This is the "small" mural in the ex-Firestone Administration Building.*


FIRESTONE TIRE COMPANY MURALS--SOUTHGATE, CA



Title of Installation:                                                                                        

Firestone Tire Company Murals                                                                                        

 
Materials Used:

Gladding McBean and Batchelder ceramic tiles

Additional Materials Information:

General Description:

Three polychrome tile murals depicting the rubber industry from tropical plantation to the factory.

Technical Information (Size,mfg., etc.):

"These [murals] are in the Administration Building, which was built in 1929-1930. The 

murals are surrounded by thousands and thousands of Batchelder tile. 

The murals are made in 6x6s, so you can figure out how large they are. 

They begin just above the Batchelder wainscoting, and are about two 

stories high. 

They are in near mint condition, and the present owners are very proud of 

them." (Email to Michael Padwee from Brian Kaiser, 2/19/11 1:00 AM -0800, Re: Re. Firestone Rubber Co. tile mural) 

Year Created:

c. 1929-1930

Year Installed, if different:

Does Installation Still Exist?

Yes

If Not, What Happened?

State:

California

City:

Southgate

Location of Installation:

2525 Firestone Blvd., 90280

According to Brian Kaiser, this building is now rented to the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) and is used as an Adult School. (http://southgateadultschool.com/locations/)

GPS Coordinates:

Directions to Installation:

Additional Information, Websites, Citations:

*This photo was discovered in E. Stanley Wires, "Decorative Tiles, Part IV, Their Contribution to Architecture and Ceramic Art" in New England Architect and Builder Illustrated, No. Sixteen, 1960.

Submitted by and Year:

Brian Kaiser (brian.kaiser"at"ymail.com), tile historian and preservationist, and Michael Padwee (tileback101"at"collector.org); February 2011


Color photos courtesy of Brian Kaiser







































                                                    
                   
The "large" mural