Research

Research in Progress


Chapman, Lennay M.,  Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs. "More Than Just Your Name: Public Donations Drive Inferences of Egoistic and Altruistic Motives," Under second-round review at Psychology & Marketing.


Abstract: Is donating publicly (i.e., with one’s name displayed) a sign of egoistic or altruistic motives? The present research shows that people think public (vs. anonymous) donations are a sign of egoistic motives, such as wanting to impress others. At the same time, they infer that public donations are a sign of altruistic motives, such as wanting to encourage others to follow suit and donate. These inferences have downstream effects on people’s own charitable donations. Seeing public donations as egoistically motivated decreases people’s donations because they view donors as less communal. Yet seeing public donations as altruistically motivated increases people’s donations because they view donors as more communal. These effects occur in the context of $100 and $10 public donations (Study 1) and impact real contributions of money (Study 2) and volunteer work (Study 3). Study 4 showed that platform managers can strengthen inferences of altruistic motives by communicating that public donations can motivate others to give. Together, these findings enhance understanding of how public forms of giving influence others to donate, which has practical implications for donation platform managers.


Chapman, Lennay M.,  Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs.  "Just Between You and Me: Paying Privately Signals Communal Traits and Enhances Others’ Willingness to Cooperate," Under first-round review at the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing.


Abstract: Increasingly, consumers’ everyday interactions are facilitated by online platforms. One notable feature of many online platforms is that they give consumers the ability to interact with other consumers privately or publicly. The present work examines decisions about interacting privately or publicly with others in the context of peer-to-peer financial transactions. The authors propose that choosing a private mode of transacting represents a socially mindful behavior, as it preserves partners’ future ability to keep private or disclose the transaction details. Partners, recognizing private payment as a socially mindful behavior, infer private (vs. public) payment initiators to possess stronger communal traits, and expect that they will be more likely to cooperate. On the basis of these inferences, partners themselves become more likely to cooperate. Consumers also use the decision to transact privately to signal their own communal orientation, expecting it may encourage cooperation in others. Nine studies conducted both in the United States and Europe support these propositions.


Khan, Abdul Wahid, Abhishek Mishra, and Lennay M. Chapman. "Psychological ownership of AI: A conceptual framework," Under first-round review at AMS Review.


Abstract: Consumers increasingly use products and services enabled by artificial intelligence (AI) in their everyday lives. Psychological ownership (PO), a feeling that something is “mine,” is developed by consumers for various targets and has beneficial outcomes for firms. While past research has investigated consumers’ PO of AI-enabled intelligent offerings (e.g., robots, autonomous products), how consumers develop PO of the AI algorithm that powers these intelligent offerings remains unanswered. AI’s autonomy, agency, and intelligence presents unique challenges and opportunities for developing PO. This paper conceptualizes consumers’ PO of AI by synthesizing literature across marketing, psychology, and human-computer interaction. Our comprehensive conceptual framework explains how consumers develop PO of AI through four fundamental mechanisms (mediators, moderators), and the positive and negative antecedents, and outcomes of PO. Crucially, we identify mechanisms that may explain decline in consumers’ PO of AI. This framework contributes to the psychological ownership literature by extending it into the context of AI. It also has practical implications for marketers, and suggests they can improve consumers’ PO of AI through strategic product design, advertising, and targeting decisions. 


Chapman, Lennay M.David Luna, Ana Valenzuela, and Scott Schanke. "A Chatbot’s Language Can Undermine Consumer Trust," Manuscript in preparation. 


Abstract: Artificial intelligence-enabled chatbots hold the potential to enhance customer service, assist in information acquisition, and increase sales. Yet consumer-oriented chatbots are especially vulnerable to human-induced bias in language, as their dialog is generated directly by human creators. The present work investigates how consumers respond when a chatbot’s language contains linguistic cues associated with deception. A pilot study and four experiments show that the presence of two linguistic deception markers (emphatic markers and low lexical diversity) within a chatbot’s language negatively impacts purchase intentions and willingness to provide information (e.g. an email address). We provide process evidence showing that diminished trust mediates the relationship between linguistic deception markers and reduced purchase intentions. Additionally, this work provides an empirical paradigm to test the effects of language in service interactions, since chatbots provide a way to abstract linguistic factors from the physical characteristics of the interaction.


Chapman, Lennay M. and Farnoush Reshadi. "Generating Insult from Injury: Receiving Self-Improvement Gifts Causes Negative Word of Mouth." Manuscript in preparation.


