working with others and would like to help people, this career path may be a good fit for you!

Helping people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives is the work of a social worker. If you want to diagnose and treat mental, behavioral, and emotional issues, you will need to become a clinical social worker and attain the additional education required, experience, and licensing required.

Social work not only involves helping people in their everyday lives, it also involves advocacy for the profession and for clients at the local, state, and national levels.

A typical day for a social worker might include the following:

  • Talking with clients to determine their needs, situations, and what their goals are.

  • Assisting clients in coping with change and challenging circumstances in their lives.

  • Keeping track of case files and records for their clients.

  • Intervening in crisis situations.

  • Working to improve their client's well being by working to get assistance where needed, such as food stamps or healthcare.

There are different areas of social work one can specialize in depending upon the specific work or clientele that one wants to be involved with.

These include:

  • Child & family social workers

  • School social workers

  • Healthcare social workers

  • Mental health and substance abuse social workers

Social work is typically full time work where weekends, evenings, holidays, and being on call may be part of the job.

If you want to pursue a career as a social worker, attaining a bachelor's degree in social work is the most common route to obtaining an entry-level administrative position. Bachelor's degrees in related fields such as psychology or sociology may also be acceptable to some employers. Most states will also require licensing as well.

In May, 2019, the annual median wage for social workers was $50,470. Although the growth in this career will vary upon specialization, employment for this career is expected to grow 13% between 2019 and 2029.

Possessing emotional skills, good communication skills, and effective problem solving skills, are all qualities that will help social workers to be effective.

Source of information and to learn more visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social Workers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/social-workers.htm (visited November 19, 2020).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Psychology courses in high school


Career of the Week - 12/06/2020

Mechanical Engineer

Mechanical engineering involves research, design, building & testing. Those in this career perform many tasks and can specialize in certain areas. They design and oversee the manufacture of many products including auto parts, medical equipment, food products, etc... Their job also involves designing machines. From machines that produce power to accomplish goals, such as generators and steam & gas turbines, to those that use power, including air-conditioning systems and refrigeration systems. Other design projects can include things like conveyor systems and automated transfer stations.

Some other duties involved in this career include the following:

  • Using analysis and computer-aided design to design or redesign devices or systems.

  • Looking in to equipment failure or issues to diagnose problems and offer remedies.

  • Developing and testing prototypes for devices they have designed.

  • Analyzing test results for prototypes and making necessary changes.

You can typically find mechanical engineers working in an office. When a problem arises or a piece of equipment needs their expertise, they may visit a worksite.

If you are interested in becoming a mechanical engineer, you will want to look at a bachelor's degree in either mechanical engineering or mechanical engineering technology. A license from the state will also be required if you plan on selling services to the public.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for mechanical engineers was $88,430. Between 2019 and 2029 employment for this career is expected to grow by 4%.

Staying current with advancing technology is important if you plan on getting into this field. Possessing certain skills like creativity, listening skills, and problem-solving skills are also important in this field. You should also enjoy working as part of a team if you plan on entering this field. It is likely you will be collaborating with other engineers, engineering techs, and other professionals.

Source of information and to learn more visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mechanical Engineers,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineers.htm (visited November 14, 2020).

Also search "industrial engineer" in XELLO for more information. https://www.fowlervilleschools.org/for-students/


Programs/classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Math and physical science classes while in high school

Engineering Technologies program through the Wilson Talent Center - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Engineering/Computer Aided Design program through Livingston CTE - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Robotics/Mechatronics program through Livingston CTE - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Attending a summer engineering camp is another idea.

Career of the Week - 11/29/2020

Dental Hygienist

Almost all dental hygienists work in dentists' offices and provide preventative care for patients, as well as examine patients for signs of oral diseases, like gingivitis. Many in this profession work part time.

Some of the typical duties for a dental hygienist include the following:

  • To help protect teeth, they apply sealants and fluorides.

  • They remove tarter, stains, and plaque from teeth.

  • Dental hygienists take and develop dental x-rays and check for tooth and/or jaw problems.

  • They assess patients' oral health and communicate their findings to the dentist.

  • They remove stains with an air-polishing device.

To attain this career, typically one will need an associates degree in dental hygiene. Programs can often be found in community colleges, technical schools and universities. These programs are usually a combination of laboratory, clinical and classroom instruction. Areas of study include anatomy, medical ethics, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease.

It typically takes three years to complete these programs and you will also need to be licensed by your state. If you would like the option to conduct research, teach, or provide clinical practice in public or school health programs, you will need to obtain a bachelor's and possibly a master's degree.

In May 2019 the median annual pay for dental hygienists was $76,220. Employment for this career has been projected to grow 6% between 2019 and 2029. As the baby-boom population ages, it is expected that demand for dental services will also increase.