Abstract: Consumers sometimes give self improvement products (e.g., Fitbits, self help books) as gifts. Although self improvement products are popular self purchases, gifting them could convey criticism, with negative downstream consequences for the firms selling them. Four preregistered studies show that recipients of self improvement (vs. non improvement) gifts experience irritation and cope with this feeling through negative word of mouth, for example, by giving the products lower star ratings or upvoting others’ negative reviews. These effects persist even when an alternative coping mechanism is salient (e.g., the option to exchange or return the gift). However, the effects are attenuated when the self improvement product is designed to enhance an existing strength rather than restore a deficiency. The findings presented here contribute to the theoretical knowledge of consumer psychology in gift giving, while offering a practical warning to firms who may be tempted to advertise their self improvement products as gifts.

Refereed Conference Special Sessions:


Chapman, Lennay M., Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs (March, 2023), Technology-Mediated Morality: Moral, Ethical, and Fairness Judgments Arising from Technological Contexts. Society for Consumer Psychology (San Juan, Puerto Rico).


Valenzuela, Ana and Lennay M. Chapman (October, 2021), When Cash is no longer King: On the Unintended Consequences of Digital Financial Platforms. Association for Consumer Research (virtual).


Valenzuela, Ana and Lennay M. Chapman (October, 2021), “Device-dependencies”: How Smartphone use affects Consumer Beliefs and Choices. Association for Consumer Research (virtual).

Refereed Paper Presentations (underline denotes presenter):

Chapman, Lennay M., Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs (March, 2023), More than Just Your Name: Public Donations May Signal both Prosocial and Pro-Self Motives. Society for Consumer Psychology conference, San Juan, PR.

Chapman, Lennay M., David Luna, Ana Valenzuela and Scott Schanke (October, 2022), Is that chatbot lying to me? The effects of linguistic markers in chatbot interactions. Association for Consumer Research, Denver, CO.

Chapman, Lennay M., Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs (March, 2022), Just between you and me: Private Transactions Signal Communal Traits and   Enhance Others’ Willingness to Cooperate. Society for Consumer Psychology conference (virtual).

Chapman, Lennay M., David Luna, Ana Valenzuela and Scott Schanke (March, 2022), Linguistic Markers of Deception: How a Chatbot’s Language Can Undermine Behavior and Trust. Society for Consumer Psychology conference (virtual).

Chapman, Lennay M. and Ana Valenzuela (October, 2021), Just between you and me: Private Transactions Signal Moral Traits and Enhance Others’ Willingness to Cooperate. Association for Consumer Research (virtual).

Chapman, Lennay M. and Ana Valenzuela (October, 2021), The Addictive Properties of Mobile Applications: How Endless Scrolling and Intermittent Notifications Impact Consumer Perceptions and Behavior. Association for Consumer Research (virtual).

Refereed Poster Presentations (underline denotes presenter):

Chapman, Lennay M. and Farnoush Reshadi (February, 2024), Generating Insult from Injury: Receiving Self-Improvement Gifts Causes Negative Word of Mouth. AMA Winter Conference, St. Pete Beach, FL.

Khan, Abdul Wahid, Abhishek Mishra, and Lennay M. Chapman (February, 2024), The AI is Mine! Conceptualizing Psychological Ownership of AI. AMA Winter Conference, St. Pete Beach, FL.

Chapman, Lennay M., Ana Valenzuela, and Kathleen D. Vohs (November, 2022), Just between you and me: Private Transactions Signal Communal Traits and   Enhance Others’ Willingness to Cooperate. Society for Judgment and Decision Making, San Diego, CA.


Chapman, Lennay M. and Ana Valenzuela (March, 2021). Just between you and me: Paying privately signals moral traits and enhances others' willingness to cooperate. Society for Consumer Psychology (virtual).

 

Chapman, Lennay M. and Kathleen D. Vohs (March, 2021). Phones and selves: Self-Smartphone Overlap, Online Self-Disclosure, And Privacy Concerns. Society for Consumer Psychology (virtual).

Non-Refereed Publications:


Anand, Divya and Lennay M. Chapman (2021, May 4). “Using Micro Influencers for Customer Engagement? Seek the Ones that Follow Few Others,” JMR Scholarly Insights.


Chapman, Lennay M. (2017, September 15). "Putting Under Armour in the “SWOT-light," The Motley Fool. 


Chapman, Lennay M. (2017, August 26). "Kohl’s faces the challenges of omnichannel retailing," The Motley Fool.


Chapman, Lennay M. (2017, August 14). "Where is Under Armour finding growth?," The Motley Fool. 


Chapman, Lennay M. (2017, August 3). "One Important Thing Kohl's is Doing Right," The Motley Fool.  


Chapman, Lennay M. (2017, July 28). "What Kohl’s management doesn’t want shareholders to focus on," The Motley Fool.