It is also expected that opportunities will be best for those willing to work under forty hours a week, and for those willing to work in underserved areas.

If you are interested in this career, you will want to take biology, chemistry and math classes while in high school.

Source of information and to learn more visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Dental Hygienists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm (visited November 21, 2020).


Programs/classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

While in high school - biology, AP biology, chemistry, AP chemistry & math courses

Health Occupations class through Livingston CTE - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Health Care Foundations class through the Wilson Talent Center - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 11/22/2020

Actuary

Analyzing the financial costs of risk and uncertainty is the job of an actuary. Actuaries work to determine the risk of potential events occurring by compiling information and then using advanced statistics and modeling software to forecast the probability of an event occurring, and what the possible costs of the event are. They help businesses and clients develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk.

The majority of actuaries work for insurance companies and their work is crucial for the industry.

Actuaries also assist in developing insurance policies and prices to be charged for those policies. They want to be sure premiums will be profitable, but also competitive in the marketplace.

Typically actuaries specialize in one area such as health insurance, life insurance, or property & casualty insurance. Yet there are other opportunities as well. One could act in the capacity of a consultant and work on a contract basis, auditing the work of internal actuaries.

Another opportunity is to work as an Enterprise risk actuary and help businesses determine risks that may affect their short-term or long-term objectives. In this role you assist top executives in determining how much risk the business is willing to take and come up with strategies to respond to these issues.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for actuaries was $108,350. Employment of actuaries is projected to grow 18% between 2019 and 2029 due to new emerging risks.

A bachelor's degree is needed for this career. Typically this will be in mathematics, actuarial science, statistics, or some other analytical field. Coursework must also be completed in economics, applied statistics and corporate finance. You must also pass a series of exams to become a certified professional.

Source of information and to learn more visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Actuaries,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/actuaries.htm (visited November 21, 2020).


Programs/Classes to consider if you are interested in this career:

Math, statistics, marketing/business, & writing classes in high school (possible dual enrollment opportunities for college level courses)

DECA - https://www.deca.org/ - See Mrs. Loughman for additional details

The Business & Risk Management program through Wilson Talent Center - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

The Finance program through Livingston CTE (specifically accounting) - http://www.livingstoncte.org/cte-programs-2/finance/

The Computer Programming courses offered through Livingston CTE - http://www.livingstoncte.org/cte-programs-2/finance/

Livingston Early College - Data Analytics Program - http://lcearlycollege.org/


Career of the Week - 11/15/2020

Accountant or Auditor

Accountants and auditors prepare and examine financial records.

There are different types of accountants and auditors with different concentrations.

In general, a few tasks accountants and auditors perform include:

  • Examining financial statements. These statements must be accurate and comply with laws and regulations.

  • Assessing financial operations, identifying risks and challenges, and making best-practice suggestions to management.

  • Inspecting accounting systems and account books for efficiency, while checking for the use of accepted accounting procedures.

Government Accountants are employed by the government and maintain and examine the records of government agencies and those businesses and individuals who are subject to government regulation or taxation. Another avenue is to become a Public Accountant, where your clients include corporations, governments, individuals and non-profits. If you want to guide business decision making, then becoming a Management Accountant may be of interest.

When it comes to having a career as an auditor, there are also different pathways. An Internal Auditor works for the organization they are auditing. They find ways to improve processes for finding and eliminating different risks to the business including waste, fraud, and other financial risk. External Auditors are employed by an outside organization. They review clients' financial statements and perform the necessary outside and internal reporting that statements have been correctly prepared and reported. An Information Technology (IT) Auditor focuses on their organization's IT system and ensures that both financial and nonfinancial data come from a reliable source.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for accountants and auditors was $71,550.

These careers typically require a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field. Attaining certification in a specific field of accounting, such as becoming a licensed Certified Public Accountant (CPA), may open up more job opportunities.

It may be possible to get started in this field with only an associates degree. An employer can have set education and experience requirements which may allow you to attain junior accounting positions.

Source of information and to learn more, visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Accountants and Auditors,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/accountants-and-auditors.htm (visited November 05, 2020).


Programs/classes to consider if you are interested in either of these careers:

BST Core - FHS

Advanced BST/Advanced Computer Applications - FHS

Marketing I & II - FHS

Livingston CTE Business Class: http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Livingston CTE Business & Marketing Class: http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/

Wilson Talent Center Business & Risk Management Class: https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/wtc-programs/


Career of the Week - 11/08/2020

PLUMBERS, PIPEFITTERS & STEAMFITTERS

Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair piping fixtures and systems. All have specific duties, but often similar duties as well.

Plumbers typically install and repair water, gas, and other piping systems in homes, buildings and factories. Pipefitters and steamfitters on the other hand, install and maintain pipes which may carry chemicals, acids and gases. Their work is mostly in manufacturing, commercial and industrial settings.

All three of these careers:

  • Read blueprints and follow state and local building codes

  • Prepare cost estimates for customers

  • Install pipes and fittings that carry water, gas, and other fluids or substances

  • Determine needed materials & equipment for a job

  • Test pipes & pressure to ensure that a pipe system is airtight and watertight

The majority of those employed in these occupations learn on the job through an apprenticeship. It is also an option to attend a vocational/technical school. Licenses may also be required by the state you live in.

Plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters who complete an apprenticeship and pass the required licensing exam achieve journey-level status. Journey-level workers are qualified to complete tasks independently. From here, additional licensing or certification may be available to expand career opportunities or qualify you for certain types of work.

In 2019, the largest employer of plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters, accounting for 65% of those employed, were plumbing, heating and air-conditioning contractors.

$55,160 was the median annual wage for these occupations in May 2019.

These three occupations landed on "Michigan's Hot 50 Job Outlook Through 2028". This document indicates an hourly wage range of $21-$38, with a 7.4% growth rate from 2018 - 2028. https://milmi.org/Research/michigans-hot-50-through-2028

Source of information and to learn more visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters,at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/plumbers-pipefitters-and-steamfitters.htm (visited November 04, 2020).


If you are interested in this career, consider the following programs while in high school!

Wilson Talent Center - Construction Technologies Program - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston CTE - Construction Trades Program - http://www.livingstoncte.org/home-2/


Career of the Week - 11/01/2020

PARALEGAL OR LEGAL ASSISTANT

Paralegals and legal assistants perform a variety of tasks to support lawyers. They help lawyers prepare for hearings, trials, and corporate meetings. Their work involves drafting documents, conducting legal research, and maintaining and organizing files.

Specific duties can depend on the area of law in which paralegals work, but duties can include:

  • Investigating and gathering facts on a case

  • Writing or summarizing reports for lawyers to prepare for trial

  • Gathering statements and obtaining affidavits, which might be used as evidence in court

  • Contacting clients, lawyers, witnesses and others to schedule interviews, meetings, and depositions

Most paralegals work for law firms, but corporate legal departments and government agencies are options as well.

Paralegals usually work full time and may have to work additional hours to meet deadlines.

Most in this profession are going to obtain an associates degree or a certificate in paralegal studies. Some obtain a bachelor's degree in an unrelated field and obtain a certificate in paralegal studies. It's also possible to get hired with a bachelor's degree and no specialized education or legal experience, but rather get trained on the job.

In May 2019, the median annual wage for paralegals and legal assistants was $51,740.

This career made the list on "Michigan's Hot 50 Job Outlook through 2028." The outlook for this career shows that it is expected to grow 9.1% between 2018 and 2028. Source: https://milmi.org/Research/category/michigans-hot-50-jobs

Source of information and to learn more please visit:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Paralegals and Legal Assistants, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/paralegals-and-legal-assistants.htm


Are you interested in this career? If so, consider the Criminal Justice program through the Wilson Talent Center. This is a one to two year program that can be completed while in high school - see the details at https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/


Career of the Week - 10/25/2020

HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATOR/MEDICAL & HEALTH SERVICE MANAGERS

Medical and health services managers, also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators, plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. Options include managing an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians (doctors office).

Medical and health services managers must stay current on healthcare laws, regulations, and technology.

Some of the duties involved with this position include:

  • Working to improve the efficiency and quality of healthcare systems

  • Recruiting, training and supervising staff

  • Preparing and monitoring budgets and spending to ensure departments are operating within funding limits

  • Developing goals and objectives for the department or facility

A bachelor's degree is most common for medical and health services managers to have before entering the field. It is also common to have a master's degree in this field. Many in this position have work experience in an administrative or clinical role in a hospital or other healthcare facility as well

In May 2019, the median annual wage for medical and health service managers was $100,980.

In 2019, most medical and health service managers worked for state, local and private hospitals. The second largest employer was offices of physicians, and then nursing and residential care facilities.

The job outlook for this career has employment projected to grow 32 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Source of information and to learn more please visit: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm

Also refer to XELLO and search, "Health Care Administrator" under careers, for additional information.

Programs to look into while in high school:

Wilson Talent Center - Health Care Foundations, Capital Area Patient Care Technician (PCT), Therapeutic Services - https://www.inghamisd.org/wtc/

Livingston Career & Technical Education - Health Occupations & Emergency Medical Technician - http://www.livingstoncte.org/

Livingston Early College - Career Ladder Nursing Program - http://lcearlycollege.org/